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I wouldn't play otb chess if you paid me part 2


  • 2 years ago · Quote · #1

    linuxblue1

    The last otb chess game that I played was in a FIDE rated tournament in 2006.

    Three things would have to happen for me to think about playing otb chess again:

    [1.] I would need tournaments on a weekend in the daytime. I can not play chess in the evenings. My mind is never there. The pieces seem to swim around the board. I get tired out. It's no fun at all.

    [2.] I would need support from another chess player who is going to the same chess event.I've never had this. I found chess tournaments totally lonely affairs.

    [3.] I would need arbiters who do not favour a 2300 player over say a 1500 player because the 2300 player has more political clout regardless of the rights/wrongs/facts of any dispute.

    But I am not holding my breath on any of these 3 things being met within my lifetime.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #2

    deadastronauts

    These are excellent points.

    I'm not interested in OTB events either for these reasons and more.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #3

    linuxblue1

    I decided to make a second thread on this because this time I am more constructive. I am saying that IF these 3 points were satisfied I would play otb chess. I regret that I cannot play it.

    For point 2 sometimes I wonder if Laszlo Polgar's project would have produced any success above the average level if there had been only one Polgar sister to teach. That is the worst point for me. [1] and [3] are bad. But the lack of support is an absolute killer. My otb playing strength suffers I would say by at least 500 ELO points for otb chess being such a God-forsaken, l;onely afair.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #4

    Fear_ItseIf

    linuxblue1 wrote:

    [1.] I would need tournaments on a weekend in the daytime. I can not play chess in the evenings. 

    [2.] I would need support from another chess player who is going to the same chess event.I've never had this. I found chess tournaments totally lonely affairs.

    [3.] I would need arbiters who do not favour a 2300 player over say a 1500 player because the 2300 player has more political clout regardless of the rights/wrongs/facts of any dispute.

    1)Deifine where you seperate 'daytime' from evening? surely you dont expect it to be over before 12?

    2)If you go to tournaments maybe youll make friends who play chess then it wont be lonely? This isnt something other people can solve for you, do you want ACF or FIDE to pay someone to hold your hand?

    3)How does 3 affect your chess at all? The chances you will be consistently playing people around 2300 are next to nothing.
     

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #5

    APawnCanDream

    Not sure where your from but here in the States we have plenty of weekend tournaments that run from mid morning into the evening. Needing social interaction seems to be an issue on your end and unrelated to over the board chess itself or its organizers, and the third, at least in the states, seems like an improbability so not sure what that complaint is all about. We have sections in our tournaments so a 1500 would never play a 2300, he would play in Under 1700.

    To say you play chess and not participate in over the board tournament play denies yourself the real chess experience. Having played over the board tournament I don't believe the online experience is anywhere near a substitute for the real chess experience of over the board tournament play. I couldn't imagine not playing in over the board tournaments. Its just missing out on the chess experience. Your really missing out not playing in them in my opinion.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #6

    JamesCoons

    Its easy to make friends in tournaments. You have a common interest. Just talk to people about chess. Go to eat with people between rounds. It really isn't very hard. 

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #7

    linuxblue1

    Not at home. But in the 1990's I used to play some casual games in community centres. I don't play those now; I only play online.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #8

    BorgQueen

    Why do you need support???

    I vastly prefer OTB chess than online.  Given a choice I would always choose OTB.

    My reasons:

    • 3d!  There is no substitute for a real board, moving real pieces around and capturing opponent pieces yourself.
    • Very very few cheaters.  I don't believe anyone has EVER cheated against me OTB.  Unlike online.
    • Meet real people, make friends (there's your 'support'?).
    • Your opponent can forget to press the clock.
    • Touch move.
    • Atmosphere.  
    • No "connection" issues.
    • No disconnectors / game abandoners.
    • No vacation interruptions.
    • Almost no impoliteness - no cowards hiding behind the screen hurling abuse at you.
    • No computer based 'policy' ready to abandon your game if you take too long on one move.
    • There's probably more... but I think I have presented some good positives for OTB!

    We have good arbitors, they don't favour anyone, only the rules. 

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #9

    linuxblue1

    Almost no impoliteness - no cowards hiding behind the screen hurling abuse at you.

    ********

    I agree with that at the time. But afterwards I have had otb players saying online that my "chess is a load of crap". Even worse these people are professional chess coaches [?] in Australia.

    I don't care what rating or reputation a chess coach has. If there is that sort of rudeness and lack of constructive respect then I would rather be coached by a vodka-breathed Russian on a park bench.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #10

    Estragon

    It's good to have a tournament buddy to share expenses and take meals with, especially if you don't know many of the other players in the event.  But there isn't a whole lot of free time in a weekend tournament, and no guarantee two players will have their free time overlap much.

    There are some one-day tournaments with faster time limits that finish early in the evening, but the nature of weekend events means you have to have evening rounds on at least one night, and sometimes on Friday evening as well (although that's a Friday nite/Saturday morning option in some).  That's just the way it is and has always been.  If you can't adjust, say by getting more rest the week before, then maybe OTB really isn't for you.

    I've never seen an arbiter favor a 2300 over a lower player because of his rating.  I've seen Bill Goichberg argue with GMs over his rulings favoring unknowns.  Some local arbiters may lean over backwards for their own local players, but that's rare in my experience.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #11

    linuxblue1

    I've never seen favouritism otb. Mainly I base my cynicism from correspondence chess experiences in which an arbiter did blatantly favour the other player; I was not allowed to obtain the scoresheet in spite of the dispute being about the content of it. Specifically, I was accused of marking the envelopes with a false date to give myself more time. Pathetic? Absolutely. But I took the accusation seriously and tried to respond with the facts [?] of the matter. But without the scoresheets and the dates how the heck could I respond with facts? I walked out of the tournament. I am probably banned from correspondence chess worldwide for life for this. But heck, stuff them. What do I care?

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #12

    BorgQueen

    linuxblue1 wrote:

    ... I have had otb players saying online that my "chess is a load of crap"...

    That would be online chess then, not OTB.  If it were OTB, you could punch them in the nose... so they don't do it.  That behaviour generally only happens online.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #13

    BorgQueen

    linuxblue1 wrote:

    I've never seen favouritism otb. Mainly I base my cynicism from correspondence chess experiences in which an arbiter did blatantly favour the other player; I was not allowed to obtain the scoresheet in spite of the dispute being about the content of it. Specifically, I was accused of marking the envelopes with a false date to give myself more time. Pathetic? Absolutely. But I took the accusation seriously and tried to respond with the facts [?] of the matter. But without the scoresheets and the dates how the heck could I respond with facts? I walked out of the tournament. I am probably banned from correspondence chess worldwide for life for this. But heck, stuff them. What do I care?

     

    I'm confused... or you might be.  You walked out on a correpsondence tournament??  Interesting since you don't attend them.

    Correspondence is also not OTB, so you seem to be arguing for OTB not for online/correspondence chess... And you do the same thing with your opening statement... 

    "I've never seen favouitism OTB."  

    Neither have I, good isn't it?!

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #14

    CalamityChristie

    "punch them in the kisser"

    that was e8nf9's old warcry

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #15

    Estragon

    BorgQueen wrote:
    linuxblue1 wrote:

    I've never seen favouritism otb. Mainly I base my cynicism from correspondence chess experiences in which an arbiter did blatantly favour the other player; I was not allowed to obtain the scoresheet in spite of the dispute being about the content of it. Specifically, I was accused of marking the envelopes with a false date to give myself more time. Pathetic? Absolutely. But I took the accusation seriously and tried to respond with the facts [?] of the matter. But without the scoresheets and the dates how the heck could I respond with facts? I walked out of the tournament. I am probably banned from correspondence chess worldwide for life for this. But heck, stuff them. What do I care?

     

    I'm confused... or you might be.  You walked out on a correpsondence tournament??  Interesting since you don't attend them.

    Correspondence is also not OTB, so you seem to be arguing for OTB not for online/correspondence chess... And you do the same thing with your opening statement... 

    "I've never seen favouitism OTB."  

    Neither have I, good isn't it?!

    I took his complaint to be in a correspondence tournament where his opponent charged him with fudging reflection time (postal transmission time didn't count, but it was an honor system on that) and he had a dispute on the case the arbiter didn't satisfy. 

    In my experience, the most that would happen is a warning, because it is impossible to prove postal travel time.  It was always a huge loophole, so the only time forfeits in correspondence would be those who "silently withdrew" by just not responding anymore.  So unless the arbiter actually imposed some penalty, I didn't see his complaint as justified (they are never going to send you such details, it's still a freaking game, not a Supreme Court brief).

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #16

    linuxblue1

    Yeah. The reality was that yes, sometimes the date on the envelope didn't always match the one on the scoresheet. True. BUT IN spite of my best efforts sometimes I would put it in the envelope and forget to go to the post office. get distracted etc. So it would look as though I had cheated myself an extra day. But what was also true was that on just as many time I cheated myself OUT OF an extra day because I put a date onto the envelope or the sheet before I posted it.

    So my opponent without telling me told the arbiter that I was fudging days. Then I get a letter saying "please explain accusations...". At that stage I don't have the scoresheet - the arbiter has got it or the opponent has. I would need to have it to point out all of the above. Heck, for a dispute that is this trivial should i have photocopied every envelope lol?

    Had I been given the scoresheet I would have explained as above and I would have made some effort to get my envelope/write move routine undistracted by life, the universe and everything.

    But as it was I couldn't be bothered anymore. I wanted to play on in the tournament. I was about to get a  draw with a 2200 FIDE player in another game. I add that the position was dead even in our dispute game. It was clear to me that there was favouritism - I was not being given the opportunity to defend and explain. To me the absence of a scoresheet was like an otb time scramble where the arbiter takes the sheets of both players and then says to you "why did you fudge this move?" without allowing you to see either sheet. You would walk out then.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #17

    Irontiger

    Estragon wrote:

    I took his complaint to be in a correspondence tournament where his opponent charged him with fudging reflection time (postal transmission time didn't count, but it was an honor system on that) and he had a dispute on the case the arbiter didn't satisfy. 

    Today, I learnt they are still correspondance chess played by post mails.

    Why not send the moves via email, especially in countries where post mail is not-so-reliable (I heard rumors it's the case in the US, but don't have any real idea) then the transmission time is almost zero and they are completely tracable if any dispute arises ?

    (of course, there is the case where people don't have free internet access, but it isn't really an issue for at least 90% of correspondance chess players, that have time for this kind of hobby, live in advanced countries, etc.).

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #18

    linuxblue1

    For a piece of absolute amusement the name of the opponent in that disputed postal game was Peter Caissa. Yes. He had changed his surname to Caissa by deed poll. That is not a joke. He seriously did.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #19

    linuxblue1

    This was in the mid 1990's when email CC had not taken off Laughing

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #20

    pawnzischeme

    I enjoy OTB the most, but the OP #1 is my complaint. It's not that  I can't physically or mentally handle it, but I don't want to spend 2-3 days, all day and into the late evening. playing chess; especially in a place where there are other things to do, e.g., Vegas, Chicago, Fla., etc.


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