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  • 4 years ago · Quote · #1

    Trlblzr1

    chess.com

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #2

    rdecredico

    Math is a part of everything.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #3

    freelunch

    there are tons of different kinds of math: statistics, applied, logic, geometry, spatial etc. So "excelling in math" is in itself too broad a category for predicting chess skills. However, anyone working with mathematics on a scientific level must be intelligent and possess good logical and structuring capacities. But I feel the same would apply to fysicists, chemists, computer programmers andsoforth.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #4

    MyCowsCanFly

    There might be some skills that are common to solving both types of problems. However, I don't see a direct relationship between math and the end game in chess. If you have found a formula, please share.

    Whatever level of correlation exists between math skills and chess performance, I'm uncertain how this would be useful information.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #5

    orangehonda

    freelunch wrote:

    there are tons of different kinds of math: statistics, applied, logic, geometry, spatial etc. So "excelling in math" is in itself too broad a category for predicting chess skills. However, anyone working with mathematics on a scientific level must be intelligent and possess good logical and structuring capacities. But I feel the same would apply to fysicists, chemists, computer programmers andsoforth.


    +1

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #6

    tabor

    No. Chess is not a mathematical game. You do not have to be a mathematician to play chess.

    It just happens that chess implies a cool, straight forward, clear, ordinate and mehodical way of thinking.

    And, it also just happens that that is found, and needed, in science, more especially in mathematics.

    From there springs the idea of considering chess a mahematical (better scintific) game, as opposed to the emotinal human way of thinking.

    There are more scintific inclined minds playing chess than do humanist or scholar minds (artists, literary persons, blasted politicians)

    Edward Lasker in his delightful book "The Adventure of Chess", writing about what is considered should be the essential faculties of a good chess player said this:

    --intelligence

    --ability to think objectively

    --capacity for abstract thought

    --abilty to distribute attention (over a number of different factror)

    --disciplined will

    --good nerves and self control

    --selfconfidence.


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