Upgrade to Chess.com Premium!

Dear staff - regarding rules of castling


  • 4 years ago · Quote · #1

    Vulpesvictor

    Just thought I'd pop in to suggest a minor enhancement on the chessopedia article regarding castling: http://www.chess.com/chessopedia/view/castling

    It - like many other articles on the subject found on the internet - doesn't say anything about the disposition of the rook during the procedure.
    'Couple of days ago worthy opponent became quite upset midgame, when I castled queenside. Surely the rook WAS threatened on its way through the procedure, but I had no luck convincing him that it was perfectly all right for said piece to be theatened during castling.

    Just a thought, but maybe you guys could excell where others have failed when it comes to ellaborating the precise rules of castling. It'd be nice to have a direct reference to this specific aspect of the rules.

    Best regards, have a nice day,

    vulpes

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #2

    philidor_position

    From the link you've given:

    Castling can only occur if there are no pieces standing between the king and the rook.  Neither king nor rook may have moved from its original position.  There can be no opposing piece that could possible capture the king in his original square (you cannot castle while you are in check), the square he moves through, or the square that he ends the turn (you cannot castle into check).

    Looks clear enough to me. All limitations are listed, listing all non-limitations is not required.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #3

    Vulpesvictor

    philidor_position wrote:

    From the link you've given:

    Castling can only occur if there are no pieces standing between the king and the rook.  Neither king nor rook may have moved from its original position.  There can be no opposing piece that could possible capture the king in his original square (you cannot castle while you are in check), the square he moves through, or the square that he ends the turn (you cannot castle into check).

    Looks clear enough to me. All limitations are listed, listing all non-limitations is not required.


    You DO have a point (you'd have to have specific rules on pieces jumping of the board, joining a space armada mid game, why you shouldn't microwave pieces during castling etc.)!

    Still, I think this is a general misconception (I've met it before) just like people becoming upset over en passant and whatnot. Thus it could be clarified with some benefit, I think.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #4

    Timotheous

    "Castling is the only time in the game when more than one piece may be moved during a turn. "

    And I would possibly disagree with the way this is worded. 

    At pawn promotion, a pawn is moved and upon promotion is moved off of the board, and another piece is moved in it's place. I guess by move, it is not meaning that you physically only move one piece, but that you treat the pawn promotion as if it really became the other piece. This is true when playing electronically, but when playing with wooden pieces you do technically move two pieces during the pawn promotion.

    ok ok... before I get chewed out too bad.... I am really just joking.

    Wink

    maybe change to.... 

    "Castling is the only time in the game when more than one piece currently already on the board may be moved during the turn."

    But really.... most of these kinds of issues are resolved if you play better opponents. I wouldn't want the rules of chess to have to be expanded into a set of books the size of the Regulations of the U.S. Internal Revenue Service in order to account for all possible misunderstandings. 

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #5

    Vulpesvictor

    Timotheous wrote:

    "Castling is the only time in the game when more than one piece may be moved during a turn. "

    And I would possibly disagree with the way this is worded. 

    At pawn promotion, a pawn is moved and upon promotion is moved off of the board, and another piece is moved in it's place. I guess by move, it is not meaning that you physically only move one piece, but that you treat the pawn promotion as if it really became the other piece. This is true when playing electronically, but when playing with wooden pieces you do technically move two pieces during the pawn promotion.

    ok ok... before I get chewed out too bad.... I am really just joking.

     

    maybe change to.... 

    "Castling is the only time in the game when more than one piece currently already on the board may be moved during the turn."

    But really.... most of these kinds of issues are resolved if you play better opponents. I wouldn't want the rules of chess to have to be expanded into a set of books the size of the Regulations of the U.S. Internal Revenue Service in order to account for all possible misunderstandings. 


    Does the pawn actually transform? This is gonna be a bit expensive in ones chess set budget and what to do with all those queens? Firewood?

    I'm not all that good, myself. I usually filter for 1100 through 1600 in live games, so I can learn and win on a fairly dynamic basis. Above 2000 is just murder, really, and I usually don't know what hit me and have to come here, crying about it. Sigh.

    Oh well, my suggestion is out there, time for some games ;)


Back to Top

Post your reply: