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Is it illegal?


  • 10 months ago · Quote · #1

    BoobsGalore

    I was at a tournament last week.

    My opponent pushed his pawn 2 squares forward and then took it back right when he saw me about to take it with my Bishop.

    He didn't press the clock yet though and since I was low in time, I was rushing to make my move as quick after he made it.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #2

    Suvel2000

    it is illegal, next time pause the clock and get a td (tournament director)

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #3

    pelly13

    In your case it depends . Did he still have to pawn in his hand when he saw that you was about to take it ?

    A move is said to be concluded when a player finishes a legal move by taking his hand off the piece played . If he still holds the piece in his hand , the move is not yet concluded , but now he must play (any legal ) move with that piece. He's not allowed to play with any other piece.

    So , if he played a different piece and pressed the clock , you can point it out to him or call the director and claim extra time.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #4

    BoobsGalore

    His hand was off the pawn for half a second. 

    Right when I was about to take it, he quickly grabbed it back and made another move. 

    But he didn't press his clock yet though.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #5

    BoobsGalore

    I see pelly13. 

    Luckily, I didn't really care much. It was my first tournament and it had no effect on my rating. No prizes or fee anyway. 

    But I was just curious on the rules so it wouldn't happen next time.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #6

    pelly13

    BoobsGalore schreef:

    His hand was off the pawn for half a second. 

    Right when I was about to take it, he quickly grabbed it back and made another move. 

    But he didn't press his clock yet though.

    Well you say his hand was off the pawn and the move he played was legal. It's now a concluded move : his pawn is considered to be played.

    You say he did another move and that is illegal . I would now start to attrackt the attention of the arbiter , but since he didn't press his clock yet , I would wait for my opponent to press the clock and only then lay it before the judge.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #7

    yeres30

    In tournament play it is TOUCH MOVE not Touch Clock.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #8

    Estragon

    It doesn't matter if he took his hand off the pawn or not.  Once he touched it, he MUST move it if there is a legal move he can make with it.  NO EXCEPTIONS in tournament play. 

    The only problem is the type of player who tries to take back a move usually has no problem LYING about it.  So a witness would help a lot, perhaps a player at an adjoining board or a spectator saw it happen.  Stop the clock and summon the arbiter first, though.  There is no point in trying to find witnesses first, wait until the arbiter comes and see if the guy denies touching the piece.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #9

    Roarmulus

    I wouldn't call this uncommon at a tournament. But under tournament rules, if he takes his hand off the piece, he can take it right back if his clock is still ticking provided he must move that piece for that turn. If he puts it back and moves another piece, he has made an illegal move and you should holler for an adjudicator to remove the fool. But if he moves the pawn forward twice and sees you prepare your bishop to take, provided his clock is going he has every right to make it a single move forward.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #10

    Remellion

    ^ No he doesn't. Touch move applies when the piece is touched. But once the piece is released, no more takebacks, no playing a different move with that piece.

    See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judit_Polg%C3%A1r#Kasparov_touch-move_controversy

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #11

    yeres30

    In Linares 1994, Kasparov himself took back a move in his game against Judit Polgar. The position after 36.Nd2 below is the scene of chess Kasparov's crime.
                                                        Black to move

    In the above position, Kasparov played 36...Nc5, except that he realized that after 36....Nc5 Judit would have won the exchange with 37.Bc6. Kasparov took back his move to d2 and later played 36...Nf8

    Although there was no witness Spanish TV filmed the scene " Kasparov dropped the Knight on c5, lifted hand a bit, then saw he was losing a Rook, took the Knight back to d7 and few seconds later played Nf8. Judit was stunned, looked around for the arbiter but didn’t complain at all."

    Kasparov won that game.  Except that even Chess.Games labelled that game as "J'adoube! game of the day Dec 30-05"

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #12

    BoobsGalore

    So funny. Right after I posted my question, I came across this chess book, read through all 300 pages and came across the same Kasparov vs Polgar match where Kasparov apparently cheated slightly.

    It was my first tournament so all I cared about was gaining experience, mostly psychologically handling the pressure, adrenaline, and other factors. Doesn't matter if I won or loss. I'm glad I learned about the touch move rule so next time, it won't happen to me again in a real tournament.

    Lesson: Don't be too nice to the person beforehand. Otherwise, he might take advantage of your kindness which was what the guy did lol.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #13

    qablo

    Your opponent should, at the very least, move the pawn. By the rules, he should leave the pawn where he put it in the first place. No discusion whatsoever.

    What I have to tell you is that you can´t move your pieces until your opponent finish the move, this means, after he presses the clock. If he doesn´t press the clock, is not "legally" your turn yet. 

    What you can do is take a bishop and, without droping it at all, put it from c1 to d2 and then, you think is not good, you can put it back c1, drop it, think again, and move it finally to e3 for instance. This is perfectly OK. Of course, once you touch the bishop in the first place, you must move it.

    As a little advise, use first your brain and then your hand always, it´s easier. Also pick up one routine: think, move, press the clock and note the move, in this order, and you´ll be fine. Do you know how to ask for a draw correctly? 

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #14

    Tapani

    Some (usually blitz) tournaments has the additional rule that the clock finalizes the move, not releasing the piece.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #15

    qablo

    Tapani escribió:

    Some (usually blitz) tournaments has the additional rule that the clock finalizes the move, not releasing the piece.

    I think this is for all games really, the clock finalizes the move always. Not in blitz, not in slow time controls you can move one piece, drop it off, and then think about take it back. All is left is press the clock, no other choice, or resign :D


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