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National master rating?


  • 4 years ago · Quote · #1

    jdknowledge123

    I'm a 1450-1500 player and I was wondering what it would take to reach the title of national master in about 2 and a half year?

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #2

    orangehonda

    It depends on your age and natural talent for the game of course...

    But if i had to guess, for the average person... I'd say ~8 hours a day 5-6 days a week, >10 tournaments a year, a coach wouldn't hurt, a passion for the game would be a must.

    Actually I'd have to revise that.  For the average person this may not be possible at all really.  2 and a half years wouldn't normally be enough time.  Of course it's not impossible, just unlikely.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #3

    DrSpudnik

    You're 30 and only 1450-1500. (You didn't say how many years you have been playing.) Still, I'd say, don't bother. You may become a good chessplayer by studying 3-5 hours a day and playing in tournaments every weekend. But I'd say you are most likely to top out at about 1900.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #4

    Estragon

    Making master starting at 30 is a long shot at best.  But is that the reason you play the game? 

    If playing, learning, studying, and improving brings you pleasure, do it.  No one can say where it could lead.  Some people do start late and make master.  Some start young and never make Class A/First Category.  It depends upon your natural ability, your ability to learn, and the amount of practice you can get against good competition at the level you are currently upon.

    As long as learning and study are fun and exciting to you, it doesn't really matter where you will end up.  If it is drudgery to you, why subject yourself to it at all?

    At the end of the day, it's a game.  You have to enjoy the game, or it isn't worth your time.  Only you can draw those lines.  Have fun, and don't worry about artificial goals and timelines.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #5

    musiclife

    Yeah, people are not machines...there is no preset input to get a determined result.  Unless that is death, in which case shoot the person.  But even that doesn't always work.

    Not that I know.

    And getting better as an adult is really possible, but you must realize what it takes to get better.  One thing often forgotten about is removing misconceptions...tough to work on that without talking to stronger chess players than you.

     

    Best!

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #6

    happyfanatic

    The only way to know is to try. 

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #7

    nimzo5

    1400 player 2.5 years of hard study and dedication = 1800. :)

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #8

    RoJac

    Just do it!

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #9

    dazbedford

    I think its important to set goals and set a time frame for those goals or how do you measure them? I do think that 2 years or so will be difficult to reach that level but at least you have a goal, most people have a pipe dream but never really do anything about it, give it a go and if your not there in 2 years asses were you are and set another goal, if you are there in 2 years well done and the go for Fide Master

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #10

    legoman10

    RoJac wrote:

    Just do it!


     I agree with him all the way.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #11

    planeden

    what is the reason that starting late (like 30...practically old folks home material) makes it so much more difficult?  is it that you miss the prime learning opportunity of being young, that by 30 you have a job and other things that get in the way, or what? 

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #12

    musiclife

    I think it's a confluence of factors.  Foremost, kids can take in new information generally faster than adults.  And there are a boatload of patterns to learn, and get practice with.  As adults we already have so many patterns/set approaches to things, and to really learn them you have to practice.  Adults have less free time to do such things.

    I've taught quite a few adults who are trying to start to learn the violin, and I say early on that to really start progressing, you need to play every day, or 6 days a week, minimum FIVE minutes...and maybe you'd be surprised by how many people cannot actually make that happen. 

    I think it's similar in chess.  To really build your brain, there is a consistency in practice needed that is rarely there unless one really enjoys it, and can't do without it.  I think adults are often more driven by ego and the idea of what being a master means.  But enjoying the work to get there?  Gotta whet that fire...which IMHO kids just seem to have more of than a typical adult.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #13

    Hypocrism

    I'm 18 starting to take chess seriously, probably around 1700-1800 FIDE. To me, improving and playing is the fun part of chess and if I happen to gain a title along the way, even better!

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #14

    planeden

    thanks musiclife, i think that makes sense.  kinda what i was getting at, but you defined it for me quite well.  i guess i will get rid of these 50,000 positions i have been downloading...heh.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #15

    Martin_Stahl

    planeden wrote:

    thanks musiclife, i think that makes sense.  kinda what i was getting at, but you defined it for me quite well.  i guess i will get rid of these 50,000 positions i have been downloading...heh.


    No, you're supposed to download them, make them into a movie, and watch them every chance you get Surprised

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #16

    dannyhume

    planeden wrote:

    what is the reason that starting late (like 30...practically old folks home material) makes it so much more difficult?  is it that you miss the prime learning opportunity of being young, that by 30 you have a job and other things that get in the way, or what? 


    All of that.  But at the same time, I have yet to hear of beginner adults who truly devote a consistently huge portion of their daily adult life to becoming a master, whereas you hear about lots of kids whose lives center on chess.

    In response to those who say "but is that really the reason you play chess?"...a person may enjoy chess regardless of how much or how little s/he studies or plays, but when that someone asks a serious question about timeline towards a title, please keep in mind that s/he loves chess enough to be at a crossroads in his/her life trying to decide exactly how much time to devote to chess at the risk of consistently alienating friends and family.   So it would be nice to get a realistic and respectful response from those who have accomplished the feat or have witnesses the paths of others rather than hear the trite "you should compulsively study and play chess 3-4 hours a day and anger everyone around you with because you enjoy it, not becuase you expect a title, and if they can't understand why you ignore them daily for 90% of your free time, then they just don't care about you". 

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #17

    mnag

    planeden

    I started playing tournament chess when I was 26 in 1972. With little study, about 4-5 hours a month (!), it took me 13 years (until 1985) to go over 2200. I had kids a job and education to worry about. Only when I began playing mostly experts and masters did I improve sufficiently. It takes a while and only if you are lucky and persistent.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #18

    musiclife

    I've improved 300+ points in the last year, but I've been playing chess during a significant chunk of my free time for about 2 years.  Granted 6 months of that I was in school and dropped playing almost entirely.  It's quite possible, but there is no formula of 'x amount of time' gets you x rating points. 

    If you really want to maximize your time, go buy a chess coach.  They will get you practicing most relevant things and work with you to improve.  Dan Heisman is one of the best.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #19

    nimzo5

    dannyhume wrote:
    planeden wrote:

    what is the reason that starting late (like 30...practically old folks home material) makes it so much more difficult?  is it that you miss the prime learning opportunity of being young, that by 30 you have a job and other things that get in the way, or what? 


    All of that.  But at the same time, I have yet to hear of beginner adults who truly devote a consistently huge portion of their daily adult life to becoming a master, whereas you hear about lots of kids whose lives center on chess.

    In response to those who say "but is that really the reason you play chess?"...a person may enjoy chess regardless of how much or how little s/he studies or plays, but when that someone asks a serious question about timeline towards a title, please keep in mind that s/he loves chess enough to be at a crossroads in his/her life trying to decide exactly how much time to devote to chess at the risk of consistently alienating friends and family.   So it would be nice to get a realistic and respectful response from those who have accomplished the feat or have witnesses the paths of others rather than hear the trite "you should compulsively study and play chess 3-4 hours a day and anger everyone around you with because you enjoy it, not becuase you expect a title, and if they can't understand why you ignore them daily for 90% of your free time, then they just don't care about you". 


     I started playing chess around age 30 - I have played off and on for 6 years now and I can tell you that if you want to get better at the game, it will take some serious time. If that doesn't fit your schedule or you feel guilty because it is time away from your family - then that is something you will need to resolve for yourself. Chess is no different than golf, tennis, photography, astronomy etc. how a hobby fits in yourl life is a personal decision. 

    I think you could be a decent club player and not study 4 hours a day. But if you want to be a master.. expect to make serious sacrifices. 

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #20

    planeden

    wow, thanks for all the responses.  but i feel a bit bad.  i have no desire to be a master because i already know that i do not have the time or dedication to do it.  sure, i would like to improve (and have been since joing this site just a few months ago), but i don't think this hobby is heading in the direcitno of tournaments, even.  it is just common in all these threads about becoming a master after starting late in life is hard and i was just curious why. 


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