Upgrade to Chess.com Premium!

In your opinion, when..


  • 3 years ago · Quote · #1

    Crosspinner

    In our Sunday paper is Shelby Lyman on Chess in which there is always a problem for the beginner.  My opinion of a beginner must not be the same as his, because some of those problems seem difficult for what I consider to be a beginner.  In your opinion, when does a beginner graduate from being a beginner?

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #2

    heinzie

    White will always be the beginner

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #3

    Crosspinner

    DC-poc wrote:

    How do you define a beginner?

    What do they graduate to?


    That's not fair answering my question with a question, but I always thought of a beginner as someone who has just learned the laws, moves of the chessmen and still struggling with what to do next, such as, push a pawn or what? But it seems liie a fine line as to when a person is not any longer a beginner. 

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #4

    Crosspinner

    heinzie wrote:

    White will always be the beginner


    I like your humor.    

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #5

    heinzie

    There's a difference between being a beginner and simply being quite bad at chess. There's also a difference between the average chess player and someone who calls his playing strength "average"

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #6

    heinzie

    And a difference between considering youself a strong player and being a strong player

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #7

    Crosspinner

    heinzie wrote:

    There's a difference between being a beginner and simply being quite bad at chess. There's also a difference between the average chess player and someone who calls his playing strength "average"


    I agree with what you wrote, but that does not answer my question. Yes, one may not be a beginner, but a very weak player, but somewhere there must be a point where he/she is not considered a beginner.  Such as, learning to drive.  We usually think once a person graduates from a driving permit by passing the final driving test and receiving a driver's license he is considered a driver. Not a stockcar race driver, but a driver no less.  

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #8

    Crosspinner

    heinzie wrote:

    And a difference between considering youself a strong player and being a strong player


    Yes, isn't it true. I remember a man that joined a small chess group I was in once.  He came in telling how he was once in a chess tourament. As it turned out he was in a neighborhood type tournament. He didn't last long in the group.  

    Then there was a man I met in a library as I sat a chessboard waiting for anyone that would play. He asked if I was waiting on anyone, and I said no and asked him if he played.  He only answered, "Some."  He beat me all four games.  I held my own until the endgames.  He was much better in the endgames.  His some proved to be devastrating to me. 

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #9

    heinzie

    Crosspinner wrote:
    heinzie wrote:

    There's a difference between being a beginner and simply being quite bad at chess. There's also a difference between the average chess player and someone who calls his playing strength "average"


    I agree with what you wrote, but that does not answer my question. Yes, one may not be a beginner, but a very weak player, but somewhere there must be a point where he/she is not considered a beginner.  Such as, learning to drive.  We usually think once a person graduates from a driving permit by passing the final driving test and receiving a driver's license he is considered a driver. Not a stockcar race driver, but a driver no less.  


    Yes, this idea of a driver's license vs. a chess "license" has been keeping me awake as well. I don't know yet how to compare the two.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #10

    DA_Jones

    I'd say your a beginner until you win at least three times against an opponent of 1800 or better by executinging and caring out a plan and not by luck.

    Which I haven't managed to do even once yet.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #11

    Crosspinner

    DA_Jones wrote:

    I'd say your a beginner until you win at least three times against an opponent of 1800 or better by executinging and caring out a plan and not by luck.

    Which I haven't managed to do even once yet.


    Wow, that is very stringent. Isn't that sort of saying one isn't a driver until he/she has driven through New York City during the rush-hour?  If that be the case, many chess players are hopelessly beginners.

    I know, I asked for your opinion, and that is your opinion. I guess I passed, because I once beat a 2000 by very determined planning and execution. I could beat him about 1 out of nine times.  I have no rating. 

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #12

    heinzie

    If drivers are undecided like chess players, they'd cause an accident at every second junction

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #13

    Crosspinner

    heinzie wrote:

    If drivers are undecided like chess players, they'd cause an accident at every second junction


    Traffic blunders! 

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #14

    Steinar

    I'd say you're a beginner until you know some basic principles of each phase of the game, and you're familiar with and utilize in play common tactical motives.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #15

    KyleJRM

    Crosspinner wrote:
    heinzie wrote:

    If drivers are undecided like chess players, they'd cause an accident at every second junction


    Traffic blunders! 


    I had one this weekend! Ended up in a ditch.

    1. Car to J9??

    My car is supposed to move like a rook and it ended up more like a knight.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #16

    Crosspinner

    Steinar wrote:

    I'd say you're a beginner until you know some basic principles of each phase of the game, and you're familiar with and utilize in play common tactical motives.


    Now we are getting somewhere.  Yes, one can know these things and not ever become a strong player, yet is beyond the beings a beginner. Back to relating this to driving. One can know how to maneuver a curve, drive on ice, parallel park, etc., yet not be able to drive a truck on the ice-highway in Alaska.

    Defining a when a beginner creases being a beginner in many cases is as difficult as defining when one enters the middle game.  No two games are ever exactly alike. 

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #17

    Crosspinner

    KyleJRM wrote:
    Crosspinner wrote:
    heinzie wrote:

    If drivers are undecided like chess players, they'd cause an accident at every second junction


    Traffic blunders! 


    I had one this weekend! Ended up in a ditch.

    1. Car to J9??

    My car is supposed to move like a rook and it ended up more like a knight.


    I can relate to that!  

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #18

    heinzie

    KyleJRM wrote:
    Crosspinner wrote:
    heinzie wrote:

    If drivers are undecided like chess players, they'd cause an accident at every second junction


    Traffic blunders! 


    I had one this weekend! Ended up in a ditch.

    1. Car to J9??

    My car is supposed to move like a rook and it ended up more like a knight.


    Yes, something like that, dropping pieces left and right. Rd4?? Nxd4 which leaves some indentation to the side of the rook

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #19

    heinzie

    DC-poc wrote:
    Godspawn wrote:

    Once you become a C class player, i think its safe to say youre no longer a beginner.


    What's a class C player?


    1400-1600

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #20

    Crosspinner

    heinzie wrote:
    DC-poc wrote:
    Godspawn wrote:

    Once you become a C class player, i think its safe to say youre no longer a beginner.


    What's a class C player?


    1400-1600


    This would explain why someone writes that being a beginner help is needed, yet when checking the person's rating it is in this range. To me this is not at beginner. Not a strong player, yes, but not a beginner.  I suppose the higher one's rating is the beginner level raises with his/her rating of a beginner. I wonder, do GMs look at C-players as beginners?


Back to Top

Post your reply: