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Relationship between Chess rating and I.Q?


  • 22 months ago · Quote · #261

    proletariate

    joeydvivre wrote:

    In the US, we spell "categorise" with a "z" not an "s".  Crazychessplaya is just recounting that Americans think that Brits don't know anything about the English language.

    I know, I was just hoping for the rebuttal on it, I was also awaiting the proletariate vs proletariat also....forums are always interesting ;-)

     

    I was gonna type rebuttle, but decided to change it to keep on topic

    Peace

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #262

    zborg

    Glad you cleared that up.  Much appreciated.  Really Peachy Peace.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #263

    Meadmaker

    zborg wrote:

     

    @Ponz111's comment about Super GMs being rather good at blindfold simuls seems like one clear marker for the "pattern recognition" skill needed to perform at the highest levels in chess.


    There's something I don't get about "pattern recognition" and Chess.

     

    When I think about sample questions on IQ tests, a lot of them are of the form, "What's the next number (or shape, or word) in this sequence?"

     

    I generally do a good job on those sorts of tests, especially in numbers and shapes.  Not quite as well on words.

    However, this sort of problem doesn't seem to have very much in common with determining a good Chess move given a board position.  Likewise, distinguishing one face from another isn't very much like the "find the next in the sequence" problem, but surely face recognition is one sort of visual pattern recognition isn't it?

    The "sequence" problems are a staple of IQ tests, and people good at them are likely to have high IQs as a a result.  However, great Chess players do not generally have extremely high IQs.  Some do, but most don't.  On the other hand, there is clearly some element of "pattern recognition" that goes on in the mind of a great Chess player, but is it more like the sequence completion form of pattern recognition, or the face recognition form of pattern recognition, or a completely different form of pattern recognition not correlated with either sequence completion or face recognition?

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #264

    lollolbuddha

    i agee my iq is low 80 and so is my rating ive beeen practicin chess for 10 years

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #265

    Master_Po

    Memory and IQ  go hand in hand.  I suspect strongly that Kasparov and Fischer had great memories.  There are some people that if you add multi talented at music, sports, many multi things, their IQs would be 200+.  I think, with all due respect, Fishcer and Kasparov, if you added sports and music and other things, might not be 200+ but their memory capabilties got them 190.   

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #266

    nameno1had

    DavyWilliams wrote:

    Memory and IQ  go hand in hand.  I suspect strongly that Kasparov and Fischer had great memories.  There are some people that if you add multi talented at music, sports, many multi things, their IQs would be 200+.  I think, with all due respect, Fishcer and Kasparov, if you added sports and music and other things, might not be 200+ but their memory capabilties got them 190.   

    For me this makes sense. It also makes sense to me that, in order for GM's  to be great calculators, they have to have the ability to keep many things available in the their short term memory, to recall them to the forefront of their minds, as well as the positions they've studied for years in their long term memory.

    If you relate it to computers, a fast processor is nothing without an adequate amount of memory and vice versa.  When we are wowed by a computer's ability to be fast and handle multiple tasks without lag, it undoubtedly has both of these components, that are top notch.

    Like really good computers, the brains of the best GM's in particular, not only have to have a really good memory generally, but the ability to quickly go through many computations, while handling the multiple tasks, a fellow GM is capable of throwing at them.

    Hence, wonderful minds, have both great memories and great computing ability. If one or the other were missing, it would be noticed.

    I think the real problem isn't that chess players aren't properly diagnosed for their correct intellectual levels, but instead the problems are with the testing methods themselves.

    I can sight several examples of how this is. The first I love to point out is one of my favorites. How can you isolate raw intelligence, without accessing it via what someone has learned? In other words, if I built a computer with 4 gigahertz processor and a 100 GB hardrive(memory storage long term) and 4- 1 gigahertz memory sticks (short term memory), another with half of those figures and then if I wanted to compare them, I would need information to test them, in the form of a program to compare their performances. Another example of this is, How can you really figure out who has a higher IQ, a 2 year old who can't talk yet or a 50 year old man?

    It is in this way, we have our first bias. We are all fed different information. If we were all fed the exact same information, the standouts in intellect would be more obvious. The last statement, wasn't prejudical or a complaint either.

    I am sure if multiple people are reading this, there is at least one cynical person, looking to pick this apart. Even if they haven't found any credible inconsistencies, compared to the truth, their own biases are already at work. 

    These biases really come into play when "trying" to determine intelligence, because we first aren't truly able to compute, who does more with less, but we think we can. Our biases also will only want to recognize a correct answer, that our opinion agrees with. That may seem absurd, however, if you attempted to give a subject an IQ test and his answers were right in a sense as they appealed either to his idea of the truth or his opinion , though it is irrelevant to the truth directly, then you might decide he didn't give a correct answer, because you had something else in mind. When I first realized this, I decided never again, would anyone ever play any part in determining how intelligent I am. Only a fool lets the opinions of other make him what he shouldn't have become.

    Another thing that is probably not considered is the fact that, during what I am sure was quite a battery of tests, that were prepared for the GM and master level players who supposedly have been tested only to reveal average IQ, many of the chess players tested probably felt added pressure to perform, that other people wouldn't.

    I am sure most won't give them a pass or they'll try to compare it to the pressure of games, they are used to.Pressure we experience that we are used to, isn't the same as sudden unfamiliar stress.  Also I tend to think many of them said to themselves, "screw this, I'd rather be playing chess". Do we really know how hard any subjects that have ever been tested, among good chess players, really tried as hard as they could on IQ tests?

    I am trying to actually imagine Bobby Fischer's reaction to someone wanting to test him, because the scientific community doubted the intellect of the best chess players, or thought it to be perhaps ordinary. I am sure he would have reached some of the same conclusions I have.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #267

    nameno1had

    joeydvivre wrote:

    Has this thread morphed into "what is special about grandmasters?" or is the question still "is there a relationship between IQ and chess skill?" because the two questions have almost nothing to do with each other.  There are (I dunno) 1000 GM's in the world so a GM is like a 1 in every 7 million people outlier.  And from these outliers we are trying to learn what about a general relationship?

    Well it is obvious that not all chess players are intelligent, many of them show that in the forums without any special testing. On the other had, I guess the aforementioned biases that we have, also come into play when we epitomize the chess player.

    I guess the best subject to use, from my view point would be to take the best chess player, who seems to be able to out wit all of his opponents, whether fellow GM's or an ordinary bystander and use him/her to see what the results are in comparing IQ to chess prowess.

    It doesn't make much sense to take someone who doesn't appear to be intelligent by chess standards and then see if they are perhaps one of the smartest people on earth. Conventional wisdom would probably tell most of us, if they really are that intelligent, it would become manifest while the play chess.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #268

    zborg

    ParamedicPunk wrote:

    What's funny about this is there are so many aspects and fallacies in how people perceive "IQ".  There's coordination, interior design, logic, wisdom, theory, finite, conceptual, etc...I know a LOT of people that have poor social intelligence, but exceptional logical/yet very poor wisdom.



    Is the above some kind of metaphor for intelligent furniture??

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #269

    zborg

    joeydvivre wrote:

    Has this thread morphed into "what is special about grandmasters?" or is the question still "is there a relationship between IQ and chess skill?" because the two questions have almost nothing to do with each other.  There are (I dunno) 1000 GM's in the world so a GM is like a 1 in every 7 million people outlier.  And from these outliers we are trying to learn what about a general relationship?

    Another valiant effort by @Joey to "herd these cats" into some kind of sensible conceptual framework.

    Kinda like Rowdy Yates (Clint Eastwood) on Rawhide in the 1960s.

    Still, you have your work cut out for you.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #270

    nameno1had

    zborg wrote:
    ParamedicPunk wrote:

    What's funny about this is there are so many aspects and fallacies in how people perceive "IQ".  There's coordination, interior design, logic, wisdom, theory, finite, conceptual, etc...I know a LOT of people that have poor social intelligence, but exceptional logical/yet very poor wisdom.


    Let alone, a gaping hole in a lot of IQ tests is the extrapolation of words from several missing letters...that's wisdom, and regionalism being tested.  If one weren't exposed to such a word, it hardly is an indication of intelligence. Anyway. . .

    Is the above some kind of metaphor for intelligent furniture??

    I'll relate this back to my section on biases in a previous post because, I don't always perceive the proposed coordination when it comes to interior decorating. I'll agree to the shapes and colors jiving in certain ways but, what happens if you want to add or change one thing, that you find essential, and it doesn't match with that over priced "scheme" ?

    I think I'll continue to leave my decor in the user friendly coordinated style. It is so much more practical in terms of value and flexibility, for my few needs that will change, a few times over the years, as well as, accomodating all of my wife's continually, ever changing "wants".

    I am certainly happy about freedom of opinion...

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #271

    nameno1had

    ParamedicPunk wrote:
    nameno1had wrote:
    zborg wrote:
    ParamedicPunk wrote:

    What's funny about this is there are so many aspects and fallacies in how people perceive "IQ".  There's coordination, interior design, logic, wisdom, theory, finite, conceptual, etc...I know a LOT of people that have poor social intelligence, but exceptional logical/yet very poor wisdom.


    Let alone, a gaping hole in a lot of IQ tests is the extrapolation of words from several missing letters...that's wisdom, and regionalism being tested.  If one weren't exposed to such a word, it hardly is an indication of intelligence. Anyway. . .

    Is the above some kind of metaphor for intelligent furniture??

    I'll relate this back to my section on biases in a previous post because, I don't always perceive the proposed coordination when it comes to interior decorating. I'll agree to the shapes and colors jiving in certain ways but, what happens if you want to add or change one thing, that you find essential, and it doesn't match with that over priced "scheme" ?

    I think I'll continue to leave my decor in the user friendly coordinated style. It is so much more practical in terms of value and flexibility, for my few needs that will change, a few times over the years, as well as, accomodating all of my wife's continually, ever changing "wants".

    I am certainly happy about freedom of opinion...

    Interior design is spatial intelligence and how colors/shapes contrast and accent.  Thanks to HGTV for that!

    I see through their ploy. I'll stick to my sense of color and shape coordination I learned from my art teacher. I'll keep my money too. Too much HGTV can't be good for you...

    You'll end up broke, you won't recognize where you live and your wife still won't be satisfied...

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #272

    sapientdust

    joeydvivre wrote:

    Has this thread morphed into "what is special about grandmasters?" or is the question still "is there a relationship between IQ and chess skill?" because the two questions have almost nothing to do with each other.  There are (I dunno) 1000 GM's in the world so a GM is like a 1 in every 7 million people outlier.  And from these outliers we are trying to learn what about a general relationship?

    A GM would be a 1 in 7 million outlier if the entire planet had played as much chess as the GM, but most of them have never played chess, and those who have played chess have generally played far less.

    It would be interesting to know what percentage of people who have played at least 10,000 hours of chess within 10 or 15 years during their formative years are GMs. I would guess it's on the order of 1 in 100,000, or perhaps as many as 1 in 10,000, because there just aren't that many people who put that much serious effort into chess for such an extended period of time. That's just a wild guess though. Does anybody have any real data?

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #273

    nameno1had

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #274

    chessbacon

    my dad can beat up your dad.  I also have this equation where you feed in how many servings of green leafy vegetables you eat in a week and it spits out how much you earn in a year....discuss.  OH and btw I'm bats#it crazy.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #275

    Yorganciogluemre

    I have an iQ of 140 and I just can never win a chess game. everyone's mind is different and therefore I dont think there is a correlation between chess and ones IQ.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #276

    AlCzervik

    chessbacon wrote:

    my dad can beat up your dad.  I also have this equation where you feed in how many servings of green leafy vegetables you eat in a week and it spits out how much you earn in a year....discuss.  OH and btw I'm bats#it crazy.

    I love veggies.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #277

    Meadmaker

    nameno1had wrote:
    DavyWilliams wrote:

    Memory and IQ  go hand in hand.  I suspect strongly that Kasparov and Fischer had great memories.  There are some people that if you add multi talented at music, sports, many multi things, their IQs would be 200+.  I think, with all due respect, Fishcer and Kasparov, if you added sports and music and other things, might not be 200+ but their memory capabilties got them 190.   

    For me this makes sense. It also makes sense to me that, in order for GM's  to be great calculators, they have to have the ability to keep many things available in the their short term memory, to recall them to the forefront of their minds, as well as the positions they've studied for years in their long term memory.

    The studies I've read suggest that GMs tend to have extremely good long term memory, but that there is not a lot of correlation between Chess skill and short term memory.  To take one data point, Magnus Carlsen seems to have a phenomenal memory, and has since he was a small child.

    An interesting element about GM's memory:  Show a GM a board position from a Chess game, and then take it away and ask him to recreate the position from memory.  He'll do well, much better than the average person.   Show him a set of Chess pieces randomly arranged on a Chess board, take it away, and ask him to reproduce the position from memory.  He'll do no better than the average person.

    Human memory doesn't appear to be organized as a "flat file" sort of database, but somehow as interrelated patterns.  A GM, having learned the patterns, can remember the games much better. 

    For what it's worth, I've said that there is a weak correlation between IQ and Chess and that great Chess players don't have great IQs.  That's an oversimplification of the research I've read.  Great Chess players tend to have above average IQs, but above a certain level, the correlation weakens.  The greatest players might not have the highest performance on IQ tests.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #278

    Meadmaker

    joeydvivre wrote:

    Has this thread morphed into "what is special about grandmasters?" or is the question still "is there a relationship between IQ and chess skill?" because the two questions have almost nothing to do with each other.  There are (I dunno) 1000 GM's in the world so a GM is like a 1 in every 7 million people outlier.  And from these outliers we are trying to learn what about a general relationship?


    I'm guilty of saying "GM" when what I really mean is "good Chess player".

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #279

    zborg

    ParamedicPunk wrote:
    Interior design is spatial intelligence and how colors/shapes contrast and accent.  Thanks to HGTV for that!

    And roughly 8 percent of the male population are colorblind dunderheads, who fail badly at "smart furniture" and "interior design."  Myself included.  Laughing

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #280

    zborg

    joeydvivre wrote:

    What if you just don't give a crap about this?  My idea of interior design is "Big flat screen.  Easy access to the basement where I keep my stuff.  Big fridge for edible stuff.  Furniture that isn't a tragedy when it catches on fire."

    Laughing  I had a similar problem with my partner Donna's choice of granite countertops.  Allegedly they were black and gold, with flecks of silver and tan.  Once installed, all I saw in the countertop was "dark mud" colors.   Never again!

    Thankfully, I have some sway over the furniture in the basement level, where the Chessnuts gather.

    We use her old (flammable) lawn furniture, and it works just fine.


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