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Chess Puzzle


  • 18 months ago · Quote · #1

    65Squares

    For the following  puzzles, I have the solution but unable to understand it. Could someone explain.

    1. 

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    2. 

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #2

    65Squares

    Could you explain the solution.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #3

    MaartenSmit

    In the first one, 1. Bg5! traps the queen, she has no moves. Black tries the zwischenzug Bxf3, hoping for Qxf3 Qxg5, winning a piece. However, white can play 2. Qd2, ignoring the bishop on f3 and keeping the queen trapped. Black can only play Qxd4, otherwise the queen gets captured next move, after which white plays the discovered attack 3. Bxh7+, and next move Qxd4, winning the game.

    The second one is just a mating net. It starts with 1. Rxd5 to try to exploit the pin on the Qc7, so black can't play cxd5. 3. Nxh6+! utilizes another pin, as after gxh6 there is 4. Qg6+. I recommend you investigate all the subvariations yourself, there's a lot to learn from the second one!

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #4

    Xilmi

    The first: It's a forced queen-gain for white. I didn't really notice when trying to find the right moves for the first time. But there is no way for Black to keep his queen if white plays these moves.

    The last move was easy to find (discovered attack on the queen while checking). The first two moves I only found by trial and error. Would not have come up with those in a regular game. 8[

    I thought that taking the enemy bishop with the queen while forcing him to take with the kings pawn already was a good-enough advantage and would have settled for that. Did not see that you can force getting the queen.

    The second one is just ridiculous. "Find the mate in 10?"  I'm pretty sure that it's a forced mate and what black plays is exactly what prolongues it the most. From some point on it's easy to find the correct next moves more or less by intuition but finding that first few moves and seeing that this leads to a mate is way beyond my skill-level. :o So I can't really explain this one other than it's the result of a very long calculation. (maybe not so long if one uses an enginge)

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #5

    eddysallin

    MaartenSmit wrote:

    In the first one, 1. Bg5! traps the queen, she has no moves. Black tries the zwischenzug Bxf3, hoping for Qxf3 Qxg5, winning a piece. However, white can play 2. Qd2, ignoring the bishop on f3 and keeping the queen trapped. Black can only play Qxd4, otherwise the queen gets captured next move, after which white plays the discovered attack 3. Bxh7+, and next move Qxd4, winning the game.

    The second one is just a mating net. It starts with 1. Rxd5 to try to exploit the pin on the Qc7, so black can't play cxd5. 3. Nxh6+! utilizes another pin, as after gxh6 there is 4. Qg6+. I recommend you investigate all the subvariations yourself, there's a lot to learn from the second one!

    a trap on Q.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #6

    chessknight02

    Bg5 traps the queen!

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #7

    MaartenSmit

    eddysallin schreef:
    MaartenSmit wrote:

    In the first one, 1. Bg5! traps the queen, she has no moves. Black tries the zwischenzug Bxf3, hoping for Qxf3 Qxg5, winning a piece. However, white can play 2. Qd2, ignoring the bishop on f3 and keeping the queen trapped. Black can only play Qxd4, otherwise the queen gets captured next move, after which white plays the discovered attack 3. Bxh7+, and next move Qxd4, winning the game.

    The second one is just a mating net. It starts with 1. Rxd5 to try to exploit the pin on the Qc7, so black can't play cxd5. 3. Nxh6+! utilizes another pin, as after gxh6 there is 4. Qg6+. I recommend you investigate all the subvariations yourself, there's a lot to learn from the second one!

    a trap on Q.

    ..thanks for clearing that up.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #8

    65Squares

    Thanks Marteensmit and Xilmi. 

    Any advice on tactics book you would recommend to practise these kind of puzzles.


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