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Mental problems of a chess player!


  • 21 months ago · Quote · #1

    TMtinymaster

    Have you ever felt a problem in your mental activity that can be refered to playing chess?

    A very Important bad result of playing chess on our behaviour is that we always try to guess other people's goals.If we call it mind reading , I should say that this mind readings are usually in minus area because it has became our mind's habit to find out what's our opponent' bad plan for us.In the community ,Automatically people become our opponents and we deal with them as a chess player:

    Why did he/she do that?

    -He/She wanted to humilate me.

    -He/She just wanted to abuse me to help himself/herself.

    -He/She thinks that I don't know what he/she wants to do.

    Of course in this black world these thoughts can save us from some dangers but what about when we are in relations with  people who are trusted and we don't know them and what about the people which we like them and they like us.

    It can hurt us !

    And it's better we don't see somethings about them even when they are probably against us.

     

    I could find some articles in the web that proves it can be worst.I have brought one of the best links here with a part of that:

     

    Chess is Bad for Your Mind :

    "GM Akiba Rubenstein was another chess player who had mental problems. He suffered general schizophrenia, as well as an abnormal fear of people and society. These problems resulted in his departure from competitive chess in 1932, and his mental condition is reported to have actually saved his life. When the Nazis arrived at his asylum to lead him to the death camps his condition was such that they decided to leave him to his fate."

     

    Tell me have you ever felt something like that in your life?

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #2

    TetsuoShima

    nah i disagree its better to be over cautious then feeling sorry. But yes you are right chess is great it makes us way more smarter.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #3

    TMtinymaster

    TetsuoShima wrote:

    nah i disagree its better to be over cautious then feeling sorry. But yes you are right chess is great it makes us way more smarter.

    I advise you to look deeper in your behaviour and then reply again.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #4

    DrSpudnik

    This issue has come up before. Most chess players are not insane. Some insane people seem to play chess.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #5

    kco

    DrSpudnik wrote:

    This issue has come up before. Most chess players are not insane. Some insane people seem to play chess.

    We know who excatly we are talking about don't we ?  Wink

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #6

    cesurpawn

    morphy killed himself and fisher crazy ,these are well known crazy chess people

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #7

    TMtinymaster

    cesurpawn wrote:

    morphy killed himself and fisher crazy ,these are well known crazy chess people

    Thanks for your comment.The angelic soul of the eastern people is always honorable.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #8

    TetsuoShima

    cesurpawn wrote:

    morphy killed himself and fisher crazy ,these are well known crazy chess people

    well morphy died of stroke in the shower after a long walk and Fischer never ever was crazy. There is a tiny difference between a person who is crazy and a person who says something you dont like to hear.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #9

    CBA

    TetsuoShima wrote:
    cesurpawn wrote:

    morphy killed himself and fisher crazy ,these are well known crazy chess people

    well morphy died of stroke in the shower after a long walk and Fischer never ever was crazy. There is a tiny difference between a person who is crazy and a person who says something you dont like to hear.

    Depends how you define "crazy". You can have mental problems - as Fischer did - without being crazy. This has been debated fully in many other threads. One thing I'd like to add though is how "special", it seems, many chess players want to feel. "Oh, we're so on the border between genius and madness"; "Chess makes you see too much"; "Aren't we all such tortured souls." Thing is, mental illness affects people in all walks of life. There may well be something about chess that attracts obsessive, socially disfunctional types - but please, let's keep a sense of perspective.

    Now if you'll excuse me, I have to finish counting the number of bricks that make up my house.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #10

    TetsuoShima

    no Fischer didnt have mental problems, just because people say it doesnt make it true.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #11

    TetsuoShima

    also obsessive and socially disfunction is not actually a mental illness its just a personality trait. Not to mention that there are millions of chessplayers so necessarily we have all type of personalities in chess.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #12

    CBA

    Er...yes he did. From a very young child. His upbringing didn't help. But there's little point in a debate here.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #13

    GenghisCant

    I saw an interview with Magnus Carlsen where he was asked about his mental state and if he worries that chess may make him a little mad one day.

    He said that, for him, it is a slight concern as it seems to have happened to some other brilliant minded players in the past. He doesn't worry about it frequently, but it is always in the back of his mind.

    Of course, I don't have enough knowledge on the subject to give much more than an opinion based on limited understanding. I just thought it was an interesting response, by Magnus, to an interesting question.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #14

    CBA

    To become the best at anything, you have to devote your life to it. That sort of obsession can cause all sorts of problems - particularly if you're that way inclined in the first place.

    I think one interesting aspect of all of this (and perhaps one not so widely debated on these forums) is how many chess players in fiction are evil. It seems to be shorthand in films particularly - if you want to show someone is an evil genius, a mad plotter, a ruthless cold-blooded killer...show them playing chess.

    I think that's why I turned into an evil, ruthless maniac anyhow.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #15

    eddysallin

    CBA wrote:

    Er...yes he did. From a very young child. His upbringing didn't help. But there's little point in a debate here.

    Fischer was obsessive and did'nt care much for people his age unless they played chess.Gawky and unsure except for chess.Could care less about school work.This pretty much describes teenagers.All young people tend too over do something they enjoy, e.g. music, sports. We are all limited ,and have good / bad points. Why not remember his great chess games ?

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #16

    manic13

    CBA wrote:

    Er...yes he did. From a very young child. His upbringing didn't help. But there's little point in a debate here.

    Yeah everyone listen to CBA he was Fischer's pal he knows things...

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #17

    orchard_littlejoe

    Not too sure we are really on the same page. Are you being distracted from playing chess? Chess is a game. A fun game at that. The more you practice, the better you get. Pieces that try to dominate 64 sqaures. The checkmating of the king.

    As far as relating the game to philosophy or mathmatics, I wouldn't get that deep.  

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #18

    CBA

    OK. apart from psychiatrists, let's look at what his fellow chess players thought:

    "At a 1958 tournament in Yugoslavia, Mikhail Tal, a legendary attacking grandmaster and one-time world champion, mocked chess prodigy Bobby Fischer for being “cuckoo.” Tal’s taunting may have been a deliberate attempt to rattle Fischer, then just 15 but already a major force in the highly competitive world of high-level chess. But others from that world — including a number of grandmasters who’d spent time with him — thought Fischer not just eccentric, but deeply troubled. At a tournament in Bulgaria four years later, U.S. grandmaster Robert Byrne suggested that Fischer see a psychiatrist, to which Fischer replied that “a psychiatrist ought to pay [me] for the privilege of working on [my] brain.”
    According to journalist Dylan Loeb McClain, Hungarian-born grandmaster Pal Benko commented, “I am not a psychiatrist, but it was obvious he was not normal. … I told him, ‘You are paranoid,’ and he said that ‘paranoids can be right.’”

     

    *if you have time, this is an interesting read

    http://www.psmag.com/culture-society/a-psychological-autopsy-of-bobby-fischer-25959/

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #19

    manic13

    orchard_littlejoe wrote:

    Not too sure we are really on the same page. Are you being distracted from playing chess? Chess is a game. A fun game at that. The more you practice, the better you get. Pieces that try to dominate 64 sqaures. The checkmating of the king.

    As far as relating the game to philosophy or mathmatics, I wouldn't get that deep.  

    Chess is not fun like playing ''Super Mario'' on Gameboy or ''Hide n seek'' in the woods. And almost everything is related to philosophy or mathematics

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #20

    CBA

    I'd also recommend the book Bobby Fischer Goes To War. It's primarily about the big match-up with Spassky. Well written and my favourite chess book (mostly because it's not a list of chess games).


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