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Opponent breaking principles and winning


  • 20 months ago · Quote · #21

    JG27Pyth

    Lol on the N fork in game 3... (I find the java engine is strong in those pawn promotion N v R positions in general...).  

    Good games though... yeah my long blather about putting pieces on the right squares etc. ehhh it's all hot air -- I should stop trying to explain my wacky opening ideas in a paragraph, it's useless and absurd -- Pfren sums it up right -- play better *and don't miss tactics*  

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #22

    waffllemaster

    Hah, thanks :)  Actually I wondered whether I should post it or not because I thought your description was good and maybe the games woudln't be very useful.  I especially liked mentioning you have to put your pieces on good squares... these examples didn't have one, but against humans who do odd openings often I'll think I'm punishing them, but because of 1 or 2 bad development moves I have to waste time re-deploying and poof, we're already equal or I may even be worse.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #23

    MatchStickKing

    My chess instructor told me that when playing chess, an old saying applies: 'flatten your heart'. That is, don't let emotions get the better of you. This was in reply to a series of games I lost where my opponent was playing 1. b4 and pushing pawns all over the place - I got really annoyed that I should have to waste my time playing against this 'garbage' chess, and set out to refute my opponents obvious opening mistakes with aggression. I would find myself later with my tail between my legs as my early aggression ran out of steam to find myself in long term positional trouble nearly every time.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #24

    daval89

    OK .. so first of all, sorry for not answering but I did'nt noticed I had comments XD , apparently i wasn't following them on my inbox. duh!

    second, thank you for all your comments i have really enjoyed reading all of them some of them have made me laugh :) they all have been really helpfull.

    many ppl have requested an example and I wil be giving it ASAP . I agree with some of you who said they can't really help me with abstract ideas so ill be posting a game in the next days ( maybe today) and to the rest who gave me abstract ideas, they still where helpfull so ty again :)

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #25

    TitanCG

    In chess the attacker wins. So sooner or later you'll have to do something with your better position. Tricky computers exploit that and force you to do something about their "bad" play. That usually involves tactics and that's what they want.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #26

    Xilmi

    I've watched a chess-lecture on youtube 2 days ago. It was exactly about that.

    The thing is: You need to know how to follow up after you have developed and your opponent hasn't yet.

    Actually it's a pretty simple principle once again: Open up the position (mostly by exchanging pawns).

    If you don't do that quickly, your opponent will eventually catch up in development and all the advantage you had from your early development is in vain. Behind inpenetratable pawn walls it doesn't really matter that much how developed the position is.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #27

    daval89

    this is a game of mine, i'm playing black

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #28

    daval89

    Xilmi escribió:

    I've watched a chess-lecture on youtube 2 days ago. It was exactly about that.

    The thing is: You need to know how to follow up after you have developed and your opponent hasn't yet.

    Actually it's a pretty simple principle once again: Open up the position (mostly by exchanging pawns).

    If you don't do that quickly, your opponent will eventually catch up in development and all the advantage you had from your early development is in vain. Behind inpenetratable pawn walls it doesn't really matter that much how developed the position is.

    :)  I had an aproximate idea , trade pawns.

    can you please share with me that video??

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #29

    benkku52

    Interesting thread, daval. I've been raging about this kind of play more often than I'd want to. Someone else posted the fine advice to keep cool in situations like this, but the problem is that if you meet this kind of pawn-pushers in a game with short time control they've got two chances of running you over: either because you lose your temper and blunder trying to crack their pawn wall or because you try to beat them in a well-thought way and get into time trouble. Meanwhile, they're sticking to their "system"; probably they play the exact same moves in every game.

    Your game is a good example. Your opponent belonged to the better and more dangerous category of pawn-pushers, he didn't make too many totally senseless moves, but he missed a few obvious opportunities to trouble you earlier in the game.

    I took some time to analyse your game with Fritz 11 and add my own thoughts. I think you made two important positional mistakes that happen often against this kind of players:

    1. developing your bishop too early and to a square where it doesn't do any harm but can be attacked easily, and

    2. blocking a good retreat square for your f6-knight with your queen after White had already played g4.

    Still, this would have been reparable.

    Here's the game:


    plus two examples from a 3-day-correspondence tournament where I had to play an inferior pawn pusher (the f3 and c3 category) but still managed almost to slip at least with Black. I only added them to show that once you survived the opening, you'll often find that one single mistake by them ruins their entire position and they are lost because they actually don't now the first thing about chess.





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