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Stop with solving tactics ??


  • 16 months ago · Quote · #1

    HaydenPanettiere

    Hello everyone !

    My Tactics rating is now 2507 here after I solve a huge chess Tactics everyday and I get tired of itLaughing  , I get only a less improve in blitz or bullet , why solving chess tactics ???????? it give me  no improve at all  !SurprisedUndecidedFrown

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #2

    baddogno

    Wow!  You are the living "exception to every rule".  Right now there is another thread going on how to improve in blitz and everyone is saying study tactics.  Bullet is for titled players and those who don't know any better, so I won't address that.  Do you go over your games and analyze why you're not winning?  Are you violating opening principles?  Do you launch attacks without sufficient development?  Are you having problems in the endgame?  There have to be reasons someone with your board vision and tactical awareness isn't better.  Maybe post a few games; someone is bound to have some suggestions.  This is fascinating to me...

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #3

    Scottrf

    I don't think just solving tactics puzzles helps blitz that much either. I got to 2400 and still drop pieces often. Just hard for me to check moves for safety without running out of time.

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #4

    Sunshiny

    There's nothing wrong with continuing tactics to keep it sharp. However, you probably should review your own games to find where your weaknesses are and focus on improving those areas.

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #5

    HaydenPanettiere

    I bought houdini 3 its my coach he  analyse my gamesLaughing and I bought a  membership  and this

    That's all I have noting more , I cannot buy everythingCry

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #6

    HaydenPanettiere

    Scottrf wrote:

    I don't think just solving tactics puzzles helps blitz that much either. I got to 2400 and still drop pieces often. Just hard for me to check moves for safety without running out of time.

    Yes same here I lost a real blitz tournament last , there where are very strong players they play so fast and make no mistakes I lost all my games !

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #7

    CrimsonKnight7

    Hmm, something isn't quite right with that. One thing however sticks out. I checked one of your games. You missed a simple mate your opponent had by moving a piece you knew that you couldn't move, so why did you move it?

    It had to be caused by you either running low on time, or hoping your opponent didn't see it, or you totally forgot about it, because of the mad time scramble perhaps, so which was it ?

    Also if you use an engine to solve TT puzzles, or cheat at them, you are right it won't help you very much, sure you will have a high rating in it, but you won't really improve very much in your tactical abilities. I don't know if you did that or not. Perhaps there are other possible reasons, such as the way each person remembers things differently to some degree.

    However someone that has a GM's understanding of tactics, should not constantly fall for one move mates.

    Perhaps you have tunnel vision. You can answer those questions yourself better than anyone else could. As to Tactical Trainer not being helpful is doubtful.

    Perhaps you don't have those patterns burned into memory yet, so how you could solve them on time is simply amazing, especially when you fall for a one move mate. Perhaps you would have lost on time anyway.

    My point is this, when you are playing a blitz game of 1 minute per game, your calculation ability is going to go down as well. Blitz games can help some people ( the key word is some, notice it does not say all people) with  memorizing openings, and short tactics. It will not guarantee that you will never miss a small mate, nor remember anything for that matter.

    There are no guarantees on anything. Perhaps tactics isn't the real issue, but knowledge in other areas, of your game. Good luck, and I hope this provides some food for thought, for you and others.

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #8

    Scottrf

    "However someone that has a GM's understanding of tactics, should not constantly fall for one move mates."

    If you think a 2500 rating on TT = a 2500 player's understanding of tactics, you're very wrong.

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #10

    UltraLaser

    Keep doing some tactics problems each day, but start looking at things such as strategy as well - strategy is often where games are won and lost, even in blitz. Once you have a better understanding of strategical points, you will have a better understanding of the game and will improve.

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #11

    HaydenPanettiere

    LOL I make a lot of auto moves in blitz and bullet I get always a big  time advanced , some told me bullet is about who make the fastest moves.

    Thankyou everyone for the great infoCoolCoolCool

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #12

    HaydenPanettiere

    CrimsonKnight7 wrote:

    Hmm, something isn't quite right with that. One thing however sticks out. I checked one of your games. You missed a simple mate your opponent had by moving a piece you knew that you couldn't move, so why did you move it?

    It had to be caused by you either running low on time, or hoping your opponent didn't see it, or you totally forgot about it, because of the mad time scramble perhaps, so which was it ?

    Also if you use an engine to solve TT puzzles, or cheat at them, you are right it won't help you very much, sure you will have a high rating in it, but you won't really improve very much in your tactical abilities. I don't know if you did that or not. Perhaps there are other possible reasons, such as the way each person remembers things differently to some degree.

    However someone that has a GM's understanding of tactics, should not constantly fall for one move mates.

    Perhaps you have tunnel vision. You can answer those questions yourself better than anyone else could. As to Tactical Trainer not being helpful is doubtful.

    Perhaps you don't have those patterns burned into memory yet, so how you could solve them on time is simply amazing, especially when you fall for a one move mate. Perhaps you would have lost on time anyway.

    My point is this, when you are playing a blitz game of 1 minute per game, your calculation ability is going to go down as well. Blitz games can help some people ( the key word is some, notice it does not say all people) with  memorizing openings, and short tactics. It will not guarantee that you will never miss a small mate, nor remember anything for that matter.

    There are no guarantees on anything. Perhaps tactics isn't the real issue, but knowledge in other areas, of your game. Good luck, and I hope this provides some food for thought, for you and others.

    solving tactics is easy ??? (only it cost time and is tired)  the tactics is already in every position , in my games not most great it and spend much  time for it  , and I not can remember 10000 tactics positionSealed

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #13

    EricFleet

    pfren wrote:

    Being good at solving tactics is a great thing.

    However, it's very different at OTB games. There:

    - Noone tells you that there is a tactic shot. You must sniff it yourself, which needs a good "killer instict".

     

    I would love to see a version of tactics trainer where at least two-thirds of the positions have no tactical shots. Instead you are already primed and ready to go.

    I recently went 3-1 in a G/30 tournament (way too fast for me). In my only loss, I was winning but could not convert my attack into a win, ended up losing two pieces and two pawns for a Rook and lost. Afterward, I realized  that I overlooked a simple tactical shot that would have easily won the game. But I was not looking for the shot.

    So, having a more real world version of tactics trainer would be a way to help develop the "sniff" ability.

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #14

    Khaos90

    If you're using Tactical Trainer you should not move any piece before you have seen why and i have a suspicion that the majority of the users is actually moving before they're really seeing what is going on. Instead of doing alot of puzzles you should slow down the pace and try to analyze more and mabye you will see the whole picture.
     
    This might seem to be a little bit backwards since you're trying to improve your blitz but in the long run i think you will benefit from it. Another thing you should be aware of is that if you overdo something you will most likely not improve. It's like when you're working out to complete a marathon and you train so hard that instead of increasing your stamina and endurance, it will get worse.
  • 16 months ago · Quote · #15

    waffllemaster

    EricFleet wrote:
    pfren wrote:

    Being good at solving tactics is a great thing.

    However, it's very different at OTB games. There:

    - Noone tells you that there is a tactic shot. You must sniff it yourself, which needs a good "killer instict".

     

    I would love to see a version of tactics trainer where at least two-thirds of the positions have no tactical shots. Instead you are already primed and ready to go.

    I recently went 3-1 in a G/30 tournament (way too fast for me). In my only loss, I was winning but could not convert my attack into a win, ended up losing two pieces and two pawns for a Rook and lost. Afterward, I realized  that I overlooked a simple tactical shot that would have easily won the game. But I was not looking for the shot.

    So, having a more real world version of tactics trainer would be a way to help develop the "sniff" ability.

    You may like the book "Practical Chess Exercises" where there is a good move to find, but only sometimes is it tactical.  The other times it's a positional move.  It never tells you which, it only gives the position.

    http://www.amazon.com/Practical-Chess-Exercises-Lessons-Strategy/dp/1587368013

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #16

    EricFleet

    Khaos90 wrote:
    If you're using Tactical Trainer you should not move any piece before you have seen why and i have a suspicion that the majority of the users is actually moving before they're really seeing what is going on. Instead of doing alot of puzzles you should slow down the pace and try to analyze more and mabye you will see the whole picture.
     
    This might seem to be a little bit backwards since you're trying to improve your blitz but in the long run i think you will benefit from it. Another thing you should be aware of is that if you overdo something you will most likely not improve. It's like when you're working out to complete a marathon and you train so hard that instead of increasing your stamina and endurance, it will get worse.

    Agreed. This is why I prefer chesstempo.com for tactics. I get a rating, but can take as long as I want to figure out the right move. I go through all the variations (or try to Smile) and replay them until I get it right in my mind. On chess.com I have to decide whether to play for ratings or accuracy.

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #17

    EricFleet

    waffllemaster wrote:
     

    You may like the book "Practical Chess Exercises" where there is a good move to find, but only sometimes is it tactical.  The other times it's a positional move.  It never tells you which, it only gives the position.

    http://www.amazon.com/Practical-Chess-Exercises-Lessons-Strategy/dp/1587368013

    Thank you for the recommendation. I may check this book out once I am through my backlog of other chess books :)

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #18

    CrimsonKnight7

    Perhaps I am wrong then. TT is more than just tactics however, true it is the main theme, but TT has other themes in it as well.

    And while you maybe correct that a 2500 rating in TT does not equate necessarily to a true GM's understanding, ( and my statement isn't totally correct) its definitely above normal from what a 1200, or even a 1600 rated player would have.

    Granted I am not sure how chess.com comes up with their rating system though. However, I have done some of the higher level ones ( In TT). Some were actually easier than the 1200-1500 ones. Regardless many come from expert, and master games, and require skill to solve, especially with the timer. I have been doing chess puzzles at least since 10, and I'm over 50 now.

    While I am not an expert, I do have a half way decent understanding of tactical and positional aspects of chess. TT has both elements in it, as well as not telling you what you are looking for while the clock is running.

    True you do know you are looking for some motiff however, but in the OTB games I played, I was constantly looking for similar things on every move also. Also others know about certain little tricks about if its a short amount of time, its something simple.

    Thats why you make the clock invisible, and you don't know how much time you have from one puzzle to the next, that way you can't tell whether its simple or not.

    Then you truly have no idea what you are looking for, and will just try to solve the puzzle. Thats what I do personally. Because its a personal goal of mine to improve. So why would I try to make it easier.

    You get out of something what you put in (so the saying goes).

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #19

    Ubik42

    Wow, here I thought I was an oddball with 1800ish tactics and 1200ish blitz.

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #20

    HaydenPanettiere

    [COMMENT DELETED]

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