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  • 2 years ago · Quote · #41

    Estragon

    I can't listen to the ongoing live commentary, I am trying to do other things.  But Daniel King does a good round-up of each day's action when it's over.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #42

    DaBigOne

    In my opinion, I believe Aronian just lost a pawn with Ne7??.

    Is this true???

    I expect more from the 2nd best in the world... :)

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #43

    DaBigOne

    pfren wrote:

    Sure enough, Magnus isn't "the greatest ever". A handful of other players may claim that title (some not, as they have passed away).

    But the sheer quality of his play is phenomenal, in the whole history of chess. How can we say it- Capablanca on steroids with Kasparov fighting spirit, maybe?

    No, a positional computer. (a computer that can play well positionally)

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #44

    VULPES_VULPES

    Move 54

    Why not 54. ... Bxe6?

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #45

    trysts

    Estragon wrote:

    I can't listen to the ongoing live commentary, I am trying to do other things.  But Daniel King does a good round-up of each day's action when it's over.

    Do you have a link for the Daniel King round-up, Estragon?

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #46

    Elubas

    "Sure enough, Magnus isn't "the greatest ever". A handful of other players may claim that title (some not, as they have passed away).

    But the sheer quality of his play is phenomenal, in the whole history of chess. How can we say it- Capablanca on steroids with Kasparov fighting spirit, maybe?"

     

    This deserves another mentioning. His play is phenomenal indeed. He might not make as many tactical brilliancies as Kasparov, but he makes up for that with outstanding consistency and, what seems to me, an unmatched ability to win from equal positions!

    I mean, Fischer complained about how chess was played out, and yet Carlsen probably believes there is life in just about any position! He hardly even tries for an advantage out of the opening, and he can grind down super GMs nonetheless. 

    Frankly, I do think his chess is stronger than almost anyone throughout history, but maybe that statement is too bold. If he isn't now, I certainly think he will be.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #47

    sisu

    Let's make it happen!

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #48

    Uns0undSacrifice

    Fischer, Morphy, Kasparov, Capablanca would all like to have a word with you.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #49

    varelse1

    I merely state today what the rest of the world will know in a few years time. Accept it as you will.Innocent

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #50

    Timothy_P

    Carlsen!

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #51

    Estragon

    trysts wrote:
    Estragon wrote:

    I can't listen to the ongoing live commentary, I am trying to do other things.  But Daniel King does a good round-up of each day's action when it's over.

    Do you have a link for the Daniel King round-up, Estragon?

    Well, Chessbase embeds it every day on their report of the round. I'm guessing it originates on Playchess.  On the official site IM Andrew Martin does a video on Game of the DAy for each round.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #52

    Estragon

    Very hot start for Carlsen with 3 wins and a draw in the first four games, including a win against Aronian, who has now fallen back to 2807 in Live Ratings, a full 50 points behind Carlsen but still #2.  Kramnik's good start has him back over 2800 again, too, so we again have three active players over 2800.

    Carlsen is clearly the world's strongest today, but that doesn't necessarily make him "the greatest player of all time."  He has to establish a dominance over chess over time to claim that mythical title.  He hasn't even won the championship yet, much less held it against top competition.  He hasn't come close to topping Tal's unbeaten streaks or Fischer or Kasparov's winning streaks. 

     

    But his positional understanding is on a par with the greatest, Capablanca, Smyslov, and Karpov, and if anything he has demonstrated the advantage of playing out "even" positions, that they are by no means necessarily drawn and can still be fertile ground for original ideas.

    So I fully expect Carlsen to be "the greatest" before his career is near over, but he hasn't achieved that just yet.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #53

    sisu

    Let's make it happen!

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #54

    varelse1

    And it is official. Carlsen won the London Chess Classic 2012, with a score of +5 =3 -0.

    And, come January 1st, 2013, FIDE will recognize him as the highest rated shess player in the world, ever!!!

    And he only just turned 22!! Who can say what we can expect from him in the future??

    If you're reading this Magnus, Congratulations!!!!!!!!!

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #55

    Elubas

    People think that just because ratings are not an absolute measure, that Carlsen has to be 2900 or something to prove he has become better than Kasparov. Carlsen's gap is not as large as Kasparov's was, but in this day and age a gap is more difficult to produce most likely because it's so hard to surprise opponents out of the opening. So a 50 point gap now might be similar to a 80-100 point gap 15 years ago. Or maybe not; in any case I think it's hard to say Carlsen's achievement isn't simply unbelievable, something nobody at all has been able to do since Kasparov.

    Carlsen is basically the king of chess at this point.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #56

    MJ4H

    Since ratings are not absolute values, there is no rating accomplishment one can acheive to prove they have become better than Kasparov.  Even the creation of a larger relative gap has way too many variables to be considered an accurate gauge.  Carlsen's "acheivement" is merely a numeric curiosity, and not as much to do with inherent quality of the chess as most seem to think.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #57

    varelse1

    Is Carlsen better than Kasparov? That may be debatable.

    Is Carlsen at 22 better than Kasparov at 22? Without a doubt.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #58

    Elubas

    Indeed. Also it's worth pointing out that nobody was even close to doing what Kasparov did with the ratings once he left; he left a big hole in the world of professional chess, a clear number one quitting while he was ahead. Carlsen has filled that hole.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #59

    konhidras

    Just wait till Chess Network faces Carlsen. just you guys wait.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #60

    varelse1

    Elubas wrote:

    Indeed. Also it's worth pointing out that nobody was even close to doing what Kasparov did with the ratings once he left; he left a big hole in the world of professional chess, a clear number one quitting while he was ahead. Carlsen has filled that hole.

    Now that I think about it, I could name ONE other player who quit like that......

    Was back in the 70's, I believe.......

    Tongue Out


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