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Play Someone You Know You Can Beat Easily or Don't Play at All?


  • 21 months ago · Quote · #1

    MrBoB1

    Is it more beneficial to play someone you can beat easily, or not play at all if you want to improve as a chess player?

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #2

    Snar

    for you, it can help a little but not a lot

    but I would still play because the other guy will be helped greatly

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #3

    BorgQueen

    Play, but use a handicap.

    I always prefer to play.  I often play a mate who is "easy meat" so to balance it up we use a time handicap... whoever wins loses a minute from their clock and the loser gains a minute... we start at 11 and 4.  Do that until your time is only 1 minute and your friend should start winning some games!  If you still always win then use material handicap as well!

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #4

    JacksofClubs

    you should always play stronger opposition. However, if a certain opponent would have some sort of insurmountable ridiculous advantage for whatever reason then...  I mean would you play poker against someone who has stacked the deck or has x-ray vision? probably not.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #5

    chesstoimpress123

    It's good to play higher opposition, just not ridiculously higher opposition. Even then, though, you would still be learning from their style of play.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #6

    BorgQueen

    lol @ Jacks

    Yeah, comparing handicap chess to playing poker against someone with XRay vision is very logical. 

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #7

    JacksofClubs

    BorgQueen wrote:

    lol @ Jacks

    Yeah, comparing handicap chess to playing poker against someone with XRay vision is very logical. 

    I wasn't comparing handicap chess to playing poker against someone with x-ray vision.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #8

    MyCowsCanFly

    I'm against using x-ray vision in poker. I don't see any advantage to x-ray vision in chess. Those glasses are pretty easy to detect so I can't imagine enforcing a ban would be a problem. I think the use of ESP presents more of a problem.

    Its still very much of a challenge for me not to make mistakes even against a weaker opponent, game after game. The goal becomes reducing my error rate over time.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #9

    BorgQueen

    JacksofClubs wrote:
    BorgQueen wrote:

    lol @ Jacks

    Yeah, comparing handicap chess to playing poker against someone with XRay vision is very logical. 

    I wasn't comparing handicap chess to playing poker against someone with x-ray vision.

    I still found it a funny comment :-)

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #10

    JacksofClubs

    just the truth.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #11

    Estragon

    Don't you appreciate the occasional opportunity to play a much stronger player?  What right would you have to expect them to play you if you refuse to play those weaker than you?

    Consider it part of paying your dues to get better.  The game itself won't help much, but it is part of the system.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #12

    b1_

    When you want to develope your opening repertoire, play someone stronger and steal theirs :).

    The real benefits of playing someone stronger is if you can get them to discuss the game afterward and explain their moves.

    (X-ray vision in chess is good when playing against sexy women.)

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #13

    BorgQueen

    Even if I were playing the very best players, I would be happy losing... just for the opportunity to learn from the best!

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #14

    SmyslovFan

    Time handicaps are good ways to balance out playing levels for people ~600 rating points apart. Start both sides with 7 minutes and subtract 60 seconds for every 100 rating points difference.

    The problem is that if the real playing difference is greater than 600 points, the stronger player will win every game even if they only have a minute to make all their moves.

    So, rather than play someone who is much weaker than you, teach that person! Teaching will strengthen both your understanding and your opponent! Soon you'll have helped to create a real sparring partner! If you don't like teaching, study some positions together.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #15

    ClavierCavalier

    MyCowsCanFly wrote:

    I'm against using x-ray vision in poker. I don't see any advantage to x-ray vision in chess. Those glasses are pretty easy to detect so I can't imagine enforcing a ban would be a problem. I think the use of ESP presents more of a problem.

    Its still very much of a challenge for me not to make mistakes even against a weaker opponent, game after game. The goal becomes reducing my error rate over time.

    FIDE will start requiring glasses tests as well as aluminum foil mind sheilds to be worn at all times.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #16

    NimzoRoy

    I play vs 2 pals locally OTB and neither one of them is very challenging (usually) but I do so because it's one way of socializing and not everyone takes the games as seriously as a lot of us do here at chess.com. It does tend to make me sloppy OTB but since this is about the only OTB chess I play I'm not too concerned here, however if I was playing other serious OTB games I'd probably treat these casual games more seriously, ie start using a clock and recording the moves.

    Some responses have recommended always playing "stronger" players which I disagree with - I'd say usually do so, but keep in mind that "weaker" players don't always lose to "stronger" players and if you're going to concentrate on playing stronger opponents you should also give weaker opponents the same opportunties you have - to play someone better.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #17

    BorgQueen

    ▲ Agree.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #18

    BorgQueen

    Actually you can do that here... Not in live, but in OLC you can have takeback games :-)

    Although, usually, people don't tend to use the ability, but it is there if you want it.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #19

    david_plays_chess

    I think you should play any one who is willing to give you a game. Regardless of their talent. If their good, you play hard and learn. If they are beginners, they learn.

    Its more an issue of courtesy than strategy.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #20

    alec44

    MrBoB1 wrote:

    Is it more beneficial to play someone you can beat easily, or not play at all if you want to improve as a chess player?

    I don't believe there's any benefit playing people you beat easily if you study and train hard you should play with opponents that are really good fighters and play a good game to develop your skills and keep them sharp.


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