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How Much Money Would It Take To Make You Give Up Chess?


  • 7 months ago · Quote · #121

    InDetention

    99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999$

    To give up chess. I truly KissLOVEKiss this game!

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #122

    Oscar_the_Cat

    I dont think you people are telling the truth ...  And if you are being honest, and give up an exorbitant  amount of money to make you and your family comfortable for the rest of your lives then you are a horrible, selfish person.

     

    Thanks for listening.  

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #123

    royalbishop

    Hey just a penny.  A penny more than the richest person.  Smile

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #124

    pocklecod

    I like chess as a hobby, so I'll value it at:

    (costs of getting involved in a new hobby to the same level I am involved in chess)

    +

    (costs already invested in chess)

    +

    (Maybe three hundred bucks for my trouble?)

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #125

    royalbishop

    The money ..... will it have a tax on it since it exchanges hands?

    Sure that has some of you cheap members changing your mind. Money Mouth

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #126

    nameno1had

    royalbishop wrote:

    The money ..... will it have a tax on it since it exchanges hands?

    Sure that has some of you cheap members changing your mind.

    Do you wanna know if you'll play all your games in Florida too, so that there is no state income tax ?

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #127

    royalbishop

    Aaaaaaah here comes all of chess.com to Florida.....

    ...... blame it on nameno1had.

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #128

    Kody_R

    whoa

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #129

    JoseO

    karate_gym wrote:

    I would give up chess, video games, and all my friends if somebody would hire me for a job. I'm broke!!

    Be careful what you ask for. You just might get it. There are not so nice jobs and you would not want to wind up with one of them.

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #130

    nameno1had

    a certain woman... and sorry chess... but, the right woman would play with me and enjoy it too...

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #131

    mmuurrii

    as much as i enjoy...chess, i would give it up for Love.  

    i no longer do things for money.

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #132

    winerkleiner

    Money IS great but love has it's place!

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #133

    bigpoison

    Ziryab wrote:
    MidnightExpress1 wrote:

    when you say the indigenous cultures of america dr. frank are you meaning Indian history. Surely there is precious little of that, being that the Indians had no written language. I mentioned to a friend your field and he was convinced you are into indigent studies, the study of the poor? what a silly man. please explain.

    I did not see Dr. Frank mention indigenous history. Perhaps you meant someone else. I address this question in my Pacific Northwest History class over the course of an hour or two. Here's a partial outline:

    Documentary Bias

    Traditional historiography constructs the story based on written documents

    primary, secondary, tertiary

    For a period of interaction between non-literate peoples and peoples with a text-based culture, the story will be slanted towards those with texts

    European culture is rooted in texts

    Indigenous Americans were non-literate

    Non-Literate Peoples

    In non-literate cultures the spoken word is primary and fully adequate

    non-literate means the culture is not print based; reading and writing are irrelevant

    Do not confuse non-literate with illiterate: illiteracy is the absence of necessary reading and writing skills in a print culture

    Sources of Native History

    1. Orature

    n.

    the stories, songs, legends, histories, tales, and the like that are communicated through voice; the collective record of a non-literate culture; a compound word derived from oral literature, but deemphasizing textual epistemology 

    Sources of Native History

    1. Orature

    A. Orature proper, or “true” orature

     

    True orature cannot be presented in a classroom. It exists only within a community of people that defines itself through stories that are voiced, rather than a society constructed through texts

    Sources of Native History

    1. Orature

    A. Orature proper, or “true” orature

    B. Orature artifacts, or records of orature

    i. textual record

    “The First Ship Seen by the Clatsop,” as told by Charles Cultee to Franz Boas, summer 1891, published 1894

    Barbara S. Efrat and W.J. Langlois, eds., “The Contact Period as Recorded by Indian Oral Traditions,” Sound Heritage 7 (1978), 54-61. 

    Sources of Native History

    1. Orature

    A. Orature proper, or “true” orature

    B. Orature artifacts, or records of orature

    i. textual record

    ii. sound recording

    Elizabeth Wilson’s “Walla Walla Poo Story,”

    13 minute audio recording.

    Walla Walla Poo Story

    Record your observations from Wilson’s story concerning:

    hunting

    traditional religious beliefs/religious change

    horses

    relationship to neighboring peoples

    language

    Sources . . .

    1. Orature

    2. Documents

    Examples of documents

    journals

    correspondence

    archived records

    Sources . . .

    1. Orature

    2. Documents

    A. documents of exploration

    i. journal of George Vancouver

    exercise in historical interpretation:

    Sources . . .

    1. Orature

    2. Documents

    A. documents of exploration

    i. journal of George Vancouver

    ii. journals of Lewis and Clark

    trade relations along lower Columbia

    Sources . . .

    1. Orature

    2. Documents

    A. documents of exploration

    B. documents of trade

    i. Alexander Ross, Adventures of the First Settlers on the Oregon or Columbia River

    beginnings of ethnographic description: Ross’s chapters 28-31 are among the first written descriptions of the customs of the Okanogan Peoples

    Sources . . .

    1. Orature

    2. Documents

    A. documents of exploration

    B. documents of trade

    i. Alexander Ross, The Fur Traders of the Far West

    ii. Edward Curtis’ photograph of Wishram woman

     

    Sources . . .

    1. Orature

    2. Documents

    A. documents of exploration

    B. documents of trade

    C. documents of missions

    i. Pierre DeSmet, maps (e.g. map of territory)

    ii. Nicolas Point, sketches

     

     

     

    Sources . . .

    1. Orature

    2. Documents

    A. documents of exploration

    B. documents of trade

    C. documents of missions

    D. documents of non-Indian settlement

     

    Sources . . .

    1. Orature

    2. Documents

    3. Material Culture

     

    Sources . . .

    1. Orature

    2. Documents

    3. Material Culture

    A. historical specimens

    i. NW Coast architecture

    ii. artifacts

    cedar hat acquired by Lewis and Clark

    link to Peabody Museum (Harvard)

    Sources . . .

    1. Orature

    2. Documents

    3. Material Culture

    A. historical specimens

    B. archaeological specimens

    i. The Ancient One?

    link to NPS site (Kennewick Man is Native American)

    Sources . . .

    1. Orature

    2. Documents

    3. Material Culture

    4. Ethnography

    A. classic

    B. contemporary

     

    Sources . . .

    1. Orature

    2. Documents

    3. Material Culture

    4. Ethnography

    A. classic

    i. notes on Vancouver’s enigmatic poles 

    Well, that's a bunch of boring stuff.  When do we get to potlatch, teach'?

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #134

    Ziryab

    bigpoison wrote:
    Ziryab wrote:
    MidnightExpress1 wrote:

    when you say the indigenous cultures of america dr. frank are you meaning Indian history. Surely there is precious little of that, being that the Indians had no written language. I mentioned to a friend your field and he was convinced you are into indigent studies, the study of the poor? what a silly man. please explain.

    I did not see Dr. Frank mention indigenous history. Perhaps you meant someone else. I address this question in my Pacific Northwest History class over the course of an hour or two. Here's a partial outline:

    Documentary Bias

    Traditional historiography constructs the story based on written documents

    primary, secondary, tertiary

    For a period of interaction between non-literate peoples and peoples with a text-based culture, the story will be slanted towards those with texts

    European culture is rooted in texts

    Indigenous Americans were non-literate

    Non-Literate Peoples

    In non-literate cultures the spoken word is primary and fully adequate

    non-literate means the culture is not print based; reading and writing are irrelevant

    Do not confuse non-literate with illiterate: illiteracy is the absence of necessary reading and writing skills in a print culture

    Sources of Native History

    1. Orature

    n.

    the stories, songs, legends, histories, tales, and the like that are communicated through voice; the collective record of a non-literate culture; a compound word derived from oral literature, but deemphasizing textual epistemology 

    Sources of Native History

    1. Orature

    A. Orature proper, or “true” orature

     

    True orature cannot be presented in a classroom. It exists only within a community of people that defines itself through stories that are voiced, rather than a society constructed through texts

    Sources of Native History

    1. Orature

    A. Orature proper, or “true” orature

    B. Orature artifacts, or records of orature

    i. textual record

    “The First Ship Seen by the Clatsop,” as told by Charles Cultee to Franz Boas, summer 1891, published 1894

    Barbara S. Efrat and W.J. Langlois, eds., “The Contact Period as Recorded by Indian Oral Traditions,” Sound Heritage 7 (1978), 54-61. 

    Sources of Native History

    1. Orature

    A. Orature proper, or “true” orature

    B. Orature artifacts, or records of orature

    i. textual record

    ii. sound recording

    Elizabeth Wilson’s “Walla Walla Poo Story,”

    13 minute audio recording.

    Walla Walla Poo Story

    Record your observations from Wilson’s story concerning:

    hunting

    traditional religious beliefs/religious change

    horses

    relationship to neighboring peoples

    language

    Sources . . .

    1. Orature

    2. Documents

    Examples of documents

    journals

    correspondence

    archived records

    Sources . . .

    1. Orature

    2. Documents

    A. documents of exploration

    i. journal of George Vancouver

    exercise in historical interpretation:

    Sources . . .

    1. Orature

    2. Documents

    A. documents of exploration

    i. journal of George Vancouver

    ii. journals of Lewis and Clark

    trade relations along lower Columbia

    Sources . . .

    1. Orature

    2. Documents

    A. documents of exploration

    B. documents of trade

    i. Alexander Ross, Adventures of the First Settlers on the Oregon or Columbia River

    beginnings of ethnographic description: Ross’s chapters 28-31 are among the first written descriptions of the customs of the Okanogan Peoples

    Sources . . .

    1. Orature

    2. Documents

    A. documents of exploration

    B. documents of trade

    i. Alexander Ross, The Fur Traders of the Far West

    ii. Edward Curtis’ photograph of Wishram woman

     

    Sources . . .

    1. Orature

    2. Documents

    A. documents of exploration

    B. documents of trade

    C. documents of missions

    i. Pierre DeSmet, maps (e.g. map of territory)

    ii. Nicolas Point, sketches

     

     

     

    Sources . . .

    1. Orature

    2. Documents

    A. documents of exploration

    B. documents of trade

    C. documents of missions

    D. documents of non-Indian settlement

     

    Sources . . .

    1. Orature

    2. Documents

    3. Material Culture

     

    Sources . . .

    1. Orature

    2. Documents

    3. Material Culture

    A. historical specimens

    i. NW Coast architecture

    ii. artifacts

    cedar hat acquired by Lewis and Clark

    link to Peabody Museum (Harvard)

    Sources . . .

    1. Orature

    2. Documents

    3. Material Culture

    A. historical specimens

    B. archaeological specimens

    i. The Ancient One?

    link to NPS site (Kennewick Man is Native American)

    Sources . . .

    1. Orature

    2. Documents

    3. Material Culture

    4. Ethnography

    A. classic

    B. contemporary

     

    Sources . . .

    1. Orature

    2. Documents

    3. Material Culture

    4. Ethnography

    A. classic

    i. notes on Vancouver’s enigmatic poles 

    Well, that's a bunch of boring stuff.  When do we get to potlatch, teach'?

    It's in there if you know where to look:

    i. NW Coast architecture

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #135

    maheshroks

    if u agree to buy it back for 50$ after giving me 100$

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #136

    AlCzervik

    karate_gym wrote:

    I would give up chess, video games, and all my friends if somebody would hire me for a job. I'm broke!!

    I think the guy that is selling all the fake passports is hiring.  He's always gone real soon after posting a thread about it, so I assume he's really busy.

  • 7 months ago · Quote · #137

    I-eat-guini-pigs

    AlCzervik wrote:
    karate_gym wrote:

    I would give up chess, video games, and all my friends if somebody would hire me for a job. I'm broke!!

    I think the guy that is selling all the fake passports is hiring.  He's always gone real soon after posting a thread about it, so I assume he's really busy.

    lol true =)


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