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I can't wait for my first offical OTB tournament.


  • 17 months ago · Quote · #41

    Estragon

    15cm wrote:

    @estragon

    According to my club members, I would get around 2000, thats what I aim.

    should I join in Open section or U2100 or u 1900?

    For your first tournament, I would recommend you enter the lowest class for which you are eligible, except that as an unrated player with some experience you should not go lower than Under 1400, say - avoid an Under 1200 or lower section. 

    The worst that will happen is you win all your games.  But don't be cocky, tournament play is serious for most players and you should not expect any easy wins.  Playing in a big event in an Under 2100 section is a pretty tall order.

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #42

    BishopCannons

    .

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #43

    BishopCannons

    .

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #44

    waffllemaster

    BishopCannons wrote:
    waffllemaster wrote:
    15cm wrote:

    @bishopcannons, I did not know that I have to say 'check' when I check my opponent's king.

    I believe being an asian gives me an advantage due to my small eyes my opponent won't see where I am looking.

    I will definetly take shower with cold water in the morning before the tournament.

    Thank you so much for your looooooooooooooooooong adivce.

    You do not have to say check, it is not in the rules. 

    And after many tournaments I've never even seen a player say check.  I didn't read his loooooong post... maybe he was being funny or something, but to be clear it's not required and no one says it (even in clubs).

       Yes it is.

    Maybe in unofficial scholastic tournaments put together by teachers?  I can't imagine why you think it's in the USCF or FIDE rules though... because it isn't.

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #45

    LoveYouSoMuch

    when people say "check" to me in an otb game, i just smile and proceed to crush that naive person somewhat mercifully, saying "check" when i give check too because surely that person is just misguided

    enlightenment should come after the game though - just politely explain "no, you don't have to say check EVERYTHING YOU KNOW IS WRONG"

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #46

    Estragon

    waffllemaster wrote:
    BishopCannons wrote:
    waffllemaster wrote:
    15cm wrote:

    @bishopcannons, I did not know that I have to say 'check' when I check my opponent's king.

    I believe being an asian gives me an advantage due to my small eyes my opponent won't see where I am looking.

    I will definetly take shower with cold water in the morning before the tournament.

    Thank you so much for your looooooooooooooooooong adivce.

    You do not have to say check, it is not in the rules. 

    And after many tournaments I've never even seen a player say check.  I didn't read his loooooong post... maybe he was being funny or something, but to be clear it's not required and no one says it (even in clubs).

       Yes it is.

    Maybe in unofficial scholastic tournaments put together by teachers?  I can't imagine why you think it's in the USCF or FIDE rules though... because it isn't.

    Isn't - and never was in any codified version of the rules. 

    I suspect that IF this person has ever been to an OTB tournament it was by escaping the group trip to the zoo and wandering in.

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #47

    AssauIt

    Ok, if you want to get all technical, no you do not HAVE to say check.

    Just like how you Do not HAVE to stop at the traffic lights for pederstrians.

    It is just very rude not to.

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #48

    MrDamonSmith

    I was kidding when I said to say check so anyone can hear it 30 paces away. Also the part about staring at your opponent for a long time.....and about the farting and all.... No, nobody says check unless they're a beginner or some street player or prison player that's never played a tournament and never will. You know, the kind that make up absolutely retarded rules From the hood just to help themselves because they're not any good at chess and never will be.
  • 17 months ago · Quote · #49

    TheGreatOogieBoogie

    Estragon wrote:
    15cm wrote:

    @estragon

    According to my club members, I would get around 2000, thats what I aim.

    should I join in Open section or U2100 or u 1900?

    For your first tournament, I would recommend you enter the lowest class for which you are eligible, except that as an unrated player with some experience you should not go lower than Under 1400, say - avoid an Under 1200 or lower section. 

    The worst that will happen is you win all your games.  But don't be cocky, tournament play is serious for most players and you should not expect any easy wins.  Playing in a big event in an Under 2100 section is a pretty tall order.

    I imagine that U1200 sections are nearly all children who are actually good.  Being in that category means you know not to trade a passive rook for a more active one and not trading away your lightsquared bishop if your pawns are fixed on darksquares if you can help it since bishops defend weak squares in their territory.

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #50

    ThrillerFan

    MrDamonSmith wrote:

    Also, when you castle make sure you move your KING first then the rook. If you touch your rook first you'll have to move it only. That IS in the rule book now, just so you'll know.

    And when you check your opponent you HAVE to say CHECK! loud enough for anyone with normal hearing to be able to hear it 30 paces away. That's standard. If you're about to capture en passant you have to tell your opponent before you do it and again after you've completed the move or else you'll be penalized on the clock. That's standard.

    And farting is more socially acceptable in chess tournaments.

    Don't listen to this bumbling idiot.

    Do keep a few things in mind though:

    1) When you Castle, do move your King first

    2) DO NOT verbally say check.  It's distracting to all players, opponent included.

    3) KNOW THE RULES!  Ones that many players don't know include:

       A) If a piece is touched, it must be moved, provided there is a "legal move".  Not "Sensible move", just "Legal".  This includes if you make an illegal move.  Your opponent won't announce check.  You must observe that you are in check.  If your Queen is on d6, your King on g8, and White goes Ba2+ (from b1), and you touch your queen, and go Qb6, then when your opponent calls for an illegal move, if you have a legal Queen move, like Qe6, you must play it!

       B) All illegal action requires that you stop the clock and get a director.  Don't try to resolve it yourself.  If your opponent makes an illegal move, state "I need to stop the clock to get a director" and then stop it and get a director.  Don't resolve the issue yourself.

       C) If you are making a draw claim, don't hit the clock.  If your opponent's clock (or delay) runs even a microsecond, you lose all rights to claim a draw.  If the move you are about to make leads to 3-fold repetition or the 50 move rule applies, STATE THE MOVE (don't make the move) and state the claim, and then stop the clock, find out if the opponent acknowledges.  If so, great, draw is the result.  If not, you get a director.  So for example, if 47...Be2 is 3-fold repetition, then you say "I play Be2 and claim 3 fold repetition."  You can make the move if you want, but then you have to be super-careful with the clock that you strictly stop it, not start his.  That's why the verbal approach is safer.

       D) If you are going to offer a draw, do it at the right time.  That is, let's say you want to offer a draw in response to your 33rd move.  Let's say your 33rd move is 33...d5.  You push the pawn to d5, say "I offer you a draw", and then hit the clock.  You can get penalized for offering draws during your opponent's time, and if you offer a draw on your turn and haven't made your move yet, your opponent isn't obligated to immediately accept or decline.  He has until he makes his own next move, and I personally NEVER accept or decline a draw until after my opponent's move is made.  He could blunder.

       E) Keep notation as long as possible.  While you are allowed to stop notating when you are under 5 minutes in the sudden death time control (provided there isn't an increment of 30 seconds or more), if you do stop, you lose the ability to claim 3-fold repetition or 50 moves with no capture or pawn move.

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #51

    MrDamonSmith

    That's why I mentioned it was all kidding. I wanted to make that clear. I was expanding on a previous poster telling him to stare at his opponent.

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #52

    73rRyan73

    ive got tourney 2 weeks time if i win all 6 games i get Money Mouth£100

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #53

    JamieKowalski

    Don't say "check." Just don't. It's not necessary, and it's slightly annoying.

    Do make sure you understand how to set and adjust your clock. Do arrive early to your seat. Do make sure you have a score sheet and a pencil or two. Do read over any special tournament-specific rules that may be set up. Turn your phone completely off, or leave it in your room or car. Get lots of sleep, and keep a few snacks with you, if allowed.

    On the matter of bathroom breaks, during a long game, you're going to have to go. Maybe even a few times. If you feel even the slightest need, get up and go before moving (clock time permitting). 

    One more thing I never do without: earplugs. When I play, I want to shut out EVERYTHING besides the game in front of me. It's not that I can't concentrate when I hear noises, it's that I concentrate better when I don't. It may not make a difference to you, but it's worth giving it a try. 

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #54

    michael101800

    MrDamonSmith wrote:

    Also, when you castle make sure you move your KING first then the rook. If you touch your rook first you'll have to move it only. That IS in the rule book now, just so you'll know.

    And when you check your opponent you HAVE to say CHECK! loud enough for anyone with normal hearing to be able to hear it 30 paces away. That's standard. If you're about to capture en passant you have to tell your opponent before you do it and again after you've completed the move or else you'll be penalized on the clock. That's standard.

    And farting is more socially acceptable in chess tournaments.

    You don't have to say check at a high level like where i'm at unless there's different rules in your place.

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #55

    MrDamonSmith

    That post was a joke, I mentioned that several posts ago. The OP got it.

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #56

    bcoburn2

    I agree with those who suggest starting at the lowest level. Remember

    OTB players are not there for a "fun" game like online. They are there

    to whip your butt. They study books and have positions they wish to lead

    you into. Think. Find the best move - then look for a better one.You are

    going into battle.

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #57

    kinghunter75

    wafflemaster is right, USCF rule #12f under "Rules of Play": "Announcing check is not required, and is rare in high-level tournaments. It is the responsibility of the opponent to notice the check, and a player who does not may suffer serious consequences. A play may announce check."

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #58

    Irontiger

    AssauIt wrote:

    Ok, if you want to get all technical, no you do not HAVE to say check.

    Just like how you Do not HAVE to stop at the traffic lights for pederstrians.

    It is just very rude not to.

    Unless you are living in a very strange country, you do have to stop at the traffic lights... Undecided

    Saying check can be done, but avoid it when you expect to say it more than 3 moves in a row. Queen endgames would become a hell for the other tables.

    Oh, and say it, don't shout it, too.

  • 17 months ago · Quote · #59

    TetsuoShima

    Irontiger wrote:
    AssauIt wrote:

    Ok, if you want to get all technical, no you do not HAVE to say check.

    Just like how you Do not HAVE to stop at the traffic lights for pederstrians.

    It is just very rude not to.

    Unless you are living in a very strange country, you do have to stop at the traffic lights... 

    Saying check can be done, but avoid it when you expect to say it more than 3 moves in a row. Queen endgames would become a hell for the other tables.

    Oh, and say it, don't shout it, too.


    that would be quite funny.

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #60

    BishopCannons

    15cm wrote:

    Time to get a USCF rating. :)

    See you guys on Manhattan open

      So how did it go?  I can't find any tournament results for the Manhattan Open.  Was it cancelled?


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