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Resigned Game Stats


  • 5 years ago · Quote · #1

    onosson

    With all the current discussions around the topic of resigning, I have a very different question on that subject.

    I just resigned a game in which I got off to a bad start, and I was curious about my resigned game statistics.  So, I went to look at my stats and discovered that there was no information on my resigned games anywhere! (or maybe I'm just not looking hard enough...)

    I wonder if anyone else would care to know anything about their resigned games - how many points they were down, difference in rating versus their opponent, total and percentage of resigned losses/wins, etc.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #2

    onosson

    I guess the answer to my question is: no one!

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #3

    BorgQueen

    I analyse every game I play, so once that's done, the game becomes "the past" and statistics aren't that important to me... I just do my best and learn what I can when I lose.

    I only resign when I know I'm beat and there is little or no hope of any kind of turn around.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #4

    nqi

    BorgQueen wrote:

    I only resign when I know I'm beat and there is little or no hope of any kind of turn around.


     As do I and I suspect most others. I don't think many people would find much use for such statistics. Having said that, it is an interesting suggestion...

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #5

    freezenyr

    it is an interesting suggestion; I agree.  I resign when I feel I have essentially no chance for a win or draw and I also study all games; especially my bad ones. 

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #6

    artfizz

    onosson wrote:

    I guess the answer to my question is: no one!


    If onosson asks a question - and no-one is around to hear it: did he really ask it in the first place?

    There have been previous enquiries about expanding the detail on game outcome i.e. breaking down draws into (draw by insufficient material; draw by stalemate; ...); losses broken down into (checkmate; resignation; out of time; illegal move; ...)

    The interesting data that might be derivable from resignation stats is a more concrete guideline about when it's probably time to consider resigning - based on such factors as: your own rating, the rating difference; the difference in material, the number of moves (i.e. the stage of the game). What such stats would fail to capture, however, is the positional state e.g. forced mate in 3.

    Another value in such stats is that it would explicitly label resigners as such. For players seeking opponents who are prepared to resign, this would be a tell-tale indicator.

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #7

    onosson

    nqi wrote:
    BorgQueen wrote:

    I only resign when I know I'm beat and there is little or no hope of any kind of turn around.


     As do I and I suspect most others. I don't think many people would find much use for such statistics.


    I can't be the only one who resigns after a bad blunder early in a game, can I?

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #8

    artfizz

    onosson wrote:
    nqi wrote:
    BorgQueen wrote:

    I only resign when I know I'm beat and there is little or no hope of any kind of turn around.


     As do I and I suspect most others. I don't think many people would find much use for such statistics.


    I can't be the only one who resigns after a bad blunder early in a game, can I?


    By you or by your opponent - or doesn't it make any difference?

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #9

    onosson

    Ha!  I don't think I've ever resigned after my opponent's blunder, but I guess there's always a first time for everything...

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #10

    artfizz

    onosson wrote:

    Ha!  I don't think I've ever resigned after my opponent's blunder, but I guess there's always a first time for everything...


    Roll up! Roll up! Play onosson and get free points! Make a blunder and he'll resign (maybe).

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #11

    nqi

    Sounds like a rating improvement plan...Laughing

    Edit: Crap! Unfornuatly not with my rating Embarassed Can I get a guarantee on that in case you don't onnoson? Now, for that King Grob Gambit research...

  • 5 years ago · Quote · #12

    Billium248

    I would love to see the stats page include the percentage breakdowns (of wins and losses) for "Game ended by: Checkmate, Resignation, Time Out."

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #13

    artfizz

    Billium248 wrote:

    I would love to see the stats page include the percentage breakdowns (of wins and losses) for "Game ended by: Checkmate, Resignation, Time Out."


    It would certainly sort out the actually-never-resign men from the say-you-never-resign boys.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #14

    Billium248

    artfizz wrote:
    Billium248 wrote:

    I would love to see the stats page include the percentage breakdowns (of wins and losses) for "Game ended by: Checkmate, Resignation, Time Out."


    It would certainly sort out the actually-never-resign men from the say-you-never-resign boys.


    LOL!!!  Laughing

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #15

    rigamagician

    An interesting statistic might be how much material the resigner was down at the time they resigned.  If on average, they were down a queen and 2 rooks, that might be a useful thing to know before agreeing to a game with them.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #16

    artfizz

    rigamagician wrote:

    An interesting statistic might be how much material the resigner was down at the time they resigned.  If on average, they were down a queen and 2 rooks, that might be a useful thing to know before agreeing to a game with them.

    Average downness (in terms of pieces) sounds difficult to calculate. (Also, the resigner would be UP some of the time on resigning.)

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #17

    rigamagician

    artfizz wrote:
    rigamagician wrote:

    An interesting statistic might be how much material the resigner was down at the time they resigned.  If on average, they were down a queen and 2 rooks, that might be a useful thing to know before agreeing to a game with them.

    Average downness (in terms of pieces) sounds difficult to calculate. (Also, the resigner would be UP some of the time on resigning.)

    Maybe they could calculate similar statistics for the winners of such games.  It would be interesting to play against a player who was usually material down when his opponents resign.


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