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How can i improve POSITIONAL understanding and picking CANDIDATE moves?


  • 17 months ago · Quote · #1

    Nizman

    I strongly feel that its lack of this quality that i am not improving.. How to come up with a solid plan is what i want to learn. I often succeed in developing my position into a very strong if not a winning position but just after that i beging to make inaccurate moves such that all my advantage evaporates, why? How do u choose candidate moves? is there a secret i dont know? How did u guys cross this annoying barrier in your chess improvement? Can someone help me especialy tittle members am sure u have encounterd this problem before..

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #2

    waffllemaster

    I highly recommend Pachman's Modern Chess Strategy and Soltis' Pawn Structure Chess.  Both are excellent books that will help you analyse the features of a position to come up with logical candidate moves.

    If you're losing from a winning position though it may have more to do with psychology (don't relax your concentration when winning) or tactical ability.

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #3

    tliu1222

    To come up with good moves, review these steps (and more, as I'm not so good at chess)-

    1-Look for tactics

    2-Look for developing moves. If you already are developed,

    3-KING SAFETY!

    4-Material

    5-Your plan

    6-Anybody help with this list?

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #4

    Nizman

    @basino i was not expecting the albin gambit since i know little about it.. And from the way u exploited my weeknesses that fast, i knew you have studied that opening and i had no chance plus my position turned into a hopless one so i had to swallow my pride and resign. Thanx guys although u are not getting me! I am not a beginner, am an advanced player i know how to evaluate a position but am talking about how to choose candidate moves

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #5

    WhitePointer

    ImBack-Muahahaha wrote:

    If you knew how to evaluate positions you would instinctively know candidate moves.

    Not necessarily. It is easy to see whether you have a good bishop or a bad bishop, or if your pawn structure is weak, or if your pieces are uncoordinated - Nizman probably wants a priorities list of which element in the position should be tended to first. Come to think of it, I'd really like one too...

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #6

    Mandy711

    It's not easy to answer your question without seeing the position. Perhaps you could post the game or the position. 

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #7

    waffllemaster

    WhitePointer wrote:
    ImBack-Muahahaha wrote:

    If you knew how to evaluate positions you would instinctively know candidate moves.

    Not necessarily. It is easy to see whether you have a good bishop or a bad bishop, or if your pawn structure is weak, or if your pieces are uncoordinated - Nizman probably wants a priorities list of which element in the position should be tended to first. Come to think of it, I'd really like one too...

    No such list exists.  The only thing that trumps all the others is king safety.  Everything else has to be judged on experience and calculation.

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #8

    SpeakMyLanguage

    Nizman wrote:

    I strongly feel that its lack of this quality that i am not improving.. How to come up with a solid plan is what i want to learn. I often succeed in developing my position into a very strong if not a winning position but just after that i beging to make inaccurate moves such that all my advantage evaporates, why? How do u choose candidate moves? is there a secret i dont know? How did u guys cross this annoying barrier in your chess improvement? Can someone help me especialy tittle members am sure u have encounterd this problem before..

    Mike Tyson said that the most prolific and devastating fighter is 'A HAPPY FIGHTER'. Miyamoto Musashi says that the focus of the eyes should be on nothing specific- your mind will do what it should and let the eyes fall where they, in kind, also should. Perhaps I better check all that and repost... Cool I'm saying that the most important weakness is internal: the game is really about not making mistakes and M Musashi definately talked a lot about sickness's of the mind and that even attempting to remove sickness from the mind was sickness itself. BOTTOMLINE IS WE ALL KNOW IT HURTS TO LOSE==>> THERE CAN NEVER BE ENOUGH PASSION IN CHESS, LOL!

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #9

    SpeakMyLanguage

    "..and M Musashi definately talked a lot about sickness's of the mind and that even attempting to remove ALL sickness from the mind was sickness itself..."(!FIXED)

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #10

    SpeakMyLanguage

    also, THE PLAN MEANS NOTHING!!

  • 13 months ago · Quote · #11

    beardogjones

    Nizman wrote:

    I strongly feel that its lack of this quality that i am not improving.. How to come up with a solid plan is what i want to learn. I often succeed in developing my position into a very strong if not a winning position but just after that i beging to make inaccurate moves such that all my advantage evaporates.

     

    You have answered your own question! Find those moves which gradually

    improve and expolit your advantage and the opponents disadvantage while minimizing the opponents counterplay. Soak the risk out of the

    position and then take your time with the final squeeze.

  • 12 months ago · Quote · #12

    SpeakMyLanguage

    THE TRANSFER OF ADVANTAGES...ask yourself: "What is my advantage?"


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