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coaching low rated english teachers in exchange for tutoring ?


  • 10 months ago · Quote · #21

    goldendog

    SupremeOverlord wrote:

    ima grait @ inglish i takit

    not him me i teech you gud boy.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #22

    chessmaster102

    ok thanks bandii, Auntie_Miam, and dashkee94 ill message you guys about it. It's 10:30pm here so im going to do some homework and go to bed for now. Tommorrow I have english class at 4:30pm but I always leave at 2:30pm (buses here never arrive on time and its the best way I get to class on time.) So anytime before like 1pm tommorrow im free and ill begin the coaching for those who asked this weekend. Send me the times you guys are usually on time so I can get to making a schedule right away Thanks again guys I really appericiate it you dont even know. Smile

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #23

    goldendog

    dis is rig.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #24

    Auntie_Maim

    Oh, hey, Jaylen, you're a homeboy!  I'm from the Detroit area myself.  I have things I have to do on Mondays and Wednesdays, but I am available any other day during the week.  Any time is fine.  Let me know when you have a couple of hours strung together.

    Do message me when you can.  I'd love to know where you're studying :)

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #25

    Ziryab

    Auntie_Maim wrote:
    Ziryab wrote:
    Auntie_Maim wrote:

    That's right, she didn't.  She preferred MLA. 

    That's a bad choice for history papers. Fortunately, your paper fails to conform to some of the inappropriate aspects of MLA.

    Full justification and two spaces after a period are not MLA either.

     

    Back in the day (when we had pyramids to build), we were taught that full justification with two spaces after a period was actually the preferred model for academic writing.  

    You do know that you're younger than me and than all but one of my siblings. I, too, was taught all sorts of contradictory things by H.S. and even college teachers. Had I not picked up on the methodology before then, graduate school would have taught me to go to the source, i.e., read the Chicago Manual, the MLA Stylebook, and the Uniform System of Citation manual for myself. For several years, Chicago sat on the shelf next to my desk with book listing the DOS commands that I needed to operate my word processor.

    One of my professors said it well. Although at the time he said it, we all thought of him as arrogant. A few years of college teaching revised my views of lots of things he said.

    "It helps when your personal preference gravitates towards what is right." He might have been explaining the reason he, as an English professor and academic journal editor, preferred Chicago to MLA, or he might have been talking about some point more mundane. That, I cannot recall (when you're over 50, you'll understand). 

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #26

    Auntie_Maim

    Sadly, I'm not that far behind you.  I understand a lot more than you may think.

    Unfortunately, these days most professors are far more concerned with larger issues at the college level than whether or not one places two spaces after a period.  They're glad if you can spell.  If your writing looks as if you're not going to be arrested anytime soon for apostrophe abuse, they're over the moon.  Sad, but true.  I've had to tutor college seniors who don't know how to properly use a comma, let alone a semicolon, and I don't even want to get started on spelling.  I really don't.  This is material that should have been covered by sixth grade, and yet we have basic issues -- like spelling and punctuation -- that still have not been addressed by the time most students hit their undergraduate studies.

    This is not to say it's all the kids' fault, either.  Most of the professors I've had over the years cannot write themselves -- and one cannot give away what one does not have. 

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #27

    Ziryab

    My classes always have had a mix of students. Many lack rudimentary skills, but not all. Most have errors to unlearn that were taught be ill-informed teachers. The best students must be offered standards to reach towards.

    I've come to the conclusion that ability to spell is genetic. It cannot be taught. In the present instance (your pupil), the inability may stem from laziness.

    When I was younger, I had the view that avid readers were good spellers. Experience has challenged that notion. 

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #28

    Auntie_Maim

    One word: phonics.  "See and say" has never worked effectively.

    If my prospective pupil has had to study in the Detroit public school system, I can tell you from experience that laziness on his part may not be the issue.  Faculty in the metro system has been dismal for years -- all of my life, certainly, and long before.  It's part of the reason my mother went to teach in an ivy-league prep school instead of continuing to bang her head against the wall with the public system.

    What we're seeing now is the end result of a culture of low to no expectations, and complete abdication of responsibility by those who ought to know better.  I have absolutely no sympathy for those who continue to simply throw money at the problem; Detroit's -- and California's -- school systems prove the point.  Professional and personal responsibility is the true issue.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #29

    Ziryab

    Fonics wont teech spelleng.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #30

    AlCzervik

    Ziryab wrote:
    Auntie_Maim wrote:

    .........And I'll be more than happy to trade you some english tutoring for chess coaching.....absolutely!  I have excellent English skills, and specialize in grammar and spelling help.  My chess, on the other hand, sucks big wind.  If you want to barter one for the other, contact me!

    Do you know correct use for ellipses? He might need that if he writes any research papers.

    Is he researching geometry?

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #31

    TetsuoShima

    thats a good idea, hopefully one day im good enough in chess to teach it.

    hopefully after learning proper english someone also can teach me math.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #32

    AlCzervik

    It all starts with the circle.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #33

    Ziryab

    AlCzervik wrote:
    Ziryab wrote:
    Auntie_Maim wrote:

    .........And I'll be more than happy to trade you some english tutoring for chess coaching.....absolutely!  I have excellent English skills, and specialize in grammar and spelling help.  My chess, on the other hand, sucks big wind.  If you want to barter one for the other, contact me!

    Do you know correct use for ellipses? He might need that if he writes any research papers.

    Is he researching geometry?

     

    He's young enough that he shall. Nonetheless, it may be worth noting that ellipsis marks or ellipses are sprinkled in much writing, often wrongly. Three dots are an ellipsis, usually marking an omission from a quotation. Ellipses is the plural.

    More than three dots is simple failure (sorta like caps lock).

    MLA has the odd practice, defensible in this case, of putting brackets around an ellipsis marking an omission from a quotation, but without brackets when the ellipsis was in the quotation. Presumably, this rule could apply to strings of dots that are something other than ellipsis.

    Hence, Auntie_Maim wrote, "I'll be more than happy to trade you some english tutoring for chess coaching.....absolutely!  I have excellent English skills, [...]  My chess, on the other hand, sucks big wind."

    It's rare that this particular nuance is helpful, but I seem to recall there was one passage in my dissertation where the bracketing would have helped at the cost of hundreds of extra brackets on the other 299 pages. Thankfully, I used Chicago.

    http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/ellipses?page=all 


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