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Covert chess


  • 7 months ago · Quote · #1

    robbie_1969

    Robert J Fischer (peace be upon him) chastised Karpov and Kasparov and claimed that he himself played 'honest' chess.  Now one can argue over the validity of Fischers statement but the idea struck me and I was wondering how important it is to refrain from giving ones opponent as little information as possible by playing the least commital moves as possible.

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #2

    herbie53

    Boring chess, but that is how I 'Try' to play. Fischer is/was crazy and his claims on Karpov and Kasparov was just as silly. He would have beaten Karpov 1975, but if you don't play we will 'REALLY' never know. Play your style, whatever that is, and try to get your opponent to play 'your' game.

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #3

    robbie_1969

    How important Herbie do you think it is to conceal your intent? Would you for example play 1.d4 and then 2.Nf3 instead of 2.c4 to conceal what you will do with the c pawn?

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #4

    Gringo012345

    I would think the greater the uncertainty, the greater the confusion for the opponent. Captain Liddell Hart, in his great book Strategy mentions a great many generals of the past who won because they never went for the war of attrition. These greats confused the psychological balance of the opposing generals buy having more than one targets. This would force the defender to make decisions whether to distribute their forces or leave one side a bit weaker. It also ties the opponent into calculating more than would have been required in the case of outright committal. Gringo

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #5

    Ron-Weasley

    robbie_1969 wrote:

    Robert J Fischer (peace be upon him) chastised Karpov and Kasparov and claimed that he himself played 'honest' chess.  Now one can argue over the validity of Fischers statement but the idea struck me and I was wondering how important it is to refrain from giving ones opponent as little information as possible by playing the least commital moves as possible.

    The Soviets were notorious cheats. They rigged games to try to force Fischer to play tougher opponents in candidates tournament just so an American couldn't get a shot, unfair arbiters bribed by the Soviets and such dirty tricks, but he won anyway. That might be what he meant.

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #6

    robbie_1969

    yeah very interesting Gringo, thanks for the idea.

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #7

    herbie53

    robbie_1969 wrote:

    How important Herbie do you think it is to conceal your intent? Would you for example play 1.d4 and then 2.Nf3 instead of 2.c4 to conceal what you will do with the c pawn?

    No. I would not conceal much in the opening, but in the middle game it maybe a little different. Besides, I have no idea on how to conceal moves.

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #8

    robbie_1969




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