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Draw Offers In Hopelessly Lost Positions..


  • 14 months ago · Quote · #21

    RoyCroft

    People who do this repetitvely have no chess etiquette.  They should be banned from the site.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #22

    blowerd

    B-Lamberth wrote:

    It is part of the game that you can offer draw after each move just like in OTB chess. Nothing weird in that. Just ignore it and focus on destroying your opponent.  

    Of course it is actually against the laws of chess. 

     

    12.6

    It is forbidden to distract or annoy the opponent in any manner whatsoever. This includes unreasonable claims, unreasonable offers of a draw or the introduction of a source of noise into the playing area.

    12.7

    Infraction of any part of Articles 12.1 to 12.6 shall lead to penalties in accordance with Article 13.4.

    12.8  Persistent refusal by a player to comply with the Laws of Chess shall be penalised by loss of the game. The arbiter shall decide the score of the opponent.

    13.4  The arbiter can apply one or more of the following penalties:

    1. warning
    2. increasing the remaining time of the opponent
    3. reducing the remaining time of the offending player
    4. declaring the game to be lost
    5. reducing the points scored in the game by the offending party
    6. increasing the points scored in the game by the opponent to the maximum available for that game
    7. expulsion from the event.

     

    So nope it is not part of the game, and nor is it part of OTB chess. 

     

    I suppose one thing you can say (not specifically related to this website) is that it is part of human behaviour, and difficult to enforce these specific laws of chess on the internet. 

     

    You certianly can't make a draw offer after every move, especially if you are losing heavily in material though! 

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #23

    Jimmykay

    i once thought as you, and took such offers as offense, until 3 hours ago.

    I was playing a bullet game, up 7 queens, an well ahead on time. The draw offer came. At first, I wanted to dismiss it. But then I asked...why? As is turned out, me opponent had a bet with his wife. She had said that he must quit chess forever. He said, :"But one more game." and a wager they made!

    If he did not lose, he could play chess to his heart us content, until the day he dies.

    But if he were to lose, he must not only quit chess forever, but also allow her to have relations with whatever man she chooses, whenever she chooses!

    My quandry was multiplied by the fact that she had approached me for love just the day before! How could I be objective? What a quandry!

    So the game was played. I ended up 24 queens ahead with a clear mate in 185 moves when he made his draw offer.

    By accepting his draw offer, I would gain his friendship for life. But by beating him, I would be able to have relations with his wife until I die!

    What to do I wondered! Oh what a problem~I have 90 minutes to make my choice. HELP NOW!!!!

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #24

    macer75

    Jimmykay wrote:

    By accepting his draw offer, I would gain his friendship for life. But by beating him, I would be able to have relations with his wife until I die!

    And you're actually thinking about what to do? Come on - it's a no brainer!

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #25

    General-Mayhem

    Just play your move and ignore it, tbh i can think of a million things more distracting then a draw offer message appearing in chat

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #26

    YeOldeWildman

    It's just a question of chess etiquette: practically speaking, you get one draw offer per game, unless your opponent subsequently offers you a draw and you decline and continue play (and how often does that happen...?). Anything more is rude at best and harassment at worst.

    Since this is the internet, rude behavior is, alas, to be expected frequently. So when it happens, just decline obnoxious draw offers and make sure you try extra hard to nail them.

    One thing that might solve the problem (assuming it really is a problem...) would be to borrow an aspect of the doubling cube from backgammon. In backgammon once you double, your opponent gets control of the cube if he accepts the double and you can't double again.

    The chess variant would work similarly to normal chess etiquette: either player can make the first draw offer, but if your opponent offers a draw and you decline, you get control of the "draw cube" (or token or whatever...) and now only you can offer a draw (or vice versa). Of course, there are enough things that need doing/fixing around here, I wouldn't even bother asking for it as a new feature.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #27

    RG1951

            The idea is worth considering.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #28

    aman_makhija

    Ignore it. If you make a move the draw will automatically be declined.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #29

    macer75

    aman_makhija wrote:

    Ignore it. If you make a move the draw will automatically be declined.

    Yup, that's what I always do.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #30

    RG1951

    owltuna wrote:

    Make it like the doubling cube. At the beginning of the game, either player may offer a draw. Once an offer is made and declined, only the opponent may now make the offer. USW. Easy to implement on a chess site.

            That's what is suggested above.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #31

    Scottrf

    But I like spamming draw offers when my opponent is playing on dead drawn positions.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #32

    jivvi

    I once had an opponent offer me a draw in this position:

    Obviously he was offering facetiously, I declined and queened my pawn, he said "Good luck catching me," and I did.

    A few games later, I returned the favour by offering him a draw in this position:

    Obviously he declined, promoted his pawn, and then went on to give me the draw anyway.

    Neither of us offered the draw more than once, and in both cases it was not so much annoying as it was humorous.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #33

    johnyoudell

    I like owltuna's idea. It accords with chess etiquette as I was taught it.

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #34

    Jed_Leland

    RG1951 wrote:

            One presumes that when an opponent, who is almost certainly lost, offers a draw, he doesn't actually expect it to be agreed. To think otherwise would be extraordinarily naive. Does he then do it in an effort to distract the overwhelmingly likely winner? Does he imagine an outpouring of sympathy for his predicament will result? 

            I find it irritating when I have newly promoted Queen and rook against King and I am offered a draw twice. Would drawing this to the attention of the website managers result in anything? I know others have complained about the same thing - in some cases where multiple draw offers have been rapidly fired off and declined.

    I've seen that happen many times. I've been offered a draw when I was ahead by a pawn, a piece, a rook -- even a queen! It's cheesy at best, unsportsmanlike at worst. The best thing to do is ignore it. A legitimate draw offer deserves the courtesy of a reply, but the type of offer we're talking about here does not.

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #35

    chessmicky

    Repeatedly asking for a draw is a form of harassment that is strictly against the rules. But a one-time draw offer from someone who is clearly lost can just be met with a simple "no thanks" If you allow yourself to be distracted, annoyed or insulted, you're just hurting yourself. Focus!

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #36

    repac3161

    There is also the possibility that you could press the accept button by mistake, especially when pressured for time.

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #37

    jivvi

    repac3161 wrote:

    There is also the possibility that you could press the accept button by mistake, especially when pressured for time.

    That's probably what people are hoping for when they offer it multiple times, rather than just once because it's funny. I heard of a game OTB where someone who had three queens against a knight (or some similarly crushing advantage) just looked up and said "Draw?" with a smirk on his face, because of how funny it was to think the position wasn't totally won. His opponent simply said "Yes," and once the offer was accepted it couldn't be retracted, so the game was drawn. Serves him right I reckon.

    There is also something to be said for making a draw offer pause the opponents clock while they are deciding whether to accept it, to remove the possibility for people to use it as an unfair advantage when they are losing on the board and winning on time.

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #38

    solskytz

    Or at least to give a five or ten second time delay after making the draw offer and before the opponent's clock starts ticking. 

    In official competitions now, OTB, from 1/7/2014 a player will have to offer a draw on his own time, after making his move and before hitting the clock. 

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #39

    blowerd

    solskytz wrote:

    Or at least to give a five or ten second time delay after making the draw offer and before the opponent's clock starts ticking. 

    In official competitions now, OTB, from 1/7/2014 a player will have to offer a draw on his own time, after making his move and before hitting the clock. 

    Of course that is impossible to enforce on chess.com as soon as the move is made it then goes to your opponents time.  I usually make my move then ask for a draw whilst my finger is on the clock, before pressing the clock, so the opponent has to think about the draw offer on their own time. 


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