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Relationship between Chess rating and I.Q?


  • 22 months ago · Quote · #341

    bastira

    how about poker?

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #342

    nameno1had

    I would say intuiton, luck and control over ones outward appearance of thoughts and feelings is more important than intelligence in poker. One of the most important assets to have to give you the edge in poker is, no fear of losing. You can bluff indifinitely....and a bad hand and bet won't show outwardly...

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #343

    j_j_j_j_j

    Most likely there is a cutoff at some 110-130 IQ, where if you have more then this it will be of little significnce, but if you have less you will probably not reach the highest levels. The proof of this is, Kasparov had IQ 135, and can anyone name a rated 2400+ player with less then 120 IQ?

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #344

    ponz111

    In poker luck only is a factor in the short run. Intuition is what?

    In poker on the internet you cannot bluff via how you look.

    Very good math ability helps in poker.  Also, you must be able to

    memorize every card played that you can see.

    Also perserverance is very important and by that I mean being sharp on every hand for a long period of time.

    I used to win a lot of $ at online poker but then when my ability to stay very alert waned so did my winnings until I started only breaking even and then quit the game.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #345

    ron22314

    solitary practice is correlated with chess success!

    Does that make chess the solitary vice? 

    If I play chess too often daily will I go blind or grow hair on my palms?

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #346

    nameno1had

    ponz111 wrote:

    In poker luck only is a factor in the short run. Intuition is what?

    In poker on the internet you cannot bluff via how you look.

    Very good math ability helps in poker.  Also, you must be able to

    memorize every card played that you can see.

    Also perserverance is very important and by that I mean being sharp on every hand for a long period of time.

    I used to win a lot of $ at online poker but then when my ability to stay very alert waned so did my winnings until I started only breaking even and then quit the game.

    I was only referring to poker in person, I wouldn't waste my time playing online...I would trust an money exchanges, especially in any amount worth playing for...the lack of being able to study your opponent, in a sense makes it a different game from the game that was invented for which the need of a "poker face" arose...

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #347

    nameno1had

    j_j_j_j_j wrote:

    Most likely there is a cutoff at some 110-130 IQ, where if you have more then this it will be of little significnce, but if you have less you will probably not reach the highest levels. The proof of this is, Kasparov had IQ 135, and can anyone name a rated 2400+ player with less then 120 IQ?

    I think your statement is accurate. It takes intelligence to play intelligently, but it only takes you so far because of the huge need for memorization and experience. They simplify the need for the intelligence it would require of a less experienced person, in order to draw the right conclusions in a given situation.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #348

    nameno1had

    ponz111 wrote:

    In poker luck only is a factor in the short run. Intuition is what?

    In poker on the internet you cannot bluff via how you look.

    Very good math ability helps in poker.  Also, you must be able to

    memorize every card played that you can see.

    Also perserverance is very important and by that I mean being sharp on every hand for a long period of time.

    I used to win a lot of $ at online poker but then when my ability to stay very alert waned so did my winnings until I started only breaking even and then quit the game.

    BTW, if you think intuition is luck or chance, that is completely wrong. We can sit and debate it's origins, but I'll go with my intuition on this one, that it won't reach an answer that satisfies us both...

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #349

    BruceJuice

    Intuition comes from experience.

    At any rate whether IQ is correlated or not it's worthless if it isn't utilized correctly.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #350

    nameno1had

    BruceJuice wrote:

    Intuition comes from experience.

    At any rate whether IQ is correlated or not it's worthless if it isn't utilized correctly.

    I had my intuition warn me about many more serious things as a rather inexperienced and naive child...

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #351

    Kikkinass

    Hello everybody, I work for a advertising firm, and me and the IT director play on this site. He is by far smarter than me, but i'm way better than him at chess. With that said, I would think a person anyone for that matter, would great at what behooves them 

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #352

    zborg

    Well said Darrell.  Nice Avatar too.  Smile

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #353

    kiwi

    I believe I have already tackled a similar topic, http://blog.chess.com/kiwi_overtherainbow/the-invisible-gorilla-formula-to-success 

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #354

    Kikkinass

    Thanks Zborg

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #355

    uwinagain

    Blimey! you all sound like very clever people to me!

    For me I think it's more to do with the adrenalin rush of the fight;

    or struggle, if your me?? and enjoying it.

    Nothing to do with IQ..   I Think?  Smile

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #356

    now_and_zen

    It could also be argued that truly intelligent people don't waste their time on Chess.   Maybe it is possible that a high-functioning autistic person could show no other signs of worldly or practical intelligence, yet have mastery of chess.  

    Many intelligent people are lopsided in their intelligence - e.g. strong in some kinds of things at the expense of others.  So is that really genius?  The geniuses I've respected most were generally very good at many things, including humanistic endeavors and interpersonal relations.  But some people would consider the emotional imperfect realm of social interaction stupid.

    Intelligence doesn't instantly translate to chess wizardry.  A highly experienced chess player of a lower IQ should generally be able to trounce a genius that has little interest or exposure.  

    Really intelligent people are probably confident enough in themselves to not bother replying to a thread like this. :-)

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #357

    nameno1had

    Chess is only a sport if you play on a  board so large that you have to carry the pieces with great effort from square to square and have a time limit. I have seen a park where they do it, and there are a few others too. Here is one. In San Clemente California :

     

     
     
     

    S an Clemente, CaliforniaSan Clemente, California San Clemente, California

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #358

    netzach

    You are unfamiliar with mental-sporting contests then? So make assumption that all sport involves is physical-brawn??

    The mind (brain) is a physical organ like any other that may be exercised through sport.

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #359

    nameno1had

    netzach wrote:

    You unfamiliar with mental-sporting contests then? So make assumption that all sport involves is physical-brawn??

    What separates a game from the a sport is the physical aspect...shall we make sport of this ? lol

    In my mind there is a difference and I have to draw a line somewhere... certainly the terms can be used interchangably, but I think sport better describes a  more physical type of game, while a game is more mental...when they are good combinations of both, it isn't such a big deal to me...at least I am consistent...Cool

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #360

    netzach

    Well. We know what you think then. Have you considered the part the mind plays in your definition of sport? (physical-oomph) ie: Tennis or Boxing.


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