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Do you think chess and mathematics are related?


  • 6 days ago · Quote · #381

    petrosianpupil

    Have to agree dr spud

  • 6 days ago · Quote · #382

    Stephen86Reed

    chess also have a lot to do with deception, foresight and awareness without those you could be good at math all you want and get you king cornered.

  • 6 days ago · Quote · #383

    JoyofSatan_dot_org

    If a1 = 11 and h8 = 88, and if g2 = 72 and g7 = 77, you would add 1 to 72 to make 73 for an opening pawn move. Or 52+2=54 for e4. Your opponent would subtract 2 from 57 to get 55 for e5. You can plot it out on a graph. You can also do the moves for rooks and knights and bishop and queens. Pawn capture, en passent. I have not gone too far into it. I don't see much purpose for it except maybe for a chess program. I really just wanted to say chess is math when I was taking a math course at college. Let me know what you guys think.

  • 6 days ago · Quote · #384

    DrSpudnik

    Not everything with numbers is math.

  • 6 days ago · Quote · #385

    chatur64

    A knight looks like the number 68, a king looks like the number 69, a queen looks like the number 70, a pawn looks like a tomato, a bishop looks like the number 43774934883, and a rook looks like the number -1. This is how math is related to chess.

  • 6 days ago · Quote · #386

    petrosianpupil

    Very common mistake though. When I went to do my mathematics degree it was in an age where calculators were rare and expensive things. I contacted the university to ask what calculator they used for the course. They replied it was a mathematics degree so why would you need a calculator. More about ideas than numbers. To wind me up, my old teacher bubbly would say here comes the head of sums.

  • 6 days ago · Quote · #387

    suhas_parmar

    how are those 2 are related 

  • 5 days ago · Quote · #388

    DrSpudnik

    I believe we established above that they are second cousins on their mother's side.

  • 5 days ago · Quote · #389

    petrosianpupil

    I don't know how many maths lectures or chess Congress's you have been to lately but I think it's the fathers side

  • 3 days ago · Quote · #390

    ClavierCavalier

    JoyofSatan_dot_org wrote:

    If a1 = 11 and h8 = 88, and if g2 = 72 and g7 = 77, you would add 1 to 72 to make 73 for an opening pawn move. Or 52+2=54 for e4. Your opponent would subtract 2 from 57 to get 55 for e5. You can plot it out on a graph. You can also do the moves for rooks and knights and bishop and queens. Pawn capture, en passent. I have not gone too far into it. I don't see much purpose for it except maybe for a chess program. I really just wanted to say chess is math when I was taking a math course at college. Let me know what you guys think.

    This seems to make no sense.  1. e4 = 54 = 52+2, right?  In that case, black playing e4 at some point is also 54 because 55-1=54.  What if tyhe queen moves to e4?  Is this still 54?  If one were to add the piece value to the equation, such as giving a knight +3, then Ne1 = 54.  Therefore there is no way to show what moves where, meaning your current system denotes nothing.  There are other problems.  How about 37... Nfd5?  How about Qa1 - Qh8?  Your system has nothing to include moving across files, designating pieces, captures, and special descriptors such as check.

    The idea of a graph illustrates nothing.  Graphs are a visual representation of data.  Your system will require two graphs since black also moves.  Therefore, soon as black plays 1... e5, they are shown as having a higher number on the graph than white, giving us an asymmetrical graph to represent a symmetrical chessboard.  Another option would to have a negative graph for black, but now we're back to descriptive notation.  The more important flaw in the graph is that is represents nothing on the chessboard.  It does nothing to show the strength of the position, or event he position itself.

  • 3 days ago · Quote · #391

    SmyslovFan

    What JoyofSatan neglected to mention is that he's using international correspondence chess code. 

    The way to read it is instead of letters for the files, they receive numbers. And the ranks also have number. Files appear first, so e2 is represented by 52. e4 is represented by 54. 53 would be e3. The normal way to write 1.e4 in such a system is 5254. The advantage of this system is that it does not depend on any letters. Rf1 means Rook to f1 in English, but K to f1 in French.

    1.Nf3 would appear as 7163 (g1-f3).


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