GM Andreikin vs GM Vachier-Lagrave battle in Death Match 29 LIVE on Chess.com/TV - ALL MEMBERS! Click here to watch!
Upgrade to Chess.com Premium!

Chess VS. GO


  • 3 years ago · Quote · #1

    tonymtbird

    Go currently has some advantages over chess that need to be addressed.

    1) There is never a draw in GO.

         This is a serious problem in chess in my view.  One solution would be to play a regular game and if its a draw have a "playoff" of quick games until one produces a win.

    2) GO can be played on any sized board.

         One way Chess could do this is with "mutilple level" chess like from star trek.

    3) GO professionals actually make a seady pay check from playing go!

         GO has corporations of players that are paid play go!  These professials are sometimes sent out into the local community to teach/give simuls/teaching games.  Why can we not do this in chess??  GO players also compete for titles in a way that chess does not currently enjoy.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #2

    Puchiko

    tonymtbird wrote:

    GO has corporations of players that are paid play go!  These professials are sometimes sent out into the local community to teach/give simuls/teaching games.  Why can we not do this in chess??  GO players also compete for titles in a way that chess does not currently enjoy.


    That's true for Asia, but my little sister plays Go here and a few years back, the Czech Go champion (6 dan, amateur though) was a taxi driver. He coached her, and it was very cheap-just to illustrate that the net worth of a top European player is very low.

    Chess does have people in say, the top 60, who can make a comfortable living out of tournament chess, and more lower rateds who write chess books or coach. Sure, they don't compare to footballers, but I don't think Go's pros are really that better off.

    One thing that enourmosly boosted the popularity of Go was the series Hikaru no Go, a children's anime about a boy who meets the ghost of a Go player from ancient times and with his help becomes the best player of all time. It aired on Japanese and subsequently U.S. television, and Go club attendance soared, many new clubs were created thanks to this wave of popularity. Perhaps chess could use something like this.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #3

    tonymtbird

    i was refurring to asian professionals(not ametures).  even here in america there is a go corporation that pays its professionals to spread the word of go.  i just wonder why chess can't do soemthing like this??  it just seems that it would heighten the level of competition.  chess was just a few steps away from this idea with the PCA if you remember it, but it didn't work out for several reasons that are not important here.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #4

    Tao999

    Regarding the OP:

    Go is a very different game from chess, one that is easier to learn but harder to master (computers play Go quite poorly compared to humans, quite the opposite of Chess).

    It also is more "Eastern" in design, insofar as subtle ideas of balance and influence are much more vital than issues of tactics (which dominate chess thinking).

    Go also holds a more respected place in Eastern society, being considered one of the main arts that any person must historically be proficient in to be seen as cultivated/wise in Japan I believe.

    In short, I think the games are so different that trying to make chess more Go-like is bound to fail short of massive and fundamental changes to chess, ones which most current players would probably reject based on their historical widespread rejection of almost all other chess variants.

     

    For those who want to learn about the game of Go http://playgo.to/iwtg/en/ is an excellent starting point, http://senseis.xmp.net/ is a more comprehensive site, and www.gokgs.com is a free and very popular go server with many players of a variety of strengh levels, including some basic computer programs to play against.

    Check it out, the game is not hard to learn and has hundreds of years (or more?) of people enjoying it at various levels, so there is a good chance many chess players will enjoy it as well.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #5

    oinquarki

    Puchiko wrote: Perhaps chess could use something like this.

    Reading this post was like having eighty horror movies injected directly into my brain.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #6

    ironic_begar

    You can play chess on any size board. There are 4x4, 5x5, and 6x6 variants already out there. A 7x7 variant would be easy (just take out the queen). I've also seen a 9x9 variant with an extra queen.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #7

    Puchiko

    I guess what makes this harder for chess is that people are used to their opening choice, and you can't really play QGA on a 4x4. I've played on an outdoor huge 5x5, which I found quite amusing, but it was a completely different game.

    In Go, openings (joseki) are studied sequences of moves in the corner areas of the Go board, for which the result is considered balanced for both black and white sides. Hence this knowledge can be transfered to a board of any size.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #8

    intrepidattack

    I've read that Go mimics the dynamicism of battle better than Chess does, but considering the amount of time and energy I'm putting into Chess I'm not very interested in starting over in another game.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #9

    chessmaster102

    back when I first started chess I thought about starting go  instead cause I thought to be more complex but didnt since go is mainly only a terretory concept for winning while in chess theres are many concepts you must consider for trying to win attack/defend and to me this makes chess mor ecomplex. I once heard someone say FIDE is the the 3rd largest sports orginization behind soccer and baseball I think and they are doing these things just not the countrys we live in.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #10

    intrepidattack

    chessmaster102 wrote:

    back when I first started chess I thought about starting go  instead cause I thought to be more complex but didnt since go is mainly only a terretory concept for winning while in chess theres are many concepts you must consider for trying to win attack/defend and to me this makes chess mor ecomplex. I once heard someone say FIDE is the the 3rd largest sports orginization behind soccer and baseball I think and they are doing these things just not the countrys we live in.


    You know FIDE is big when its President was the last person of stature to be quoted haven spoken to Gaddafi.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #11

    Michael_H

    I'm not really sure why Chess needs to be changed to be more similar to Go.  They're different games.  Just as we don't need to gussy up Tic Tac Toe or Checkers to make them closer to chess, I don't really see why Go and Chess can't coexist with their current parameters.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #12

    MIDYMAT

    Go is a better structured game then chess.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #13

    chessmaster102

    Michael_H wrote:

    I'm not really sure why Chess needs to be changed to be more similar to Go.  They're different games.  Just as we don't need to gussy up Tic Tac Toe or Checkers to make them closer to chess, I don't really see why Go and Chess can't coexist with their current parameters.


     +1

    MIDYMAT: your oppion I take it but can you actually say why ?

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #14

    blake78613

    It is not correct to say there could never be a draw in Go.  It is easy to imagine that there could be three ko fights each big enough to decide the game.  This would result in Go's version of perpetual check where each player rotated through the three ko fights.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #15

    chessmaster102

    blake78613 wrote:

    It is not correct to say there could never be a draw in Go.  It is easy to imagine that there could be three ko fights each big enough to decide the game.  This would result in Go's version of perpetual check where each player rotated through the three ko fights.


     actually in go if the game is drawn the win goes automatically to the black side no matter what so in that case in a official game there really is no draw which is prety stuid to me.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #16

    blake78613

    chessmaster102 wrote:
    blake78613 wrote:

    It is not correct to say there could never be a draw in Go.  It is easy to imagine that there could be three ko fights each big enough to decide the game.  This would result in Go's version of perpetual check where each player rotated through the three ko fights.


     actually in go if the game is drawn the win goes automatically to the black side no matter what so in that case in a official game there really is no draw which is prety stuid to me.


    Is there are rule that brings the game to an end in this situation?  If I were White I would keep on playing until a draw was agreed to.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #17

    GlennBk

    I play go occasionally on a 13x13 board it is a very difficult game to get to grips with and the visualisation is totally different from chess. It is also true to say that the wins are graded because you win by so many stones. Odds games are frequently played and make much more sense than chess odds games.

    However there is room in the world for many different games to occupy us between the cradle and the grave.

    Perhaps life itself is a large game played on the expansive canvas of time.

    Tis all a chequer board of nights and days

    Where destiny with men for pieces plays

    Hither and thither, moves, mates and slays

    And one by one back in the closet lays.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #18

    tonymtbird

    just one hilarious go vairient (anti-go, or stop if you like).  if you encaputure any territory or an opponents stone you lose, some people also add an "extra" rule of not being able to make a connection to the ememy stones.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #19

    k67

    Chess, needs more imagination than go, cause go, can be played quickly with the same end than fast.. imaginations needs time. Go computer vs Chess computer.. was hard to make a computer win to a grandmaster of chess, and chess have 64 places... go have 361... and a computer is almost the best on go, will not take to much time to a computer win to a human. computers are like calculaters, you cant beat them on equasions, but you can kill the machine..

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #20

    ChessisGood

    What is the problem with draws in chess? It is part of the game, and it seems fewer and fewer people understand that these days.


Back to Top

Post your reply: