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Chess for Oldtimers --- Good Idea !


  • 3 years ago · Quote · #21

    GhostNight

    Just a point of interest, you can check my age out, but with the tools we have now to learn chess, I can easily beat me when I was at playing strength age 20 - 50!  Maybe I did not study right or life's demands were too strenuous at that point in my life. Now my biggest problem in life is how to keep my dogs occupied while I get some work done around this place!Wink

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #22

    cabadenwurt

    Thanks for the new messages. I was recently without internet services due to some type of technical problem and that was no fun at all. Things are back to normal now tho, so let the fun resume !

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #23

    AndyClifton

    Very well...but just remember, you asked for it: Smile

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #24

    cabadenwurt

    Thanks AndyClifton,  lol

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #25

    cabadenwurt

    As I look at the photo posted by AndyClifton I'm thinking the guy on our right with the glasses looks like me ( except my tummy is bigger  lol ).

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #26

    antioxidant

    as long as the eye has optimum performances, chess can still be enjoyed by elderly.i was acquainted to chess by elder people when i was young and i had good memories of them even when they are long gone. me too im getting old by turning 57 next year but sir denver high says im still spring chicken for that age when compared to him when he was about my age.teaching our brain to learn new things may prevent it from getting old,activities like chess is good to keep our mind occupied and not remain idle. relax, proper sleep and good diets and not strenous exercise may offer some good benefits to our body and mind and experiencing what we have not experiece before but not the physical ones, maybe also a be a good idea, for now i enjoy reading books when i rest.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #27

    windows96

    In distant future we will know why brain melts with age and hopefully we can enjoy our creativity for 50 + years from then

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #28

    stocke

    too long from now to think about....

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #29

    antioxidant

    paulgottlieb wrote:

    I was born 4 days after Bobby Fischer, and for some reason I was never quite able to catch up with him, chesswise. My doctor recently told me that continuing to play chess was good for staving of the onset of dementia. The bad news is that chess has encourage my paranoia and aggressiveness!


    sir may i comment on the bad news that chess has encourage your paranoia and aggresiveness, sir you must learn to be patient in chess no matter what the result it may bring, patience teaches us not to be agressive sometimes and about paranoia,it is like a dual personality,learn each other personality and adopt the good ones and not the bad ones,it is also a state of mind where there is always conflict but learn to synthesise with it and adopt the good ones and always be positive in thinking no matter what, a state of mind belief that cannot be just destabilise aim for the good.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #30

    AndyClifton

    OK Mr. Benju, you sound like my doctor he is shrink, and I am trying this.  Thank you very much!

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #31

    antioxidant

    aggressiveness is reactions of emotions,its not dictated bymind or logic. wrongdoing or blunder on life mostly derived on impulsiveness. we are no longer on this stage, we  already knowwhat is right or wrong,its logic.being a paranoid is anext stage to dementia .kahlil gibran books states;  every man has his own breaking point           and  i never opined that you have reach this stage,because chess is more a game of wits and never a game of logic,you defeat youropponent  on tactical and strategical moves and not on reasons to defeat or outclass. i play chess on my own wits,i  play on my own from experience and learning.i know playing on  on line games, winning creates more doubts especially winning against higher rated opponents. shall i say this is paranoia? or this a game of wits.....wits is essential to defeat your opponent.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #32

    AndyClifton

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #33

    AndyClifton

    Dammit ponnu, what the heck is that thing?  It isn't one of those Auditor Boxes, is it?

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #34

    goldendog

    A clear-O-meter?

    "Clear?"

    "Not yet. Please deposit $5000 and try again."

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #35

    cabadenwurt

    Wow ! Thanks Everyone for all of the recent posts on my little thread here. For anyone interested in the zany inventions of Doctor Kellogg ( such as the eek-meter  lol ) there was a funny movie made on that subject a few years back. Anthony Hopkins has a lot of fun playing the part of Doctor Kellogg in the movie: The Road To Wellville, truly one of my favourite comedies.   

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #36

    cabadenwurt

    Thanks for the update Ponnupazoozu. I've got a copy of " The Road To Wellville " on the old VHS system and I hope to get it on a dvd disc someday. One reason that I love the movie about Kellogg is that I love all manner of older mechanical devices and yes I have a thread going about restored machines  lol. 

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #37

    renumeratedfrog01

    Old people will cite Kortschnoi as an example that old people can be competitive chess-wise.... The problem is that Kortschnoi is a unique exampel.... For every Kortschnoi-like player, there are 20 teenage-chess-superstars...

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #38

    cabadenwurt

    Thanks for leaving a post Renumeratedfrog01. It is true there are only a limited number of older players who can compete at the top levels of Chess. When it comes to playing Chess for fun however one can continue to play as long as the people in the game can remember the rules  lol.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #39

    1pawndown

    I  too qualify as one, who was playing chess before Bobby Fischer won his World Title. My Father taught me at about 8 or 9 years of age. He and I played through all of the Fischer and Spasky games as they were played. We frequently found ourselves saying I wonder why he did that. We watched the games televised on PBS. We were heartbroken when Fischer declined to defend the title. I never dreamed that chess would never see that level of popularity again. We often speculated that Fischer would re-emerge to challenge again for the title, but that was never to be. Any way, I think my Father would be pleased to know that he inspired a life-long love of the game in his son. I hope I don't develop Alzheimers, because I'd like to think that I'll keep playing to the end of my days. Wouldn't it be wonderful to see another charismatic challenger arise to restore if even for a short time the popularity chess enjoyed in Fischer's hey day?

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #40

    cabadenwurt

    Thanks for the post 1Pawndown. Yes the story of Fischers life was rather sad after he won the World Championship. There were similarities with Morphy and Fischer, both great talents but yet both tragic as well. I'm sure that the USA will have another World Champ sooner or later and that will help revive Chess as well.


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