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New to chess


  • 8 months ago · Quote · #1

    Ryan_Davidson

    I am new to chess and range around a 1200 player. I do not know any chess openings but am good at chess tactics. Bad luck here on chess.com (guessing cuase of people knowing opeings) But other places I have played chess against people I would win by using unusual openings to where they cannot simply go by a "Book" so to speak.

    I love chess, it is my fav thing to play. I am fairly good as I can look at a certain position and being able to think moves ahead, rather than just making moves that seem good at the time without looking at the consequences of such a move.

    Im basically just asking is it even possible for me to become really good at chess without learning and memorizing "books" of chess openings? Or am I better off learning chess on my own? Originally taught myself from just playing a computer (learned the moves, how to castle, exc and just played and played and played and played till Ive became fairly good), and because of which when I play human players and im looking at the certain position I expect that player to make the best possible move that I would against what I have played.

    I dont want to just rant on and on, basically should I take time and only study chess openings,middle, and end games? Or continue to play as a "tactics" player and can sit and anaylze the position and think of the best possible move. (Im slow at anaylzing but can eventually find the best possible move from thinking an average of 4-5 moves ahead,  timed games is where i lose though cause im slow at anaylzing)

    Forgive me if ive mispelled anything, not the greatest speller.

  • 8 months ago · Quote · #2

    Estragon

    You don't need to know "opening theory" until you get much more advanced, and even then memorizing lines is the worst way to try to learn it, it wastes time and effort.

    For now, this page of advice on the general principles is enough to consider.  Learn the basic checkmates including K+Q, K+R, and K+2B, and begin to study the simplest pawn endings to learn how to force a pawn through to Queen.  Other than that, play as much as you can, as slow a time control as you can (speed chess is not helpful to beginners) and go back over the games you play to find the mistakes - the idea being not to make the same oversights again.

    Good luck, and good chess!  The greatest thing about the game is that no matter what level you are on or can achieve, you can derive much enjoyment and stimulation from playing it and seeing the games of others, too.

  • 8 months ago · Quote · #3

    Ryan_Davidson

    Estragon wrote:

    You don't need to know "opening theory" until you get much more advanced, and even then memorizing lines is the worst way to try to learn it, it wastes time and effort.

    For now, this page of advice on the general principles is enough to consider.  Learn the basic checkmates including K+Q, K+R, and K+2B, and begin to study the simplest pawn endings to learn how to force a pawn through to Queen.  Other than that, play as much as you can, as slow a time control as you can (speed chess is not helpful to beginners) and go back over the games you play to find the mistakes - the idea being not to make the same oversights again.

    Good luck, and good chess!  The greatest thing about the game is that no matter what level you are on or can achieve, you can derive much enjoyment and stimulation from playing it and seeing the games of others, too.

    Thanks for fast and very helpful advice :)

    Usually I do no need to go back over games I have played because I learn my mistakes as soon as I move (before my oppenent moves I realize a move I missed during my anaylings the position and just pray to god he doesnt see it) But again, thanks for fast and helpful insight.

    Edit: That link was very helpful. Id sometimes move too many pawn moves in the start to cover other pawns. And much more helpful information.


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