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How to improve chess game????


  • 18 months ago · Quote · #1

    Nathalie_B

    tell me please....

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #2

    MrDamonSmith

    I really think it depends on your weaknesses. You have to be honest about that. And of course on your level of play. Example: an expert wanting to get to master level wouldn't study the same things a beginner would trying to get to 1000 level.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #3

    Nathalie_B

    MrDamonSmith wrote:

    I really think it depends on your weaknesses. You have to be honest about that. And of course on your level of play. Example: an expert wanting to get to master level wouldn't study the same things a beginner would trying to get to 1000 level.

    Thank you very much MrDamonSmile

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #4

    Lawdoginator

    Analyze each game you play. That works for me. Eventually, you keep eliminating more and more of the mistakes that you usually make. 

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #5

    MrDamonSmith

    I know my openings are by far the weakest part of my game because I've never took time to seriously study them. I've considered it sooo boring. I've always liked middlegame books and a few endgame ones. But now I realise I have to start learning some openings, as much as I don't want to

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #6

    ivandh

    If you posted a game or two we could have some idea of specifically what could be improved.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #7

    MrDamonSmith

    Yes about learning from your games. It would help to get someone much higher rated to help annotate them with you. But it has to be the kind of player that can explain things in a simple, common sense way. I think positional players explain things better than tactical players if you're trying to find a good teacher.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #8

    campbellh

    There are lots of resources to improve. One, study openings (chess openings.com). Tactics practice is a good thing to study (chesstempo.com). Find a coach, or a club to join. Read books. But, the best is actual playing a person sitting across a board from you.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #9

    Nathalie_B

    campbellh wrote:

    There are lots of resources to improve. One, study openings (chess openings.com). Tactics practice is a good thing to study (chesstempo.com). Find a coach, or a club to join. Read books. But, the best is actual playing a person sitting across a board from you.

    Thank you cambellhWink

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #10

    Nathalie_B

    Lawdoginator wrote:

    Analyze each game you play. That works for me. Eventually, you keep eliminating more and more of the mistakes that you usually make. 

    Thank you Lawdoginator...i am appreciate your suggestion

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #11

    MrDamonSmith

    Really, as a general overall strategy for long term true chess strength study endgames so well you know them inside out. Just simple, basic positions. Nothing fancy. Also pawn structures over and over. Study a book that explains tactics, the mechanics of them, the building blocks of them. You don't need to memorize openings. You do those 3 things and learn them thoroughly you will become a beast on the chessboard. I wish I could start all over, I would've done those first.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #12

    campbellh

    I just looked at your rating. I would say you are pretty good already. Study the old masters. They have much to teach a newer generation.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #13

    PedoneMedio

    Opinions about this topic which are/were shared by the most experienced instructors and GMs (i.e. it's not the advice of poor-patzer-me):

     

    Force yourself to keep your emotions neutral, so to be able to look at the position with objectivity, and always play the most active safe moves ("most active": gives the most mobility to your pieces if compared with the opponent's; "safe": never forget to look for Checks, Captures and Threats, neither yours nor your opponent's). When winning, stop the opponent's counterplay before you proceed with your attack (D.Heisman says: "think defence first, when winning", which doesn't mean to play defensively, but to consolidate your advantage by depriving the opponent of any possible play of his/her own which might be left on the board at that moment).

    Play a lot on long time control games, and analyze all the games you played, or at least all the games you lost (i.e. analyze at least untill you find and understand the error which costed the game, and see to what extent your moves in the opening were correct according to theory).

    Also, practice tactics (almost) daily with puzzles which are not too difficult: you want to permanently ingrain common tactical motives into your intuition, so that during games your calculation can be faster and your alertness to tactics more sensitive.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #14

    TheBishop35

    Hi Nathalie. I find the learning sites best...chesstempo or chess magnet school are good for tactics. Let me know if you want help in finding your way around them Smile  Paul Kiss

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #15

    Vandarringa

    For everyone under 2000, and even others above that, the best advice is to study and drill tactics.  Tactics are relevant at all stagesof the game and at all levels of play.  The two most important skills to develop are pattern recognition and a disciplined thought process that avoids tactical blunders.

    Just recall how you won or lost your last 5 games.  Have you lost lots of games in long endgames where an opponent exploited your poorer pawn structure or piece mobility?  Probably not.  At my level, I'm happy to lose a game like that, because most of my losses are due to tactical blunders where I unwittingly give up the exchange,  or a piece, or don't see a threat to my king.  Likewise, most of my wins are due to exploiting a tactical error the opponent has made.

    Masters win and lose games through positional means all the time, but you don't get there until you are able to spot tactical threats consistently and reliably.  All masters are tactical players: even "positional players" have to be able to spot dangerous tactics over the board to avoid blundering.

    Again, tactics tactics tactics.  At least a few problems a day if you can't get a game in every day.  And by game, I don't mean blitz, but standard time controls.  Give yourself time to think in order to practice visualization.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #16

    netzach

    Study QGD and white's play against Indian defences.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #17

    PrivatePyle99

    Check out the Novice Nook articles on danheisman.com.  They're really good.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #18

    NimzoRoy

    First try to figure out what learning methods are best and worst for you. Some players prefer watching videos, others would rather read a book or article and this just scratches the surface. In general there are 3 ways to learn: by reading, by oral instruction and by doing. I don't think most of us can improve much at chess stricty by "doing" ie playing and never studying or training.

    chess.com members IM Jeremy Silman and NM Dan Heisman have written many articles to help beginners and intermediate players improve their game. I've written a few too which may be helpful to start out with

    http://www.chess.com/blog/NimzoRoy/endgame-books?_domain=old_blog_host&_parent=old_frontend_blog_view

    http://www.chess.com/blog/NimzoRoy/beginner-chess-book-recommendations

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #19

    maDawson

    One thing I noticed is that most of the higher rated players won't give out of the box answers such as..."focus on tactics". They will emphasis you to actually break down your personal game and find your own flaws. Also reading is crucial, and forming a structured learning plan is important. Go slow, be patient and consistent.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #20

    Nathalie_B

    TheBishop35 wrote:

    Hi Nathalie. I find the learning sites best...chesstempo or chess magnet school are good for tactics. Let me know if you want help in finding your way around them   Paul

    Thank you very much Paul Smile for your information


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