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i can't escape chess but i must!


  • 11 months ago · #281

    Dischyzer

    Serious A$$ didgeridoo.

  • 11 months ago · #282

    chess_gg

    Some scientist needs to explain to spectators Einstein's relativity theory. Before his explanation, he says: 'I have to suffer a lot explaining something I don't understand myself.' This relates to my game: I didn't understand anything! (on losing to Magnus Carlsen at the 2011 Sao Paolo/Bilbao tournament) - Vasily Ivanchuk

  • 11 months ago · #283

    chess_gg

    No Chess Grandmaster is normal; they only differ in the extent of their madness.  -  Victor Kortchnoi

  • 11 months ago · #284

    Dischyzer

    Weren't we posting about beautiful woman and love . . . 

  • 11 months ago · #285

    Dischyzer

    They could be complete chess newbies and I'd still lose the game.

  • 10 months ago · #286

    VeeranChess

    Don't try to quit playing chess. I tried so many times and failed.  Instead try to study chess.  I consider about.com is good for beginners to learn chess. In the long run, you may reduce your time playing chess

  • 10 months ago · #287

    bolshevikhellraiser

    I hate to be the one to break the news but your wife wants a divorce and your children no longer love you due to your negligence. I recommend filing a life insurance policy and jumping off a bridge. That's the only redemption I can see you deadbeat.

  • 10 months ago · #288

    ilikeflags

    you're still trying?

  • 10 months ago · #289

    linuxblue1

    Maybe Belinda Carlisle has the answer to escape chess:

  • 10 months ago · #290

    ilikeflags

    you guys ever had a crunchie?  dude, they're so good.

  • 10 months ago · #291

    TheGrobe

    Are they not common in the US?

  • 10 months ago · #292

    ilikeflags

    you can find 'em but only at international markets.  we get them fairly often.  once a month or so.  

  • 10 months ago · #293

    Dischyzer

    I love crunchies when I can find them. I've actually made my own honeycomb candy and coated . . . no . . . enrobed them in chocolate. Totally different proccess.

    Honeycomb cannot be left out in the open for any extended length of time, as it will draw moisture from the air and become a sticky, soggy mess. To prevent this, it should be stored in baggies within airtight containers. Dipping the candies in chocolate helps, and the chocolate-dipped candies will last several days, although it is best eaten soon after it is made.

    You can control the thickness of the honeycomb by selecting a pan size based on your preference. If you use an 11x17 pan, the honeycomb will be approximately ¼” thick, while a 13x9 pan yields a ½” candy and an 8x8 pan produces an even thicker honeycomb.

    Prep Time: 25 minutes

    Total Time: 25 minutes

    Ingredients:

    • 1/4 cup honey
    • 1/2 cup light corn syrup
    • 2 cups granulated sugar
    • 1 generous tbsp baking soda
    • 1/4 cup water
    • 12 ounces dark chocolate
    • 2 tbsp shortening

    Preparation:

    1. Prepare a rimmed baking sheet by lining it with aluminum foil and spraying the foil with nonstick cooking spray.

    2. Combine the sugar, corn syrup, honey, and ¼ cup water in a large saucepan. You want to use a saucepan large enough so that the mixture can triple in size and still be safely contained. Stir the ingredients together until the sugar is completely moistened. Using a wet pastry brush, wipe the sides of the saucepan to remove any stray sugar crystals.

    3. Insert a candy thermometer and cook the mixture over medium-high heat, without stirring, until the temperature reaches 300 degrees.

    4. Once the candy is at the proper temperature, remove it from the heat and add the baking soda all at once. Immediately whisk the candy to incorporate the baking soda, and be careful—it will foam up a great deal!

    5. As soon as the baking soda is incorporated, pour the candy carefully onto the prepared sheet.

    6. Allow it to cool and harden completely, then break it into small pieces. Honeycomb can be eaten as-is, or you can dip it in chocolate:

    7. Combine the chocolate and shortening in a microwave-safe bowl, and microwave it to melt the chocolate completely, stirring every minute. Note that the amount of chocolate required may vary depending on how thick you made your honeycomb and how many pieces you made.

    8. Using two forks, dip the individual pieces in chocolate so that they are completely covered, and replace them on the baking sheet. Repeat with remaining honeycomb and refrigerate until chocolate is set. Best enjoyed within 24 hours.

  • 10 months ago · #294

    AlCzervik

    Crunchies could be the answer. Feed 'em to your family when you want to play.

  • 10 months ago · #295

    ilikeflags

    last 2 posts win forever.  FOREVER!  how's that for fear?

  • 10 months ago · #296

    Dischyzer

     . . . .most important part,

    it is best eaten soon after it is made.

  • 10 months ago · #297

    ilikeflags

    staff.  please close this thread.  it's finished.

  • 10 months ago · #298

    Dischyzer

    Scrunchies?

  • 10 months ago · #299

    ilikeflags

    AlCzervik wrote:

    Crunchies could be the answer. Feed 'em to your family when you want to play.

    winner

  • 10 months ago · #300

    ilikeflags

    Dischyzer wrote:

    I love crunchies when I can find them. I've actually made my own honeycomb candy and coated . . . no . . . enrobed them in chocolate. Totally different proccess.

    Honeycomb cannot be left out in the open for any extended length of time, as it will draw moisture from the air and become a sticky, soggy mess. To prevent this, it should be stored in baggies within airtight containers. Dipping the candies in chocolate helps, and the chocolate-dipped candies will last several days, although it is best eaten soon after it is made.

    You can control the thickness of the honeycomb by selecting a pan size based on your preference. If you use an 11x17 pan, the honeycomb will be approximately ¼” thick, while a 13x9 pan yields a ½” candy and an 8x8 pan produces an even thicker honeycomb.

    Prep Time: 25 minutes Total Time: 25 minutesIngredients: 1/4 cup honey 1/2 cup light corn syrup 2 cups granulated sugar 1 generous tbsp baking soda 1/4 cup water 12 ounces dark chocolate 2 tbsp shortening Preparation:

    1. Prepare a rimmed baking sheet by lining it with aluminum foil and spraying the foil with nonstick cooking spray.

    2. Combine the sugar, corn syrup, honey, and ¼ cup water in a large saucepan. You want to use a saucepan large enough so that the mixture can triple in size and still be safely contained. Stir the ingredients together until the sugar is completely moistened. Using a wet pastry brush, wipe the sides of the saucepan to remove any stray sugar crystals.

    3. Insert a candy thermometer and cook the mixture over medium-high heat, without stirring, until the temperature reaches 300 degrees.

    4. Once the candy is at the proper temperature, remove it from the heat and add the baking soda all at once. Immediately whisk the candy to incorporate the baking soda, and be careful—it will foam up a great deal!

    5. As soon as the baking soda is incorporated, pour the candy carefully onto the prepared sheet.

    6. Allow it to cool and harden completely, then break it into small pieces. Honeycomb can be eaten as-is, or you can dip it in chocolate:

    7. Combine the chocolate and shortening in a microwave-safe bowl, and microwave it to melt the chocolate completely, stirring every minute. Note that the amount of chocolate required may vary depending on how thick you made your honeycomb and how many pieces you made.

    8. Using two forks, dip the individual pieces in chocolate so that they are completely covered, and replace them on the baking sheet. Repeat with remaining honeycomb and refrigerate until chocolate is set. Best enjoyed within 24 hours.

    winner.  quit while you're ahead.


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