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Thought process.


  • 20 months ago · Quote · #1

    Fazmaster

    Hi to all.

    I'm new here and I have rediscovered the game after a long hiatus. I stopped playing because I couldn't break the 1300 barrier. I am slightly better now but I still struggle in "seeing" a position after podering a few variations. I always seem to miss very obvious elements and it's bogging me down. Any suggestions? References to works on how a strong player goes about in his thought process to reach a decision as to what the best move in a given position to play?

    Cheers,

    Faz

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #2

    udinator

    wow, that's the exact same problem I have been having lately.

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #3

    knightwriter2000

    I would study tactics. This site has a great tactics trainer.  I know there are books, such as annotated games as well as some books like, "Think Like A Grandmaster, but I've never read those books. (I would like to) I'm sure someone here will be able to point you in the right direction for reference books, but I would definitely study tactics.

    Just my two cents. Have a great day!

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #4

    transpo

    Fazmaster wrote:

    Hi to all.

    I'm new here and I have rediscovered the game after a long hiatus. I stopped playing because I couldn't break the 1300 barrier. I am slightly better now but I still struggle in "seeing" a position after podering a few variations. I always seem to miss very obvious elements and it's bogging me down. Any suggestions? References to works on how a strong player goes about in his thought process to reach a decision as to what the best move in a given position to play?

    Cheers,

    Faz

    ______________________________________________________________________________________________

    Make a written list: Keep it with you

    I titled mine: Things I Must Do Before I Make A Move

    1. What is my opponent's threat(s)

    Eventually you will have referred to it so often you will have memorized it. And, consequently an unconscious thinking pattern (Thought Process).

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #5

    Casual_Joe

    This is my thought process for choosing a move:

     

    Get a feel for the tactical landscape.

    1.      Look at tactical possibilities (threats) that you have or could create.

    ·         Are there any unprotected pieces or pawns?

    ·         Can I put his king in check?

    ·         Can I pin/fork/skewer one of his pieces?

    ·         Can I gain a tempo and/or take the initiative?

    ·         What aggressive, harassing, disruptive, annoying moves can I make?

    2.      Look at tactical possibilities (threats) that my opponent has or could create.

     

    Get a feel for the positional landscape.

    3.      What are the imbalances?

    ·         Material

    ·         Space

    ·         Development.  Piece coordination.  Active vs. inactive pieces.

    ·         Superior minor piece.  Bishop vs. Knight, two bishops, bishops of opposite color.

    ·         Pawn structure.  Is there a pawn break?

    ·         Control of a key square or file.  Control of the center.

    ·         Initiative

    4.      What are you trying to achieve (positionally)?

    ·         What part of the board should I be playing on?  Can I play in the center?

    ·         Do I want to keep the pieces on, or trade them off?  (Stay in the middle game or head toward an end game?)  Do I want to trade pawns off or keep them on?

    ·         Am I utilizing all my pieces (and pawns) to their fullest potential?  What squares to they want to be on?

    5.      What is my opponent trying to achieve (positionally)?

     

    Combine tactical and positional considerations into a best move.

    6.      Are there tactics associated with achieving my positional goals and/or thwarting his positional goals?

    ·         How can I achieve my positional goals in the most effective way?

    7.      What are the candidate moves?

    8.      What is the best move (combine tactics and position)?

    ·         What wonderful thing does this move do for me?

    9.      Articulate your plan.

    10. What is his best response?

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #6

    TheGreatOogieBoogie

    I just got Heissman's Improving Chess Thinker in the mail yesterday, which is a really good read.  He says that many under 1600 (USCF scale) fail to do a positional evaulation and formulate plans.  Sometimes stopping their plan takes priority.  The exercises were pretty good, but my protocols resembled those higher than my rating (1600's Chess.com would equal about 1300-1450 USCF).  

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #7

    Benedictine

    Casual_Joe wrote:

    This is my thought process for choosing a move:

     

    Get a feel for the tactical landscape.

    1.      Look at tactical possibilities (threats) that you have or could create.

    ·         Are there any unprotected pieces or pawns?

    ·         Can I put his king in check?

    ·         Can I pin/fork/skewer one of his pieces?

    ·         Can I gain a tempo and/or take the initiative?

    ·         What aggressive, harassing, disruptive, annoying moves can I make?

    2.      Look at tactical possibilities (threats) that my opponent has or could create.

     

    Get a feel for the positional landscape.

    3.      What are the imbalances?

    ·         Material

    ·         Space

    ·         Development.  Piece coordination.  Active vs. inactive pieces.

    ·         Superior minor piece.  Bishop vs. Knight, two bishops, bishops of opposite color.

    ·         Pawn structure.  Is there a pawn break?

    ·         Control of a key square or file.  Control of the center.

    ·         Initiative

    4.      What are you trying to achieve (positionally)?

    ·         What part of the board should I be playing on?  Can I play in the center?

    ·         Do I want to keep the pieces on, or trade them off?  (Stay in the middle game or head toward an end game?)  Do I want to trade pawns off or keep them on?

    ·         Am I utilizing all my pieces (and pawns) to their fullest potential?  What squares to they want to be on?

    5.      What is my opponent trying to achieve (positionally)?

     

    Combine tactical and positional considerations into a best move.

    6.      Are there tactics associated with achieving my positional goals and/or thwarting his positional goals?

    ·         How can I achieve my positional goals in the most effective way?

    7.      What are the candidate moves?

    8.      What is the best move (combine tactics and position)?

    ·         What wonderful thing does this move do for me?

    9.      Articulate your plan.

    10. What is his best response?

    What, you go through that entire shopping list for every single move?

    Heisman talks about this a lot, have a look at his website on real chess vs hope chess..

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #8

    Casual_Joe

    I try to go through it every move (I play turn-based games, not fast time).  Once you get used to doing it you can do it pretty quickly.

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #9

    Fazmaster

    Casual_Joe wrote:

    I try to go through it every move (I play turn-based games, not fast time).  Once you get used to doing it you can do it pretty quickly.

    I like this a lot. I figure that the more you do it, a given position will make you weed out certain steps. I think this can be done quickly once you get used to what to look for. Thanks!


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