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Letting the clock run out


  • 14 months ago · Quote · #21

    Irinasdaddy

    ponz111 wrote:

    Irina'sdad, I would like to see that position which was completely even, both in material and position.  Maybe your opponent saw something you did not see?

    Your action could affect people playing their game at the time you made your demonstration.  To see someone apparently break the rules and walk out of a game can be disconcerting to those who are still playing and trying to think. 

    Now do you see how your actions can affect the other players?

    Come on, let's see the position where your opponent would not give you the draw? 

    Ponz, this wasn't a 1-day tournament.  This was a one round a week club tournament that took place in a public building with people coming and going.  Yes, there was a separate room only for the tournament, but it's not like I threw the board across the room.  If me leaving affected anybody, that's their issue, not mine.  At the time I had no game going on to my right (that was the game being watched), and to my left was the end of the table.

    Also, you're asking me to find a chess move book from 2008.  If I find it I'll happily post the position for all to see. 

    r_k, I think you probably just need to quit this thread, because you're obviously not reading English properly.  I already said that it was the equivalent of me giving this guy the finger, I also said that he deserved it.  There's nothing warped at all about a sense of honor coming from "If you promise something, deliver on that promise".   

    Ahh, chess, never a dull moment!  Between this and the near fistfight with the guy who cheated while the TD was watching that I posted about a while ago, I guess I get the lion's share of the drama.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #22

    angrybirdstar

    Well, let's get this straight. If it is a match between two people, then I'm pretty sure they're allowed to agree to a draw before the game. But if any tournament, I'm pretty sure that is against the rules.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #23

    Irjene

    cutting a deal with him before the game is tantamount to cheating and maybe he honestly thought he had a winning chance. An even position to you could be an opprtunity to him

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #24

    r_k_ting

    Irinasdaddy, it's you who still can't join the dots. You somehow believe your opponent is honor bound to uphold his agreement to cheat. And you punish his "dishonorable" behaviour by breaking the rules yet again. Your two wrongs don't make a right.

    That's like saying "If you don't rob the bank with me as agreed, I'll kill your pet greyhound and leave his carcass in your bed." That you subscribe to this thieve's honor is a slight on your character, not my comprehension.

    Just in case you missed the point again, your opponent is honor bound not to cheat. He ended up doing the right thing. You committed wrong after wrong and still believe you were the honorable one.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #25

    owltuna

    Two wrongs don't make a right, but three do.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #26

    GeorgeBus

    One of you here needs to re-evaluate your definition of 'honor' :) You shouldn't be talking about such, really, if you went against it in the first place. 

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #27

    Irinasdaddy

    LOL Sven, my last losses were in 1 minute games.  People lose on time in 1 minute games, you know.  Oh, and I feel obliged to point out to you that you were looking for the word 'loser' there, not looser.  Brush up on that grammar and spelling of yours before you start questioning others, bud.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #28

    Irinasdaddy

    r_k_ting wrote:

    Irinasdaddy, it's you who still can't join the dots. You somehow believe your opponent is honor bound to uphold his agreement to cheat. And you punish his "dishonorable" behaviour by breaking the rules yet again. Your two wrongs don't make a right.

    That's like saying "If you don't rob the bank with me as agreed, I'll kill your pet greyhound and leave his carcass in your bed." That you subscribe to this thieve's honor is a slight on your character, not my comprehension.

    Just in case you missed the point again, your opponent is honor bound not to cheat. He ended up doing the right thing. You committed wrong after wrong and still believe you were the honorable one.

    Once again, it's you who fails to comprehend simple English, your pride and twisted sense of justice without context or consequence blinding you.  If either of us were down a piece, for example, the deal would have obviously been off.  We had made that clear to each other.  The deal was only for even games.  Also, I may not be an expert-level player, but being able to run up to the top table in the final round of my group means I'm probably decent at evaluating positions from both sides of the board.

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #29

    Irinasdaddy

    SvenB wrote:

    My english is for sure better than your german.

    True, and if we were conversing in German, you'd have a legitimate complaint.  However, we aren't conversing in German, now are we?  

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #30

    Irinasdaddy

    I also find some irony in a person with an online rating of 2000, but a tactics rating of only 1500 (where a computer can't help as much) accusing me of having faults.  

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #31

    ponz111

    Irinasdaddy

    Another problem is the agreement on the prearrangement was vague.

    To agree to a draw if a 3rd person lost and if the position was equal?

    Maybe at the point you wanted a draw your opponent did not think the position was equal--then he would have every right even under your shady agreement to continue playing for a win.

    Maybe he thought that he had just the slightest of edges and wanted to play for a win?  And in fact, he did beat you.

    Just because you declare the position was equal does not mean your opponent has to agree with you.  Apparently he did not  agree with you and , if so, he did not even violate your so called agreement with him.

    Who do you think looked bad by walking out as you did? You or your opponent?

  • 14 months ago · Quote · #32

    Irontiger

    Irinasdaddy wrote:
    r_k_ting wrote:

    Irinasdaddy, it's you who still can't join the dots. You somehow believe your opponent is honor bound to uphold his agreement to cheat. And you punish his "dishonorable" behaviour by breaking the rules yet again. Your two wrongs don't make a right.

    That's like saying "If you don't rob the bank with me as agreed, I'll kill your pet greyhound and leave his carcass in your bed." That you subscribe to this thieve's honor is a slight on your character, not my comprehension.

    Just in case you missed the point again, your opponent is honor bound not to cheat. He ended up doing the right thing. You committed wrong after wrong and still believe you were the honorable one.

    Once again, it's you who fails to comprehend simple English, your pride and twisted sense of justice without context or consequence blinding you.  If either of us were down a piece, for example, the deal would have obviously been off.  We had made that clear to each other.  The deal was only for even games.  Also, I may not be an expert-level player, but being able to run up to the top table in the final round of my group means I'm probably decent at evaluating positions from both sides of the board.

    Assuming the position was really equal despite the final outcome, which I would not bet on coming from a U1750...

    r_k_king's point, that you seem to misunderstand, is that although "honor" or whatever commands you to hold your word, it also commands you not to pre-agree to a draw (not talking about official rules here). You just cannot rely on "thieves honor" to hold the word to break a rule, and act like you were unfairly betrayed afterwards. The "deal" has not been respected, but it wasn't proper to make in the first place, so you could expect that someone who agrees to that deal could break it.

     

     

    Personal uninteresting note : I am currently playing the last game in a group of a chess 960 tournament. I am first place in the group if I win or draw and second if I lose, so I am sure to qualify for the next round, whereas my opponent needs a draw at least to qualify. He offered me a draw at move 3 (without any explanation, but the meaning was clear). Even in a real tournament with money on the line I would consider that not in the spirit of chess.


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