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How best to deter early knight advances without weakening position/losing time?


  • 19 months ago · Quote · #1

    J_Young598

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  • 19 months ago · Quote · #2

    PsYcHo_ChEsS


    Do you mean something like this? If so, your best course of action is to just develop your pieces as normal unless there's a threat to deal with. Once you castle and have a sound position you can choose to drive the knight away with a pawn move, but I would not make moves like h6 to prevent this.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #3

    tliu1222

    Are you talking about the Fried Liver? It's 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5

    It's one of the most feared attacks on chess.com

    Don't play 3. ...h6, as it's not stopping it.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #4

    FirebrandX

    I had a look at the OP's games. He's playing a garbage formation from the English opening with 2.e4, leaving outposts on b4 and d4 for black's c6-knight to exploit. As a result, he's been having to waste tempo playing a3 in order to clamp off the b4 outpost, but still has to worry about intrusions on d4.

    My advice would be for the OP to start going over master games in the English opening and learn what pawn structures should be played with it. If black plays 1...e5, learn the reversed dragon formation. You'll find that black's knight doesn't get to exploit holes in your camp when you play proper opening structures.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #5

    XCheck

    4.Ng5 wins a pawn, but black has little to fear; 4...d5 5.exd5 Na5 gives black good chances for his pawn. 

    Knight 'advances' in other lines simply waste time, and the other player can take advantage by constructing a lead in development, or using the tempi afforded by clumsy knights to make space-gaining moves.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #6

    J_Young598

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  • 19 months ago · Quote · #7

    J_Young598

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 19 months ago · Quote · #8

    J_Young598

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 19 months ago · Quote · #9

    Ziggy_Zugzwang

    I think these knight raids are often to trade for a bishop. The thing is,  does it  lose time and it may be that the loss of time is not worth it. Is the long term bishop pair worth the loss of time ? Well it depends on the position's charactestics !

    If the knight is in the proximity of the king should it be booted away ? ("To be or not to be that is the question " :-)  ). You just have to analyse it to be honest. I remember in his fantastic book "Logical Chess",the chapter the Kingside Attack, Irving Chernev was catagorical in not moving pawns in front of the castled king - the offending defender who tried to kick away a knight, bishop etc was punished by a timely sacrifice. Schematic thingking is useful and I remember following Chernev to the "T", but in retrospect, realise that chess (thankfully !) can't be pigeon holed - it all comes down to the demands of the position.

    Be mindful that your bounder of an opponent intent on irritating you with his knight insurgency might be brought to book with counter action elsewhere on the board ! :-)

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #10

    J_Young598

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 19 months ago · Quote · #11

    chessfreak800

    PsYcHo_ChEsS wrote:
     


    Do you mean something like this? If so, your best course of action is to just develop your pieces as normal unless there's a threat to deal with. Once you castle and have a sound position you can choose to drive the knight away with a pawn move, but I would not make moves like h6 to prevent this.

    well the knight has no useful  squares and the bishop is blocked from c4

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #12

    waffllemaster

    Bad moves hurt your opponent's position on their own.  Sometimes there happens to be a tactical punishment, but many times it doesn't take any special sequence to punish them.  Just play normal moves and you'll find they simply have a worse position.  Trying to immediately punish an unorthodox move is a beginner mistake.

    Although true, this advice isn't particularly useful.  As others said play over example games (master games) to get a sense for the middlegame plans for both sides and it will help the opening moves make more sense as well as help you know which moves are ignorable (the ones that aren't in keeping with the middlegame ideas).

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #13

    Estragon

    You only need to drive the invasive Knight back if there is a threat, now or next move, for instance Black plays ...Nb4 which threatens nothing, but if he can play ...Bf5 next move with a threat on c2 (or d3) that will cause problems, then you repulse the Knight with a3 first.  Otherwise, it's a one-piece attack and can often be ignored.  You should also look to the central squares this Knight no longer controls, they have been weakened and could become your next targets.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #14

    J_Young598

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 19 months ago · Quote · #15

    royalbishop

    How to deter early knight advances......?

    2 parts to this. Only the good advances should be prevented. If it advances and moves to the edge of the board you may be in a position to attack it later. Or maybe with it being at the edge you can attack the other side with more force in your favor. Or maybe the knight advance removes a defender to a square.  Or possible allows to you to exchange your useless knight for your opponents.

    So this is coming down to the situation on the board no matter which way you look at. Plus whenever you move a piece you weaken your position somewhere. Controlling the knight advance is the best way but you have to determine if that is what you want to focus on when you might a chance to win a piece or 2 pawns in the future.

    Plus are we talking in the Opening or the End Game?

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #16

    J_Young598

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