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How chess has developed.


  • 3 years ago · Quote · #1

    eleanor-the-great

    Chess was invented in the 6th Century in India during the Gupta reign but I was wondering how chess has developed since then. All I know is that you used to have to warn your opponent if you were attacking their Queen.

    Any other facts?  Maybe we could play a game that involves these rules?

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #2

    Crazychessplaya

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #3

    rickysharma

    chess is developed for making stretegies in war and they just make plans for set a trap in the war. they do demosntration at their place through chess.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #4

    eleanor-the-great

    Chess Players are also good at sport tactics as they can think moves ahead

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #5

    losingmove

    I heard that back in the day you could only moves pawns one square...even on their first move

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #6

    Greenmtnboy

    Thanks for the thread.

     

    Other points: the pieces had different associations as Iran was the place of origin, the "knight", "rook", "bishop" etc., were different, these have Western connotations.  In Asia there were different war animals and civil/military authorities of which chess provided symbolic transference.

     

    I wrote a piece, "The transmissibility of chess as a discipline" where I talked about the symbolic significance of the pieces and their associations, etc..  

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #7

    eleanor-the-great

    Thank you everyone for the response maybe we could as chess.com if we could try and play online! With the ancient rules.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #8

    Meadmaker

    Eleanor - the engine that drives chess.com won't let you play by the ancient rules.  However, if you can find a willing opponent, I know that Shatranj, the precursor of Chess in which pieces moved as described in this thread, is playable at iggamecenter.com, a free site.

    Several other historical chess variations are also available there.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #9

    pam234

    Very interesting forum Eleanor. Thankyou.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #10

    dashkee94

    I recently read a book that deals with this topic: Birth of the Chess Queen, by Marilyn Yalom.  It gives the history of chess and the names of the pieces (as well as their moves) of "normal" chess, as opposed to the changes that allowed the game to go nuclear ("Queen's" chess).  If you are interested in this thread, I believe you'd love this book.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #11

    topj

    it hasn't developed!  ;)

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #12

    AndyClifton

    Greenmtnboy wrote:

    I wrote a piece, "The transmissibility of chess as a discipline" where I talked about the symbolic significance of the pieces and their associations, etc..  

    uh-oh...

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #13

    Greenmtnboy

    Andy, thanks for that.  Actually my article had nothing to do with psychology.

    It discussed how the analytical tools of chess can be applied to other disciplines, and also talked about possible symbolic significance of the pieces and their relationships.  I'm sure there have been many people who have done much better. 

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #14

    Greenmtnboy

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #15

    eleanor-the-great

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 2 years ago · Quote · #16

    voldermort123

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 2 years ago · Quote · #17

    qixel

    Sam Sloan thinks chess was invented in China.  Just sayin'.

    Amy

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #18

    lobosolo21

    The powerful

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #19

    lobosolo21

    The powerful Queen was introduce in Italy in the 17th century.I read that.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #20

    Meadmaker

    Benefactor wrote:

    The powerful Queen was introduce in Italy in the 17th century.I read that.

    But it was wrong.  Chess of the Mad Queen was introduced no later than AD 1500, and rapidly spread through Europe.


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