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Drawing Combinations (Lesson 1 free coaching)


  • 20 months ago · Quote · #1

    Bojkovoik

    Tactics play a major role in defence. You should not only spot your opponents threats and react to them, but you should also exploit all your own tactical resources, Such a kind of resource include "Drawing Combinations"

    Here is a game played between top level players "Feling versus Rutschi" this game was played in the year 1985 in Switzerland.


    Stalemate

     

    The above game shows the true value of thought process before playing each move on the board as once played can never be taken back and the results could be decisive for just one single inaccurate move.



  • 20 months ago · Quote · #2

    ElKitch

    Nice example, but what I really need to learn is the proces towards it. When should I look for this? When all my pieces are stuck (in this example, pawn, pawn and king are stuck). So if you then can sacrifice all your pieces in a forcing way then its a forced draw. Correct?

    That happening is so extremely rare though..

    And in what other cases can you force a draw? Usually a Queen pushing the King around to the same spot. What kind of positions allow such a draw? A cornered king behind a pawn? ehrr

    Well.. my point is: often people teach by showing a game. But I need a description of the 'characteristics of the position' so I can look for that in a game and apply it.

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #3

    Bojkovoik

    ElKitch wrote:

    Nice example, but what I really need to learn is the proces towards it. When should I look for this? When all my pieces are stuck (in this example, pawn, pawn and king are stuck). So if you then can sacrifice all your pieces in a forcing way then its a forced draw. Correct?

    That happening is so extremely rare though..

    And in what other cases can you force a draw? Usually a Queen pushing the King around to the same spot. What kind of positions allow such a draw? A cornered king behind a pawn? ehrr

    Well.. my point is: often people teach by showing a game. But I need a description of the 'characteristics of the position' so I can look for that in a game and apply it.

    Sure, if you would like a full explination I'll do that from my next free lesson :) I'm sure it will help 


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