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I hate chess.


  • 2 years ago · Quote · #101

    nameno1had

    CaptJackAubrey wrote:
    dashofchutmeg wrote:

    Nothing has ever frustrated me the way chess frustrates me. In the span of about 15 games, I've lost what... 13? And every time I want to put my fist through a wall.

     

    Does anyone else feel like beating the piss out of something when they play? Because I hate this ****ing game.

    I think we get so ticked off when we lose because in most cases we realize that we could have won. I do get upset sometimes, especially when my opponent uses something like the Parham or some other silly Queen led offense. Sadly, at my level of play I run into this all the time.

    Chess reminds me of golf. When I used to play golf I wasn't great but I had moments. The rest of the time was a pursuit of more of those moments. I find chess, for me, to be similar. I hate losing but find winning very exhilirating so I keep playing in pursuit of the next exhilirating win. Such extasy all the sweeter when I beat someone who has opened with the Parham! ;)

    I wish I could play golf as well as I do chess. If I could just not slice, I would probably shoot between par and 85 everytime.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #102

    deep1999

    chess is just my hobby and timepass whenever imbored i just play chess

    i just dont madly!! hate or love chess. !    but this is a good way of passing time anyway.....  




    Tongue outInnocent    I DONT HATE CHESS!!!!!!!!!

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #103

    Krushervitzky

    I must say that I hate this accursed game of chess more than anything I have ever hated in my whole life. Its vile terror and sheer butchery mirrors the evil and pernicious vicissitudes of this painful and damned life on this forsaken planet, and as such I despise chess above all things. What makes it even more offensive is the fact that unfortunately it is so addictive. I really wish that this game would be erased forever and permanently eviscerated from the collective memory and history of mankind. May all the ancient plagues haunt its inventors through the darkest regions of Hell, if there ever was such a thing.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #104

    wik8

    the reason we all "hate chess" when we lose a game is because there is nothing to blame but ourselves.  chess is played entirely in good faith; when we win, we played the better game and when we lose, we made the critical mistakes.  there is no 'lucky card' or 'fortunate chance.'  it takes time to adjust to being entirely in charge of one's own fortunes as most games are not like this.  but it is also the thing that makes chess satisfying and rewarding.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #105

    Fear_ItseIf

    Krushervitzky wrote:

    I must say that I hate this accursed game of chess more than anything I have ever hated in my whole life. Its vile terror and sheer butchery mirrors the evil and pernicious vicissitudes of this painful and damned life on this forsaken planet, and as such I despise chess above all things. What makes it even more offensive is the fact that unfortunately it is so addictive. I really wish that this game would be erased forever and permanently eviscerated from the collective memory and history of mankind. May all the ancient plagues haunt its inventors through the darkest regions of Hell, if there ever was such a thing.

    lol...

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #106

    Maplo

    wik8 wrote:

    the reason we all "hate chess" when we lose a game is because there is nothing to blame but ourselves.  chess is played entirely in good faith; when we win, we played the better game and when we lose, we made the critical mistakes.  there is no 'lucky card' or 'fortunate chance.'  it takes time to adjust to being entirely in charge of one's own fortunes as most games are not like this.  but it is also the thing that makes chess satisfying and rewarding.

    I would have to disagree to an extent, as there is plenty of luck in chess. I always play Blitz on this site, and often "get away" with it when my opponent tries a combination which I had not even considered (but which I would have considered if I had noticed it), but which turns out to be unsound. Conversely, I am sure the opposite happens when an opponent of mine fails to consider one of my combinations, but nevertheless manages to find a saving resource.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #107

    wik8

    Maplo wrote:
    wik8 wrote:

    the reason we all "hate chess" when we lose a game is because there is nothing to blame but ourselves.  chess is played entirely in good faith; when we win, we played the better game and when we lose, we made the critical mistakes.  there is no 'lucky card' or 'fortunate chance.'  it takes time to adjust to being entirely in charge of one's own fortunes as most games are not like this.  but it is also the thing that makes chess satisfying and rewarding.

    I would have to disagree to an extent, as there is plenty of luck in chess. I always play Blitz on this site, and often "get away" with it when my opponent tries a combination which I had not even considered (but which I would have considered if I had noticed it), but which turns out to be unsound. Conversely, I am sure the opposite happens when an opponent of mine fails to consider one of my combinations, but nevertheless manages to find a saving resource.

     when your opponent plays a combination that is unsound and you exploit it, that is not a question of luck but of skill. 

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #108

    Maplo

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 23 months ago · Quote · #109

    Maplo

    wik8 wrote:
    Maplo wrote:
    wik8 wrote:

    the reason we all "hate chess" when we lose a game is because there is nothing to blame but ourselves.  chess is played entirely in good faith; when we win, we played the better game and when we lose, we made the critical mistakes.  there is no 'lucky card' or 'fortunate chance.'  it takes time to adjust to being entirely in charge of one's own fortunes as most games are not like this.  but it is also the thing that makes chess satisfying and rewarding.

    I would have to disagree to an extent, as there is plenty of luck in chess. I always play Blitz on this site, and often "get away" with it when my opponent tries a combination which I had not even considered (but which I would have considered if I had noticed it), but which turns out to be unsound. Conversely, I am sure the opposite happens when an opponent of mine fails to consider one of my combinations, but nevertheless manages to find a saving resource.

     when your opponent plays a combination that is unsound and you exploit it, that is not a question of luck but of skill. 

    Yes, of course I would deserve some credit for exploiting it. But, sometimes I give a sigh of relief, because I had never even considered the possibility of his move (even though I should have), but managed to get away with my oversight.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #110

    shepi13

    I hate when I calculate a complicated win for my opponent, then after thinking for about 30 more minutes they see it and beat me. Don't I get credit for calculating it first? Cry

     

    And when you calculate a five move relatively forced entry to the ending where you sac a pawn and your opponent ends up with the worst pawn structure ever seen. So you play an inaccuracy on move 5, go into this long line, and realize at the end that your opponent has two bishops for two knights and has the activity for an easy win.



  • 23 months ago · Quote · #111

    kgpatrick21

    Having an alcoholic beverage does wonders while playing chess. At least it does for me. You don't think in circles and don't get as frustrated after a blunder. Hit the resign button and keep the games coming.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #112

    dashofchutmeg

    wik8 wrote:

    the reason we all "hate chess" when we lose a game is because there is nothing to blame but ourselves.  chess is played entirely in good faith; when we win, we played the better game and when we lose, we made the critical mistakes.  there is no 'lucky card' or 'fortunate chance.'  it takes time to adjust to being entirely in charge of one's own fortunes as most games are not like this.  but it is also the thing that makes chess satisfying and rewarding.

    This is exactly right. What I've tried to explain to a friend (re: my anger in losing to an evenly-matched opponent) is that I have all of the information available to me and still throw the game away. It's frustration with my brain, not the game itself. The game is artful and magical and beautiful all at once. My brain is weak and stupid and makes my hands do stupid things with the pieces.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #113

    akumumasochist

    that was very entertaining to read, as well as a bit informational.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #114

    AndyClifton

    wik8 wrote:
     when your opponent plays a combination that is unsound and you exploit it, that is not a question of luck but of skill. 

    This is a circular argument.

    Also note that that lucky card can act as a salve or balm to your conscience as well.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #115

    DaBigOne

    I hate people who hate chess.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #116

    wbilfc

    I hate people who hate people who hate chess.

     

    Should there be a whom in there somewhere? I can never work that one out!  :0)

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #117

    Maplo

    wbilfc wrote:

    I hate people who hate people who hate chess.

     

    Should there be a whom in there somewhere? I can never work that one out!  :0)

    Your sentence is correct. It should only be "whom" if the people are having something done to them, not if they are the doers, e.g. "I feel sorry for people WHO hate chess and WHOM are therefore themselves hated by others."

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #118

    shepi13

    I feel sorry for people who hate chess and whom are therefore themselves hated by others who hate people who hate chess who hate people who hate people who hate chess. Ok?

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #119

    shepi13

    To explain my previous statement a diagram might be needed Laughing

     

    People who hate chess - I feel sorry for them because they are hated by others

     

    Others - They hate people who hate chess

     

    People who hate chess - Hate people who hate people who hate chess. So they hate the others.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #120

    AndyClifton

    Maplo wrote:
    wbilfc wrote:

    I hate people who hate people who hate chess.

     

    Should there be a whom in there somewhere? I can never work that one out!  :0)

    Your sentence is correct. It should only be "whom" if the people are having something done to them, not if they are the doers, e.g. "I feel sorry for people WHO hate chess and WHOM are therefore themselves hated by others."


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