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If Capablanca played Carlsen for the world champion match, who would win?


  • 4 days ago · Quote · #521

    najdorf96

    Indeed. Its easy to overlook Capa's natural talent. Though Im an Carlsen fan I have said many timed Capa would beat him in a match. I am of the absolute opinion as Magnus is not conventional in assessing positions that Jose could actually, through experience alone, outplay him.

  • 4 days ago · Quote · #522

    darek123

    I hate carleson

  • 4 days ago · Quote · #523

    fabelhaft

    "Though Im an Carlsen fan I have said many timed Capa would beat him in a match. I am of the absolute opinion as Magnus is not conventional in assessing positions that Jose could actually, through experience alone, outplay him"

    Kasparov was asked if the top players today are better than him and Karpov, and he said that every generation is better than the previous one, that's just how it is. Capablanca lost to Alekhine in the 1920s, and could just not compete with the best players nine decades later, chess has changed much too much the last century.

  • 33 hours ago · Quote · #524

    Polar_Bear

    Chess hasn't changed, the rules are still the same. Of course young star Kasparov beat 60-years old Smyslov, but it doesn't imply his generation understood chess overall better than Smyslov's. Karpov would probably lose a match vs Carlsen today, but Karpov's level in 80's is unsurpassed by today's top players. The same Capablanca, his level in years 1918-22 is way above today's top.

  • 31 hours ago · Quote · #525

    SmyslovFan

    Tal-Capablanca would have been a fun match. If Tal was healthy, I'd prefer Tal. His ability to create irrational positions and find wins confounded Botvinnik in 1960. He showed repeatedly that his endgame technique was truly world class. 

    I believe that Tal would defeat Capa in a match, and more decisively than Alekhine did. As Kasparov pointed out, Capa did not respond well to Alekhine's fighting spirit and dynamism. Capa's legendary technique abandoned him in that match. It wasn't because Capa was suddenly somehow weaker, it was because technique really gets tested when a player is tired. And Alekhine tired out Capa. 

    As great as Tal was, Fischer was better. As great as Fischer was, Kasparov was better. As great as Kasparov was, and is, Carlsen is already better.

  • 31 hours ago · Quote · #526

    GreedyPawnEater

    SmyslovFan wrote:

    Tal-Capablanca would have been a fun match. If Tal was healthy, I'd prefer Tal. His ability to create irrational positions and find wins confounded Botvinnik in 1960. He showed repeatedly that his endgame technique was truly world class. 

    I believe that Tal would defeat Capa in a match, and more decisively than Alekhine did. As Kasparov pointed out, Capa did not respond well to Alekhine's fighting spirit and dynamism. Capa's legendary technique abandoned him in that match. It wasn't because Capa was suddenly somehow weaker, it was because technique really gets tested when a player is tired. And Alekhine tired out Capa. 

    As great as Tal was, Fischer was better. As great as Fischer was, Kasparov was better. As great as Kasparov was, and is, Carlsen is already better.

    Utter nonsense. Carlsen is a patzer compared to the great communist masters Karpov and Kasparov.

  • 31 hours ago · Quote · #527

    GreedyPawnEater

    Polar_Bear wrote:

    Chess hasn't changed, the rules are still the same. Of course young star Kasparov beat 60-years old Smyslov, but it doesn't imply his generation understood chess overall better than Smyslov's. Karpov would probably lose a match vs Carlsen today, but Karpov's level in 80's is unsurpassed by today's top players. The same Capablanca, his level in years 1918-22 is way above today's top.

    Yes, nobody has ever achieved higher level than the Soviet Communist masters Smyslov, Karpov and Kasparov.

  • 27 hours ago · Quote · #528

    tmodel66

    I say Carlsen because Capablanca is dead.

  • 25 hours ago · Quote · #529

    yureesystem

    Botvinnik praise Capablanca:Capablanca‘s style also heavily influenced the styles of later World Champions Botvinnik, Robert James Fischer and Anatoly Karpov. Botvinnik observed that Alekhine had received much schooling from Capablanca in positional play, before their fight for the world title made them bitter enemies. ( I would include Carlsen too.)   


    Here is Keres trying to beat Capablanca but fail; Capablanca was 51 years old to Keres 23 years, a battle of genius chess and generation gap. 

    Capablanca makes chess look easy; he takes second place in Margate 1939, not bad for a 51 years genius.  



    TOURNAMENT STANDINGS
    Margate Tournament 

    Paul Keres 7.5/9 (+6 -0 =3) [view games]
    Jose Raul Capablanca 6.5/9 (+4 -0 =5) [view games]
    Salomon Flohr 6.5/9 (+5 -1 =3) [view games]
    George Alan Thomas 5/9 (+3 -2 =4) [view games]
    Philip Stuart Milner-Barry 4.5/9 (+1 -1 =7) [view games]
    Miguel Najdorf 4/9 (+3 -4 =2) [view games]
    Harry Golombek 3.5/9 (+2 -4 =3) [view games]
    Edward G Sergeant 3/9 (+1 -4 =4) [view games]
    Vera Menchik 2.5/9 (+0 -4 =5) [view games]
    George Shorrock Ashcombe Wheatcroft 2/9 (+1 -6 =2) [view games]
  • 25 hours ago · Quote · #530

    GreedyPawnEater

    They were amateurs back then. Capablanca couldn't even beat George Thomas who was a badminton player.

  • 25 hours ago · Quote · #531

    yureesystem

    Here Capablanca destroy a young pup and he is licking his wounds.  Capablanca makes winning so easy even at 51 years old.

     

        

     

       visayanbraindoctor<Karpova: an extraordinary beautiful game!> Wow, I agree! Capablanca was acting like the chess machine he used to be in his younger days, before his troubles with HPN. He accurately, efficiently, and beautifully demolished Mikenas' inaccurate play.

    Mikenas was a strong GM-strength Baltic player (later awarded the FIDE GM title post WW2), who has beaten several World Champions and near-World Champions, and was much respected in the Soviet school of chess. Yet Capablanca in this demolition makes him look almost like a newbie.                 

  • 24 hours ago · Quote · #532

    SmyslovFan

    Just a reminder: 51 years old is NOT ancient. Most chess players reach their prime around age 30 and maintain their skill with minimal decline until nearly 60.

  • 24 hours ago · Quote · #533

    yureesystem

    Here is world champion candidate and Capablanca makes him look a like fool; when Capa is in trouble he can so easily.  

     

     

     

     

    Perhaps Najdorf can answer this. This is what he wrote in 1969 about this game:

    "Vain and proud as I was, I thought I had 'made it' as a chessplayer because I had a chance to do battle with an acknowledged chess genius. Under the sway of my emotions, I came out with my prepared opening; Capablanca meanwhile was totally relaxed. Two very pretty women were following his actions as if mesmerized. Without ever taking his eyes off them for long, he built up a commanding initiative. My position went steadily downhill, and the most galling thing for me was the sense of being disdained and made a fool of. In my desperation I tried reminding myself: 'Being beaten by Capablanca isn't a calamity. It's an honor just to have sat opposite him at a chessboard.' Yet I couldn't shake off the feeling of humiliation. 'To hell with chess,' I thought. 'I'm going to devote myself to other things. I'm going to invent a <new> game.' With my head spinning, I set a trap, and Capablanca, true to his usual practice, made his reply without thinking for very long. Luckily for me it was an oversight, and he was soon forced to give up some material. Immediately he offered a draw. I refused."

    When Najdorf declined the Cuban's offer with only one minute left on his clock for 17 moves, the word spread like wildfire among the spectators: "That man's mad or a genius!" ("Nowadays we know that he's both!"- Max Euwe )

     

    As a result of some further errors the game ended in a draw after all. At the time, Najdorf thought: "It's a triumph to draw with Capablanca of all players, but I'm damned if I don't owe it to those two women who've been devouring him with their eyes."

  • 23 hours ago · Quote · #534

    jovicam1

    For my opinion Carlson can't play Capa in endings
  • 22 hours ago · Quote · #535

    JamieDelarosa

    The Cuban

  • 22 hours ago · Quote · #536

    jovicam1

    Just compare Carlsen endings and Capas endings and you'll find answer...

  • 58 minutes ago · Quote · #537

    yureesystem

    Capablanca and Carlsen is basically the same; Capablanca has better nerves than Carlsen and will give Capablanca  better chances to win a match.

  • 8 minutes ago · Quote · #538

    Elubas

    Well, no, I would say Carlsen has better nerves than Capablanca, and everyone. He's like a Karpov/Capablanca but has the supercharged will to win of a Fischer. That's what makes him so exceptional.

  • 4 minutes ago · Quote · #539

    Elubas

    SmyslovFan wrote:

    Just a reminder: 51 years old is NOT ancient. Most chess players reach their prime around age 30 and maintain their skill with minimal decline until nearly 60.

    I think minimal is probably stretching it... chess is a demanding game. I basically agree with this point in that it's probably vastly overestimated how much age affects you, people can still be very sharp in their 50s, but I think it will still have a definite effect.

  • a few minutes ago · Quote · #540

    Arawn_of_Annuvin

    yureesystem wrote:

    Capablanca and Carlsen is basically the same; Capablanca has better nerves than Carlsen and will give Capablanca  better chances to win a match.

    Are you and GreedyPawnEater the same person? What's with making statements like this without providing anything to back up your claim? Capablanca has better nerves than Carlsen? How do you know? How do you know what Carlsen's nerves are?


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