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Is This Unsportsmanlike?


  • 19 months ago · Quote · #1

    kalaro

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #2

    Andromalius2002

    To abandon a game instead of lose gracefully? Yes, I would consider that unsportsmanlike.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #3

    kalaro

    Did he violated the fair play policy? Of course he did! He has more time than me, and looking at the board, he is clearly losing the game, rather, he has a lost game!

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #4

    kalaro

    Lose gracefully! Yes, it should be innate to all chess players!

    Why? Because we will win some and lose some if we will play chess!

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #5

    fianchetto123

    If he abandoned the game that is the definition of unsportsmanlike-he could have resigned...that wouldnt be unsportsmanlike

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #6

    VanillaKnightPOC

    Never resign!  Play on to the death!

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #7

    barumbadass

    VanillaKnightPOC wrote:

    Never resign!  Play on to the death!

    Yes! Never quit! Let him share your agony of losing , with him the agony of anxiously waiting for the clock to declare him the winner!

    Is that it?

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #8

    barumbadass

    As I see it, he did not resign, BUT neither did he play on to the death, being checkmated! That could have been better!

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #9

    DavidMertz1

    The answer is:  You do not know.  Maybe it was unsportsmanlike.  And maybe some kid got hit by a car outside and he decided calling 911 was more important than finishing your game.

    If it's part of a pattern, the site will detect that and take action without you doing anything.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #10

    barumbadass

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 19 months ago · Quote · #11

    barumbadass

    DavidMertz1 wrote:

    The answer is:  You do not know.  Maybe it was unsportsmanlike.  And maybe some kid got hit by a car outside and he decided calling 911 was more important than finishing your game.

    If it's part of a pattern, the site will detect that and take action without you doing anything.

    Well, if you put it that way, that he has an emergency to attend to, I submit!

    But I highly doubt that! Cool

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #12

    iksarol

    in every book i read i see games where it say black/withe abandon , i have never see any remarks about the GM been unsportsmanlike, i think its part of the game .

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #13

    horribledan

    iksarol wrote:

    in every book i read i see games where it say black/withe abandon , i have never see any remarks about the GM been unsportsmanlike, i think its part of the game .

    Mi amigo, you are claiming that in all the books you have read, you see games that were abandoned, meaning the losing players, GMs at that, instead of resigning, just left their tables and abandoned their games, is that what you are saying?

    Wow! That is quite interesting to know!

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #14

    pipinghotsos

    Resignation is not unsportsmanlike. It is admitting defeat. However, to simply ignore the game is completely the opposite. It forces the winning player to wait to see if they are going to make a move, and it says that you do not even have the grace to say you were defeated.

    In some circumstances it could be excused, like the example of an emergency, but you could still apologise later by messaging the person.

    So, yes, it is unsportsmanlike.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #15

    Curious_Barrel

    I believe in the famous Steinitz vs Von Bardelen game in 1890something Von Bardelen resigned the game by leaving the tournament hall and not returning when he saw the nice checkmate that awaited him. Given that his name is only really known because of this game it would have been wiser to allow the nice mate and lose with dignity to one of the best players of all time as this would have been no disgrace. However I don't know of any other top level games where this happened. I have heard a story, possibly an exaggeration, that Korchnoi and Petrosian resorted to kicking each other under the table during one match. Definitely unsportsmanlike! 

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #16

    ClavierCavalier

    Abandoning the game is supposed to be tracked by chess.com, so it is supposed to be worst for them than resigning.  I wonder how true this really is.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #17

    BlueKnightShade

    Abandoning a lost game is resigning without telling your opponent. Kind of trying to keep it as a secret to your opponent. Unsportsmanlike, yes.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #18

    ClavierCavalier

    DavidMertz1 wrote:

    The answer is:  You do not know.  Maybe it was unsportsmanlike.  And maybe some kid got hit by a car outside and he decided calling 911 was more important than finishing your game.

    If it's part of a pattern, the site will detect that and take action without you doing anything.

    Maybe their house exploded?  It's also possible that aliens abducted their whole neighborhood.

    Other possibilities are that they were on a phone and lost connection, but that's a pretty big coincidence.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #19

    Estragon

    Curious_Barrel wrote:

    I believe in the famous Steinitz vs Von Bardelen game in 1890something Von Bardelen resigned the game by leaving the tournament hall and not returning when he saw the nice checkmate that awaited him. Given that his name is only really known because of this game it would have been wiser to allow the nice mate and lose with dignity to one of the best players of all time as this would have been no disgrace. However I don't know of any other top level games where this happened. I have heard a story, possibly an exaggeration, that Korchnoi and Petrosian resorted to kicking each other under the table during one match. Definitely unsportsmanlike! 

     

    According to contemporary accounts, von Bardeleben left the room because of the audience's habit of applauding and cheering the winners of striking games, which was not the custom on the Continent and was quite disturbing to the other games.  In fact, the organizing committee ruled against any applause or cheering for the remainder of the tournament.

    Steinitz had to wait some 50 minutes before von Bardeleben's time expired, which was a relatively rare thing in those early days of timed tournaments, so he figured out a forced mate in ten and demonstrated this to the spectators once the clock sounded - to excited applause.  He also won the Brilliancy Prize for the game.

     

    Petrosian was noted for such things, especially the kicking.  Korchnoi kicked back.  They were never friendly.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #20

    eddysallin

    your opponent sets up a winning position.He knows u pretty much can see WHATS UP,and since u both KNOW the same thing the best response is--none ?


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