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Pawn Promotion to... Bishop?


  • 3 years ago · Quote · #1

    heidirlynn

    There's a question I've been pondering for many years and finally need some resolution.

    You know in a chess game, when you finally get a pawn to the other side and have the opportunity to promote him to a better piece?

    who in their right mind would choose a bishop or a rook over a queen?  I can understand sometimes a knight, if the L-shape is tactically to your advantage.  But a bishop or rook can only move diagonally or laterally, whereas the queen can do both. Seems like a pretty obvious choice.

    Just curious, has anyone here actually chosen a bishop or rook in this situation?  And if so... why?  self-hatred?  amusement?  satire?

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #2

    wbbaxterbones

    Sometimes a queen would cause stalemate.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #3

    heidirlynn

    Oh. I was hoping it was satire.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #4

    planeden

    i've never done it in a game, but there are several puzzles where underpromoting to a rook is required.  i have seen some where you have to promote to a bishop, but these seem like the are constructed specically so you have to promote to a bishop rather than resembly a real game situation. 

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #5

    ivandh

    heidirlynn wrote:

    Oh. I was hoping it was satire.


    That too.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #6

    Orangel

    I was just wondering if it would ever be appropritate to have him ramain a pawn.  To me, it's the most appealing shape there is.  Plus, he's kind of a scrappy little guy. 

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #7

    goldendog

    I wonder when it's good to promote to a checker.

    Just wondering.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #8

    Tyzer

    Bishop underpromotions are the least common by a significant margin, but they do happen on very rare occasions. As mentioned above, it's usually for stalemate reasons.

    It's much more common to see the idea in puzzles though.

     

    Orangel wrote:

    I was just wondering if it would ever be appropritate to have him ramain a pawn.  To me, it's the most appealing shape there is.  Plus, he's kind of a scrappy little guy. 


    There used to be a rule allowing that; but it was removed. In any case, that kind of situation did appear in some puzzles; but the chances of that happening in a real game are probably infinitesimal. (The wording of the original rule also seemed to allow promotion to an enemy piece; but that was patched too.)

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #9

    ivandh

    The most common case of underpromotion is to humiliate your opponent.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #10

    heavyop

    goldendog wrote:

    I wonder when it's good to promote to a checker.

    Just wondering.


    What happens if you declare "king me" when you promote?!?

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #11

    planeden

    heavyop wrote:
    goldendog wrote:

    I wonder when it's good to promote to a checker.

    Just wondering.


    What happens if you declare "king me" when you promote?!?


    silly rabbit, you can't promote to a king. 

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #12

    MrEdCollins

    In this composition, which won first prize in a composing contest in 1933, it's White to play, and win.  In order to win he must first underpromote to a knight, then later a bishop, and then later a rook!

    http://www.edcollins.com/chess/under-promote.htm

     

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #13

    HessianWarrior

    wbbaxterbones wrote:

    Sometimes a queen would cause stalemate.


    Exactly, I had game where a Queen would have caused a stalemate but the Rook was a winner.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #14

    Hendrik77

    Sometimes Queen is such overkill, that I don`t mind choosing rook or bishop. They`ll do the job just as well.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #15

    bradley348

    to humiliate my opponent, i sometimes make a big deal about promoting EVERY surviving pawn to a queen (and hiding these queens behind other pieces, so i dont stale mate) and then bringing them out in a hilarious fashion to kill the king

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #16

    brianb42

    bradley348 wrote:

    to humiliate my opponent, i sometimes make a big deal about promoting EVERY surviving pawn to a queen (and hiding these queens behind other pieces, so i dont stale mate) and then bringing them out in a hilarious fashion to kill the king


    Generally you save that for an opponent that refuses to resign in a completely lost position. They have zero hope of winning and no real hope of a draw yet they won't give up.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #17

    bradley348

    yeah, those are the ones.

    specially the ones that spam the "DRAW" button when they see all hope is lost

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #18

    Crazychessplaya

    Sometimes an underpromotion to a bishop is the quickest way to checkmate.

    Sam Loyd, mate in 3 moves:

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #19

    birdbirdbird

    ivandh wrote:

    The most common case of underpromotion is to humiliate your opponent.


    yup, and it works too.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #20

    ivandh

    Crazychessplaya wrote:

    Sometimes an underpromotion to a bishop is the quickest way to checkmate.

    Sam Loyd, mate in 3 moves:

     

     


    Since we're talking about underpromotion it would seem that a rook would be somewhat more apt. But I am not going to argue with the esteemed Mr. Loyd.


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