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OTB Blitz Ruling Question?


  • 24 months ago · Quote · #1

    LazyChessPlayer3201

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 24 months ago · Quote · #2

    LazyChessPlayer3201

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 24 months ago · Quote · #3

    Roeczak

    ask Geurt

  • 24 months ago · Quote · #4

    LazyChessPlayer3201

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 24 months ago · Quote · #5

    LazyChessPlayer3201

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 24 months ago · Quote · #6

    bobbyDK

    especially in endgame a lot of players make a move as soon as you make yours. if you hit the clock he will hit it back because it made his move before you can hit the clock.
    It is very messy. and as a result your opponent doesn't use a second on his clock.

  • 24 months ago · Quote · #7

    MoonlessNight

    bobbyDK wrote:

    especially in endgame a lot of players make a move as soon as you make yours. if you hit the clock he will hit it back because it made his move before you can hit the clock.
    It is very messy. and as a result your opponent doesn't use a second on his clock.

    Is this legal though? I do this sometimes so I want to know

  • 24 months ago · Quote · #8

    MoonlessNight

    I was playing my sister once, and since I was much stronger I started with 20 sec (no delay) but I soon saw her clock was not ticking down! Turns out she was hitting the clock... And then making her move!

  • 24 months ago · Quote · #9

    Scottrf

    LazyChessPlayer3201 wrote:

    http://www.chess.com/members/view/Geurt if this is Guert, then explian how this person can help. He's played all most 0 games and seems very inactive.

    geurtgijssen@chesscafe.com

    FIDE Arbiter

    http://www.chesscafe.com/geurt/geurt.htm

    This was raised after Krush-Zatonskih, and it seems that you can start moving your piece before the opponent presses the clock but can't complete the move.

    http://main.uschess.org/content/view/8476/456/

  • 24 months ago · Quote · #10

    LazyChessPlayer3201

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 24 months ago · Quote · #11

    bobbyDK

    @Lazychessplayer, even though it isn't legal I doubt you will find a tournament leader not allowing this. imagine all the claims of not having the possibility to complete moves.
    are we limiting it to blitz games?
    in longer games if people forget to hit the clock are we allowed to make a move or should we silently wait for the opponent to complete their move.

  • 24 months ago · Quote · #12

    Estragon

    You are allowed in blitz to move in response to the opponent's move, it is just not possible to monitor every move in every game without instant replay officials at every board, and that's laughable.

    The one thing that cannot be skirted is your right to stop your clock.  Even if the opponent has moved before you can do it, he must allow you to do it.

  • 24 months ago · Quote · #13

    Robbie960

    Why would you move when your opponent hasn't punched the clock!? I learned that OTB; sit quietly and let their time keep running...

  • 24 months ago · Quote · #14

    Estragon

    hrobert5 wrote:

    Why would you move when your opponent hasn't punched the clock!? I learned that OTB; sit quietly and let their time keep running...

    In blitz it is quite common for a player getting short of time to move as soon as his opponent has released his own piece.  This is now legal under FIDE & USCF rules for blitz tournaments and playoffs, but both require that a player MUST be allowed to stop his own clock after every move. 

    The reason for this is that on older analog clocks the responding player would bang out his reply and hold his own button down so the first player couldn't stop his own clock - that practice is now illegal.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #15

    LazyChessPlayer3201

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 23 months ago · Quote · #16

    SmyslovFan

    FIDE blitz time control is 3 minutes with a 2 second delay. The two second delay makes it possible to enforce the clock rule.

    Here are two links that should help:

    http://www.fide.com/FIDE/handbook/Regulations_World_Blitz_2012.pdf

    and

    http://www.fide.com/component/handbook/?id=125&view=article

     

    • An illegal move is completed once the opponent's clock has been started. The opponent is then entitled to claim that the player completed an illegal move before the claimant has made his move. Only after such a claim, shall the arbiter make a ruling. However, if both Kings are in check or the promotion of a pawn is not completed, the arbiter shall intervene, if possible.
      1. The flag is considered to have fallen when a player has made a valid claim to that effect. The arbiter shall refrain from signalling a flag fall, but he may do so if both flags have fallen.
      2. To claim a win on time, the claimant must stop both clocks and notify the arbiter. For the claim to be successful, the claimant’s flag must remain up and his opponent’s flag down after the clocks have been stopped.
      3. If both flags have fallen as described in (1) and (2), the arbiter shall declare the game drawn.

     

    B. Blitz

    B.1

    A ‘blitz’ game’ is one where all the moves must be made in a fixed time of less than 15 minutes for each player; or the allotted time + 60 times any increment is less than 15 minutes.

    B.2

    Where there is adequate supervision of play, (one arbiter for one game) the Competition Rules and Appendix A.2 shall apply.

    B.3

    Where supervision is inadequate the following shall apply:

    1. Play shall be governed by the Rapidplay Laws as in Appendix A except where they are overridden by the following Laws of Blitz.
    2. Article 10.2 and Appendix A.4.c do not apply.
    3. An illegal move is completed once the opponent’s clock has been started. The opponent is entitled to claim a win before he has made his own move. However, if the opponent cannot checkmate the player’s king by any possible series of legal moves, then the claimant is entitled to claim a draw before he has made his own move. Once the opponent has made his own move, an illegal move cannot be corrected unless mutually agreed without intervention of an arbiter.

     

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #17

    LazyChessPlayer3201

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 23 months ago · Quote · #18

    SmyslovFan

    Most arbiters will give a warning the first time it happens. If a player moves on his opponent's time a second time, the player may forfeit the game. That rule is the same as in rapid-play.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #19

    Robbie960

    @Estragon:

    I understand the reasoning, I just maintain that I'd be ready but I wouldn't do anything until they punched the clock. I've watched too many opponents FORGET to punch the clock and I'll just wait them out and let it run.

  • 23 months ago · Quote · #20

    Estragon

    hrobert5 wrote:

    @Estragon:

    I understand the reasoning, I just maintain that I'd be ready but I wouldn't do anything until they punched the clock. I've watched too many opponents FORGET to punch the clock and I'll just wait them out and let it run.

    I think we are talking about different things. 

    When you are running low on time in a blitz game and you can move instantly, you use no time at all if your opponent is prevented from hitting his clock by your hand getting there first, which is why the rule requires that a player is always allowed to stop his clock to complete his move. 

    This occurs in all GM blitz events and in tiebreak playoffs for OTB tournaments.


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