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Relationship between Chess rating and I.Q?


  • 6 months ago · Quote · #501

    ponz111

    awesomechess1729 wrote:
    ponz111 wrote:

    awesomechess  I asked for two child prodigy savants. Because a child may be a progidy does not mean he or she is a savant.

    Didn't you just read my previous posts? Read The Immortal Game and the encyclopedia entry I included (which somehow was formatted strangely) - the encyclopedia entry says that savants are not considered prodigies, but there are savants who are very talented in chess.

    There are savants who are very good in chess but "very good in chess" does not equate to prodigies is all I am saying. "talented in chess" also does not mean "prodigies"

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #502

    nameno1had

    I have a relationship with chess ratings and IQ...it is a crazy love triangle

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #503

    idkwtfhell

    Hi,

    Chess rating and IQ should be correlated, but the relationship is unlikely to be one-to-one.  This is the same reason that one person can get quite different scores on two IQ tests:  all tests use a different metric. Some include verbal components, some include mathematical components, some include deductive logic, some only include pattern recognition. 

    Being good at chess doesn't necessarily mean you have intellectual skills that would give you a strong vocabulary, for example.  Yet it is undeniable that verbal ability, on its own, is important.  Yes, some IQ tests only offer logic and pattern problems, and they might correlate more highly with chess ratings than traditional IQ tests.  Still, this neglects other facets of intellectual ability that are to some degree measurable, and are still important. 

    Even two logic tests that are different could, theoretically, lead to different scores if a particular skill is required for one that is not required for the other.  So, there's no reason to believe that chess rating is a strong indication of IQ.  This is the same reason that IQ is kind of a crappy meausre to begin with. 

    Also, modern perspectives on intelligence suggest that working memory is the primary driver of most intelligence.  How much information can you hold in your head, without getting distracted?  This would indeed correlate with IQ and chess rating, but only to an extent.  Once information had been crystalized, and you have long term memory for a strategy, the measure becomes bogus.  Then it's about how much practice you've had than how you can intellectually perform in the moment.  For that reason, I think especially when it comes to high chess ratings and high IQ's the differences are more experience- than ability-based.


    A genius who never reads a book is still a genius.  He's just gonna be bad at reading. 

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #504

    blueemu

    The relationship between Chess and IQ:

    Truly clever people don't waste their time on board-games.

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #505

    rdecredico

    blueemu wrote:

    The relationship between Chess and IQ:

    Truly clever people don't waste their time on board-games.

    +1

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #506

    Yereslov

    blueemu wrote:

    The relationship between Chess and IQ:

    Truly clever people don't waste their time on board-games.

    How is math any different? Outside of basic geometry and arithemetic, most math is only a concern for the mathemetician. 

     By every definition chess players are truly clever.

    clev·er
    ˈklevər/
    adjective
     
    1. quick to understand, learn, and devise or apply ideas; intelligent.
      "a clever and studious young woman"
      synonyms: intelligentbrightsmartastutesharpquick-wittedshrewdMore
       
       
       
       
         
  • 4 months ago · Quote · #507

    sapientdust

    Yereslov wrote:
    blueemu wrote:

    The relationship between Chess and IQ:

    Truly clever people don't waste their time on board-games.

    How is math any different? Outside of basic geometry and arithemetic, most math is only a concern for the mathemetician. 

    Mathematics is baked into the nature of reality. It describes everything about how the universe changes over time from the largest scale to the smallest. Chess not so much, fun though it may be. That's one difference.

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #508

    awesomechess1729

    sapientdust wrote:
    Yereslov wrote:
    blueemu wrote:

    The relationship between Chess and IQ:

    Truly clever people don't waste their time on board-games.

    How is math any different? Outside of basic geometry and arithemetic, most math is only a concern for the mathemetician. 

    Mathematics is baked into the nature of reality. It describes everything about how the universe changes over time from the largest scale to the smallest. Chess not so much, fun though it may be. That's one difference.

    According to the Mathematical Universe Hypothesis (MUH), mathematics might not just describe reality, it might be reality. 

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #509

    AlCzervik

    Math rules.

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #510

    awesomechess1729

    AlCzervik wrote:

    Math rules.

    Agreed.

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #511

    medspex

    AlCzervik írta:

    Math rules.

    AND SO THERES THE WINNER!!!

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #512

    zborg

    Nah.  There's a parallell multiverse.  Deal with it.

    http://www.chess.com/forum/view/general/chess-and-iq-intelligence?page=32

  • 3 months ago · Quote · #513

    uwinagain

    I am clever, so how come I'm not very good?? Wink


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