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Language vs Slang


  • 4 years ago · Quote · #1

    antiprot

    I was just thinking how funny is serbian chess language (or slang maybe) so I'll do the translation.

    KING = KING - I guess we couldn't invent better word Tongue out

    QUEEN = LADY - we use word queen but in chess books can appear big problem because the word 'queen' starts with the same letter as the word 'king' so the annotation would be weard

     king (english) = Kralj (serbian)  queen (english) = Kraljica (serbian)

    same first letter... Lady sounds sweet... and dangerous...

    (lady (english) = dama (serbian))

    BISHOP = HUNTER - I like to think that bishop uses bow and arrow cause he can reach distant parts of board... and it sounds more aggresive to me than 'bishop'...

    KNIGHT = HORSE or JUMPER - I guess this isn't the case only in serbian language. When I say 'knight' on serbian I picture a warrior but I dont see him on the board so we use (in chess books) the word 'jumper' because of its characteristic. The word 'horse' is used very often.

    ROOK = CANNON - heavy artillery. The word 'rook' sounds static to me but when I say 'cannon a8' sounds like trouble is coming...

    PAWN = WALKER - I think it is derived from PEON (pawn) - a soldier that walks, (pawns = infantry)

    In serbian chess books its normal to read things like:

    english 'Knight takes Queen' = serbian 'Jumper takes Lady'

    but in common reallife situations we use the word 'eats' instead of 'takes' so it sounds funny when u say

    EAT THE HORSE MAN!!! AND MATE IN 3!!!

    EAT THE CANNON!!!

    etc.

    'u can eat his horse but he can't eat yours because loses a lady'

    so that was it. serbian chess language is a true danger :)

    GREETINGS FROM SERBIA

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #2

    antiprot

    HORSE EATS THE QUEEN!!!

    Yell

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #3

    kohai

    Interesting to see how chess piece names are interpreted in other languages

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #4

    Wouter_Remmerswaal

    antiprot wrote:

    PAWN = WALKER - I think it is derived from PEON (pawn) - a soldier that walks, (pawns = infantry)


    Interesting, in Dutch the bishop is called a walker (Loper) and a pawn is called a pion (pawn).

    Also we seem to be the only country that doesn't eat the pieces but hit them!

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #5

    antiprot

    Wouter_Remmerswaal wrote:
    antiprot wrote:

    PAWN = WALKER - I think it is derived from PEON (pawn) - a soldier that walks, (pawns = infantry)


    Interesting, in Dutch the bishop is called a walker (Loper) and a pawn is called a pion (pawn).

    Also we seem to be the only country that doesn't eat the pieces but hit them!


    Hey listen! We call bishop LAUFER similar to LOPER so thanks for reminding me! It's rare but old guys born in 1950s or even older still use it!


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