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female grandmasters


  • 5 years ago · Quote · #1

    SchuBomb

    I just wanted to discuss the fate of the first two female grandmasters, Nona Gaprindashivili and Maia Chiburdanidze.

    First of all, for Nona. I understand that FIDE awarded her the title after only one Grandmaster norm, for some kind of special reason. My question is: did she ever eventually achieve more grandmaster norms such that she would have earned the grandmaster title without FIDE intervention?

    My question about Maia is, since Susan Polgar is talked about as the first woman to gain the grandmaster title the proper way, how did she get her title? Did she get some similar FIDE intervention? Would she have gained the title without the intervention?

    Not much information seems to exist on the internet about this subject.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #2

    odessian

    Nona was the 6th women world champion. I think this title deserved the WGM title.

    In 1978 Gaprindashvili became the first woman to be awarded the Grandmaster title. She was awarded the title as a result of winning Lone Pine 1977 against a field of 45 players, mostly grandmasters. Although she did not meet the technical requirements for the GM Title, this result was so spectacular that FIDE found it sufficient. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nona_Gaprindashvili

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #3

    SchuBomb

    First of all, I'm not talking about the WGM title, I'm talking about the open GM title, obviously. And also, that doesn't answer any of my questions, and I'm perfectly capable of looking up wikipedia on my own (and wikipedia also does not answer my questions, otherwise I'm sure I wouldn't be asking at all, since that was the first place I looked for information).

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #4

    Zerrogi

    SchuBomb wrote:

    First of all, I'm not talking about the WGM title, I'm talking about the open GM title, obviously. And also, that doesn't answer any of my questions, and I'm perfectly capable of looking up wikipedia on my own (and wikipedia also does not answer my questions, otherwise I'm sure I wouldn't be asking at all, since that was the first place I looked for information).


    Actually, I'd say he pretty thoroughly answered the question about Nona.  He even provided a link to a very informative wikipedia article.  By the way, WGM is the official title for female grandmasters.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #6

    orangehonda

    Zerrogi wrote:
    SchuBomb wrote:

    First of all, I'm not talking about the WGM title, I'm talking about the open GM title, obviously. And also, that doesn't answer any of my questions, and I'm perfectly capable of looking up wikipedia on my own (and wikipedia also does not answer my questions, otherwise I'm sure I wouldn't be asking at all, since that was the first place I looked for information).


    Actually, I'd say he pretty thoroughly answered the question about Nona.  He even provided a link to a very informative wikipedia article.  By the way, WGM is the official title for female grandmasters.


    Well, at least you got 1 out of 3 right... he did provide a wiki article.  The other stuff you said... no Tongue out

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #7

    SchuBomb

    Zerrogi wrote:
    SchuBomb wrote:

    First of all, I'm not talking about the WGM title, I'm talking about the open GM title, obviously. And also, that doesn't answer any of my questions, and I'm perfectly capable of looking up wikipedia on my own (and wikipedia also does not answer my questions, otherwise I'm sure I wouldn't be asking at all, since that was the first place I looked for information).


    Actually, I'd say he pretty thoroughly answered the question about Nona.  He even provided a link to a very informative wikipedia article.  By the way, WGM is the official title for female grandmasters.


    Uh, no he didn't. First of all, I am talking about women who are grandmasters. WGM is easier to get than GM: the only thing that is harder about getting a WGM title is that you can't be male. WGM is generally easier to get than IM.

    Second of all, no, that article only says what I already said in my original post: Nona got one GM norm, and FIDE awarded her the title especially, aside from their regulations.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #8

    SchuBomb

    Natalia_Pogonina wrote:

    Nona has been awarded this title (never had enough norms or rating), while Maia was the first woman to qualify for it the standard way. She actually won a few strong male events.

     


    THANK YOU Natalia :) I had heard that Susan Polgar was the first to qualify the standard way, but I guess that was incorrect.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #9

    odessian

    Maia was GM and WGM. FIDE made an exception for Nona, what is not clear?

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #10

    Atos

    Maya had a rating well above 2500, and before the ratings inflation. Why it is claimed that Polgar was the first one to qualify, I am not sure.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #11

    Quasimorphy

    Had Chiburdanidze already been awarded the GM title before she made the norms?  That might be the basis for the claim that Polgar was the first to get the GM title through qualifying for it.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #12

    dannyhume

    This is from Wikipedia's entry on Susan Polgar...

    In January 1991, Polgar became the first woman to earn the Grandmaster title in the conventional way – that is, by achieving three GM norms and a rating over 2500. (Nona Gaprindashvili was awarded the Grandmaster title in 1978 as a result of winning Lone Pine International 1977, but she did not make the normally required three GM norms. Maia Chiburdanidze was awarded the GM title in 1984 for beating Nona Gaprindashvili and two others in matches for the Women's World Chess Championship).

    This is from Susan Polgar's site...

    In January 1991, Polgar broke the gender barrier again by becoming the first woman to earn the men's Grandmaster title by achieving three GM norms and rating over 2500. (Nona Gaprindashvili and Maia Chiburdanidze had earlier been awarded the title by virtue of being Women's World Champions). Susan's younger sister Judit earned the title of Grandmaster later in December 1991.

     

    FIRST WOMAN EVER IN HISTORY TO


     Break the gender barrier to qualify for the Men’s World Championship Cycle (1986)
    Earn the Men’s Grandmaster title (1991)
     Win the U.S. Open Blitz Championship (2003)
    Receive the Grandmaster of the Year Award (2003)
  • 5 years ago · Quote · #13

    proKnight98

    I know an 8 year old who represented USA for the norm in Argentina, he has been crowned the youngest FIDE master in the world. He has only been in one norm. My chess coach teaches him. I know his name starts with a "D".

    Maybe titles are awarded depending on age, or maybe skill. I know some really high rated players on chess.com that can beat GM's and they can become a GM is they earn it.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #14

    Atos

    Quasimorphy wrote:

    Had Chiburdanidze already been awarded the GM title before she made the norms?  That might be the basis for the claim that Polgar was the first to get the GM title through qualifying for it.


     I think so.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #15

    Atos

    notlesu wrote:

    Didnt Maia's mother travel everywhere with her. Maia was like a female Kamsky. Gata's dad always traveled with him because he thought chess promoters and other players would take advantage of his son. Maia's mother had similar feelings---if you get my drift!!

    Bobby said he could spot Nona a Knight---and I dont recall her challenging Fischer!!!!!


     I guess Bobby was Bobby, but a horse is a horse.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #16

    dannyhume

    I think the Russians had faith in a crappy GM known as "Karpov", maybe you have heard of him.  

    It is funny to hear the bold challenges of a super-GM to weaker GM's, yet is nowhere to be found when someone "his size" comes along.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #17

    SchuBomb

    I have done a little extra research, and the womens world champion gets an automatic GM title for the championship, so maybe that rule came into effect sometime between when Nona got the GM title through FIDE special intervention and when Maya got the title. So that would be how Maya got it originally, but I wouldn't be surprised if, like Natalia said, she would have earned it otherwise in the end.

    That would substantiate the claim that Susan was the first woman to earn it in normal tournament play.

    Nona: special FIDE intervention (rule that women's world champion would get the title wasn't in effect yet)

    Maia: Women's world champion (but later, probably would have earned the title in normal tournament play anyway)

    Susan: Tournament play (and was later women's world champion anyway)

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #18

    SchuBomb

    odessian wrote:

    Maia was GM and WGM. FIDE made an exception for Nona, what is not clear?


    Well, you seemed to be confused as to whether I meant a GM or a WGM before, so maybe you should tell me what is not clear ;)

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #19

    Atos

    notlesu wrote:

    If it was a talking horse it would say---"But a win is a win."

    Morphy gave knight odds to strong chess playing males---and won!!!

    The Russians were always so eager to take Fischer down, why didnt they jump on this opportunity to challenge him to a match with Nona. It would have been a blockbuster! Could it be they didnt have that much faith in Nona??? 


     I 'll give you Knight odds any time. The game will be broadcasted on chess.com TV.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #20

    Chesspro76

    There shouldnt be anything seperate in mens/womens chess besides which restrooms they use between matches. There is no physical advantage to be had in chess.....

    The "WGM" title shouldnt even exist IMHO, "no offesnse to women"; I believe they are smart enough to compete w/ and be held to the same standard as the men.....


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