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Relationship between Chess rating and I.Q?


  • 7 weeks ago · Quote · #501

    ponz111

    awesomechess  I asked for two child prodigy savants. Because a child may be a progidy does not mean he or she is a savant.

  • 7 weeks ago · Quote · #502

    awesomechess1729

    ponz111 wrote:

    awesomechess  I asked for two child prodigy savants. Because a child may be a progidy does not mean he or she is a savant.

    Didn't you just read my previous posts? Read The Immortal Game and the encyclopedia entry I included (which somehow was formatted strangely) - the encyclopedia entry says that savants are not considered prodigies, but there are savants who are very talented in chess.

  • 7 weeks ago · Quote · #503

    Dunk12

    The problem is that IQ is basically how much easily measurable data do you know, and it assesses problem-solving to some extent.

    But chess is just another animal. There have been uneducated, illiterate chess players who have a natural talent for the game. Mir Sultan Khan did not know how to read or write, and so read no chess theory, but is often called the most naturally talented player of all time. He even beat Capablanca.

  • 7 weeks ago · Quote · #504

    ponz111

    awesomechess1729 wrote:
    ponz111 wrote:

    awesomechess  I asked for two child prodigy savants. Because a child may be a progidy does not mean he or she is a savant.

    Didn't you just read my previous posts? Read The Immortal Game and the encyclopedia entry I included (which somehow was formatted strangely) - the encyclopedia entry says that savants are not considered prodigies, but there are savants who are very talented in chess.

    There are savants who are very good in chess but "very good in chess" does not equate to prodigies is all I am saying. "talented in chess" also does not mean "prodigies"

  • 7 weeks ago · Quote · #505

    nameno1had

    I have a relationship with chess ratings and IQ...it is a crazy love triangle


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