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Improving the chess of an 8 year old kid


  • 3 years ago · Quote · #1

    dee-u

    I've got an 8 year old son who knows how to play chess. Well, he can beat his mother who is also a 'beginner' but I want him to improve his chess further so he can compete in their school. Ideally, what sort of things should I teach him in order? I am teaching him to develop all of his pieces, control the center and attack the King. What I notice is that he is weak in spotting 'free' (en-prise) pieces which I deliberately do when we play just to train him in that part.

    Thanks in advance for any suggestions!

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #2

    ROOKe281

    well and let me say that this is just my opinion but its working for me on my nephew and cousin who are both 8. I play both of them at the same time and keep a lot of pressure on them but make them explain EVERY move and why they are doing it. If they cant explain they have to do another move that simple. Also motivate them with something, whether its a new video game shoes or whatever they like! I have a 100 dollar reward for whoever captures my King. I even broke it down like this a 50 dollar bill then 20 singles, 20 is 5's and a 10 to them its the lottery and they think they rich but to me its a motivational tool for them. Now im not encouraging gambling but it makes them think even harder. Also pair him with someone else his age thats better than him. this works if he competive. the results are proven. much as I hate to say it I look forward to losing these 200 bucks cause I know it wont be soon but it will be well worth it with what they have learned! Sorry if i dint tell you the traditional methods like tatics or study the end game but I do whats proven and getting results from it he's 8 he has plenty of time to be bored to death with all the "book methods" of winning just let him have fun for now

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #3

    ROOKe281

    good luck with it let me know how it works for you!

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #4

    AndyClifton

    (I still say you're encouraging gambling...)

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #5

    cabrego

    I've been teaching my 7year old for about 3-4 months and he has picked up the game very well.  Obviously the first step is to make sure they really understand how the pieces move.  Knights can be really tricky for them to learn.  After that it is good to have them explain their moves as mentioned before, it really gives you insight into how much they understand and helps you identify weaknesses.  It would be a good idea to get him involved in a chess club at school too.

     

    good .luck

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #6

    BobbyRaulMorphy

    I really like the Chess School series of puzzle books.  They're a russian training program designed for kids, all puzzles, no text, and they have cool kids' pictures on the covers.  The series begins with 1-2 move mates and swindles and gradually gets harder, covering all phases of the game.  The first book alone would take him to D or C class.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #7

    transpo

    Keep it simple.  The beginning position in chess is the most complicated problem.  Work with them in the endgame.  First teach them the basic checkmates (K+Q v R, K+R v K, K +2B v K, and K+B+N v K).  All of these basic checkmates involve one concept of "corraling the enemy King" with your King and piece(s) in order to deliver checkmate in the corner of the board.  It is not only fun for them because they are getting to win by checkmating which is the object of the game, but more important, they are learning the power of the pieces hands on.

    After that teach them K+p v K. Once they have mastered how to advance the pawn to the 8th rank and promote it, let's say they chose to promote it to a Rook, have them show you the basic checkmate K+R v K.  The most important concept that the child will gain from this is the understanding of converting one winning advantage into a won game advantage.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #8

    cofail

    transpo wrote:

    Keep it simple.  The beginning position in chess is the most complicated problem.  Work with them in the endgame.  First teach them the basic checkmates (K+Q v R, K+R v K, K +2B v K, and K+B+N v K).  All of these basic checkmates involve one concept of "corraling the enemy King" with your King and piece(s) in order to deliver checkmate in the corner of the board.  It is not only fun for them because they are getting to win by checkmating which is the object of the game, but more important, they are learning the power of the pieces hands on.

    After that teach them K+p v K. Once they have mastered how to advance the pawn to the 8th rank and promote it, let's say they chose to promote it to a Rook, have them show you the basic checkmate K+R v K.  The most important concept that the child will gain from this is the understanding of converting one winning advantage into a won game advantage.


    K+P V K is so much more useful than mating with two bishops and a bishop and knight.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #9

    ROOKe281

    AndyClifton wrote:

    (I still say you're encouraging gambling...)


     O well it works for me. and the same way u just stated ur opinion i was stating mine so fk off!

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #10

    BobbyRaulMorphy

    It's positive reinforcement which is a good way to teach kids.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #11

    jaydeeuk1

    Gambling is an important skill to learn - when the probability is on your side or not. In this case, I'd say that given enough time, the kid will beat you.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #12

    jetfighter13

    dude teach them card counting, oh wait wrong game

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #13

    digimon1

    Firstly Mr dee-u I would like to say that it looks like you are doing just fine in helping him improve. I think telling your child to develop his pieces, control the center and attack the king is both good, and the right amount of, advice. However, here is what I think could (I hope it does) also help :) :

    I think the most important thing is that he has FUN :D whilst learning. I think for an eight year old, the funnest chess things he can do are to play blitz (online is good), solve some puzzles, play against people his own age,and win against his mother :)

    At that level, normally the person who wins is the person who is willing to think the most, and if he get's to enjoy chess thinking then that will surely help! And if you are hoping for him to keep playing the game then it would be nice if his memories of learning it are as fond as possible :).

    Although there are many blitz doubters out there, it was the main thing that helped my little brother to improve when he was around that age, and still helps him to improve! You can probably tell from my username that this wasn't that long ago hehe.It should help to keep him sharp and learn from his mistakes ( the best bit about blitz is that you can play 5 games in the time it takes to play one, so more mistakes to learn from).

    In contrast to my blitz suggestion, I think another important thing is to explain to him that when he is playing competitively he should take his time. If he sees a good move, he should try and think of a better one! (to steal a quote ;) )

    I think the thought of reading a chess book might be a bit daunting for an 8 year old- but you never know! In anycase, the best of luck to your son! :D

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #14

    blowerd

    Set him an example like this.  For example use the knight to get to the pawn square in as few moves as possible.  (I've only got the kings on here, because when you set moves on chess.com forums the two kings are required.) 

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #15

    jetfighter13

    Either that or make them explane the moves, any explanation better than because so and so played it ( you would count  in this case) should be accepted, also if they add a reason why so and so played it, it should be accepted.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #16

    waffllemaster

    The most general advice... needs to play games to improve, so (as many posts hit on) I'd focus on how to make it fun / on motivation.  If it's not too rough on 'em, try playing over a full length GM game now and then.  All about building patterns, the more they see the better.

    As for hanging pieces, some exercise to get them to pay attention to the last move... even if it's you literally asking them "was my last move a mistake?"  This is where it's good for beginners to play peers because asking themselves that after each move pays off and gives positive reinforcement when the snag free pieces.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #17

    jetfighter13

    show them morphy tal and Fischer games, but keep the first two for if they win, because those can lead to them always sacing material.  Also Fischer Games will show them the subtle parts of the games.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #18

    jaydeeuk1

    And if none of that works, beat him until he stops blundering.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #19

    dee-u

    Thanks a lot guys, your advices are very much appreciated! I'm now thinking of ways to make it fun for him to learn more. As of now, I am trying to teach him how to win if he has a material advantage although he somehow gets frustrated at times. I'll keep trying and I am hoping to see him get better.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #20

    Glazyeyes

    Try to leave and endgame book say Irving chernevs "Chess board Magic" or Capablancas chess endings near your chess set or anywhere your son could notice it. Just leave it there for him to explore. Motivation will come when he starts reading by himself. And soon he will understand that when the game starts it has an end.As soon as he gets the passion for it youll be surprised yourself. Good luck!


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