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Is This Unsportsmanlike?


  • 2 years ago · Quote · #101

    CardinaldeAjedrez

    I ain't upset! lol!

    I am just asking you if you have read the original thread! (and the link)

    And then answer the question objectively, is it or is it not unsportsmanlike!

    Easy does it! Yes, life's too short!Smile

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #102

    wbilfc

    Not all of it, it's a long thread. To summarise, I don't think it's unsportsmanlike not to resign, but yes it is to simply drag the time out. Clearly abandoning a game and making your opponent wait for the time to run out is very frustrating and definitely unsportsmanlike.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #103

    Jedoch

    wbilfc wrote:

    Not all of it, it's a long thread. To summarise, I don't think it's unsportsmanlike not to resign, but yes it is to simply drag the time out. Clearly abandoning a game and making your opponent wait for the time to run out is very frustrating and definitely unsportsmanlike.

    This really sums it all up! 

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #104

    Owlmoon

    ClavierCavalier wrote:
    Owlmoon2000 wrote:

    The thing is, if white played g3, he could have tried for the stalemate trick as Qxg3?? is a draw

    What game are you alking about?

     

    The picture on the first post.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #105

    kalaro

    Owlmoon2000 wrote:
    ClavierCavalier wrote:
    Owlmoon2000 wrote:

    The thing is, if white played g3, he could have tried for the stalemate trick as Qxg3?? is a draw

    What game are you alking about?

     

    The picture on the first post.

    Here is the actual game:



  • 2 years ago · Quote · #106

    MagniErick

    Resigning is the best choice in the sample game. Well, if his opponent thinks he can still win, he's a cucko! And if he thinks he can draw either by insufficient material or stalemate, then he should play on and not let the clock run down!

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #107

    MisterBoneman

    What say we have a new perspective, because most seem too happy with their personal uprightness.

    I'm NOT being religious, just using an example.

    You die, you're standing in a very bright room, a voice says to you, "IF YOU HAVE SINNED, GO JUMP IN THAT HOLE OVER THERE" and points to a very dark hole.

    Now, upon coming to an honest answer to that, you may understand better why some people don't WANT to jump in the hole. You can't see the bottom, it's dark and looks uncomfortable. Some will actually run away.

    Or...here's a real life example. First time we were attacked by VC, two of our mechanics crouched down in a semi fetal position and were frozen. They couldn't have gotten up if you offered a million dollars to them.

    What I'm suggesting is that FEAR of the unknown (the game is known, the loss is not) can, will, and does affect different people in different ways. So WHAT the guy walks off. Don't play them anymore. But your standing here now whining about how the "other guy" lost sounds like a flat tone bell made of sand stone.

    In fact, is that not what this is, here? Guys standing around bragging about how bad they scared someone with their oh-so-powerful game?

    Geez... get over it. Move on.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #108

    Roundyracer

    I recently was invited to play my first tourny here.My fellow mates was beating me like a drum.However I kept playing useing the experience as a learning curve.My puter went down and Im bedridden most days battling a illness.So in the end naturally I lost most of my matches also to time.By the way it was a no vacation deal.Once back online I sent a PM to the one who invited me apologizing.I think certain circumstances require certain acts.But to abandom when loseing is not very sportsmanlike leaving one hanging or vacation out.Jusy my take.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #109

    ClavierCavalier

    MisterBoneman wrote:

    What say we have a new perspective, because most seem too happy with their personal uprightness.

    I'm NOT being religious, just using an example.

    You die, you're standing in a very bright room, a voice says to you, "IF YOU HAVE SINNED, GO JUMP IN THAT HOLE OVER THERE" and points to a very dark hole.

    Now, upon coming to an honest answer to that, you may understand better why some people don't WANT to jump in the hole. You can't see the bottom, it's dark and looks uncomfortable. Some will actually run away.

    Or...here's a real life example. First time we were attacked by VC, two of our mechanics crouched down in a semi fetal position and were frozen. They couldn't have gotten up if you offered a million dollars to them.

    What I'm suggesting is that FEAR of the unknown (the game is known, the loss is not) can, will, and does affect different people in different ways. So WHAT the guy walks off. Don't play them anymore. But your standing here now whining about how the "other guy" lost sounds like a flat tone bell made of sand stone.

    In fact, is that not what this is, here? Guys standing around bragging about how bad they scared someone with their oh-so-powerful game?

    Geez... get over it. Move on.

    I'm curious about this flat tone bell made of sand stone.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #110

    ClavierCavalier

    I never understood playing on in this position:

    I have a friend who is very new to chess and wanted me to show them the mate with the queen against the lone king.  They kept stalemating me when I controlled the king.  I know this might happen in the 500 - 800 range, but why do so many players around 1200 - 1400 range still act like they expect a stalemate?

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #111

    fianchetto123

    ClavierCavalier wrote:

    I never understood playing on in this position:

     

    I have a friend who is very new to chess and wanted me to show them the mate with the queen against the lone king.  They kept stalemating me when I controlled the king.  I know this might happen in the 500 - 800 range, but why do so many players around 1200 - 1400 range still act like they expect a stalemate?

    I was stalemated by a 2100 once in KQK. Just once.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #112

    ajedresdetorre

    0ort wrote:

    Last night I had to wait 10 minutes for a game to time out and no, it wasn't the end of the world, but it's still a super lame thing to do to someone basically out of spite because you're too much of a baby to just man up and resign. How anyone could defend this kind of behaviour is beyond me...

    Touche!

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #113

    ClavierCavalier

    fianchetto123 wrote:
    ClavierCavalier wrote:

    I never understood playing on in this position:

     

    I have a friend who is very new to chess and wanted me to show them the mate with the queen against the lone king.  They kept stalemating me when I controlled the king.  I know this might happen in the 500 - 800 range, but why do so many players around 1200 - 1400 range still act like they expect a stalemate?

    I was stalemated by a 2100 once in KQK. Just once.

    Yeah, stalemates can happen, and I even I saw an example of stalemate from a grandmaster game, but it wasn't from the KQK endgame, but it does show that even great players can miss it.  Stalemating in the KQK seems like something a player rated around 1000 should be able to avoid, so this 2100 is quite a shock.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #114

    barumbadass

    Resign or play on, but never abandon! Chess Etiquette 101!

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #115

    corpsporc

    So we're in agreement. Type "holy cow! a tornado is coming!" then abandon the game.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #116

    barumbadass

    Of course! If you want to poo, that's an emergency!

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #117

    barumbadass

    pipinghotsos wrote:

    Resignation is not unsportsmanlike. It is admitting defeat. However, to simply ignore the game is completely the opposite. It forces the winning player to wait to see if they are going to make a move, and it says that you do not even have the grace to say you were defeated.

    In some circumstances it could be excused, like the example of an emergency, but you could still apologise later by messaging the person.

    So, yes, it is unsportsmanlike.

    Here is an example of playing on and hoping to draw via stalemate!

    Nothing wrong with it!!! 



  • 2 years ago · Quote · #118

    ClavierCavalier

    I don't think that's playing in hopes of stalemate.  It seems more like the computer just doesn't resign.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #119

    PoisonedQueen

    CathyLuv wrote:

    I think abandoning a game is bad sportsmanship. 

    Me, too!


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