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Tracking moves on paper while playing...


  • 4 years ago · Quote · #21

    RookedOnChess

    Estragon wrote:

    But using notes, diagrams, or analysis sets should get you immediately forfeited.  A clear and direct violation of the rules.  In competition, it's just you, the board, the clock, and the scoresheet.


     LOL Estragon---that's why I will NEVER be competing! lol I can barely play!

    I didn't know it was required for the players to record their moves though, but it definitely makes sense. Thanks for all that great info :)

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #22

    SimonSeirup

    RookedOnChess wrote:
    Estragon wrote:

    But using notes, diagrams, or analysis sets should get you immediately forfeited.  A clear and direct violation of the rules.  In competition, it's just you, the board, the clock, and the scoresheet.


     LOL Estragon---that's why I will NEVER be competing! lol I can barely play!

    I didn't know it was required for the players to record their moves though, but it definitely makes sense. Thanks for all that great info :)


    I think you will be happy to read FIDE's Laws of Chess :)

    http://www.fide.com/component/handbook/?id=124&view=article

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #23

    Dragec

    RookedOnChess wrote:


    I didn't know it was required for the players to record their moves though, but it definitely makes sense. Thanks for all that great info :)


    Just think how many great games would have never reached us, hadn't it be for the players recording their moves Cool

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #24

    RookedOnChess

    Simon, thanks for the link, and Dragec, you're right! You know, I can't remember which game I looked up on some site; it was a Fischer game, a famous game. I was able to watch it play out and even with my novice knowledge of chess, I could see the genius behind his play. And for sure, my boyfriend, Mark, is a total FIEND for downloading any and every PGN he can get his hand on!

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #25

    theoreticalboy

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #26

    RookedOnChess


    Another great link! Thank you! :) I didn't know they made these!

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #27

    Estragon

    RookedOnChess wrote:

    Another great link! Thank you! :) I didn't know they made these!


     

    I use the same ones for OTB tournament games - different color cover and I got them through vendors at tournaments or from USCF, one or the other, but the layout is identical.

    I've also seen some out in recent years which are hardbound books, which some players are using, but I bet they cost a lot more.  (Most tournaments will supply simple scoresheets, often two-part if they ask games be turned in, but once you've played in a few events the loose ones get hard to keep track of).

    The latest techno thing is the MonRoi device, an electronic scorekeeper now legal for tournaments.  Pretty pricey, though, at about $350 each, but they can keep track of all your games and make you look very trendy at a tournament.

    However I do input my tournament games into a database when I get home, not that I play much these days.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #28

    ColdCoffee

    http://www.wholesalechess.com/shop/chess_supplies/chess_scorebooks

    Cheaper here, even after shipping (at least while they are on sale). They have hardcover books too like those mentioned before. I have ordered through this company and was very happy with their service.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #29

    RookedOnChess

    It's funny, ColdCoffee---I mentioned this to Mark today, thinking he wasn't aware of it, but he was and told me they sold them on wholesalechess.com. I bet these are the same ones! :)

    And the electronic one would make sense if you actually do tournaments. That must've been exciting, Estragon :)

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #30

    NickYoung5

    PrawnEatsPrawn wrote:

    If you are talking about over-the-board play, then note-taking is expressly forbidden, to the extent that one may not even write down one's intended next move, before-hand. The score-sheet records the moves that have been played, not thoughts, analysis and intentions.

    Note-taking in correspondence chess is, of course, fine and usual. On this site pencil and paper are unnecessary... there's a place to type notes on the game page.


    Actually there's a note on the board in my club which says that USCF allows you to write down your intended move before you play it if you are recording the game with pen and paper. However, if you're recording the game on one of those newfangled electronic things (Monroi ?) you may may not.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #31

    PrawnEatsPrawn

    NickYoung5 wrote:
    PrawnEatsPrawn wrote:

    If you are talking about over-the-board play, then note-taking is expressly forbidden, to the extent that one may not even write down one's intended next move, before-hand. The score-sheet records the moves that have been played, not thoughts, analysis and intentions.

    Note-taking in correspondence chess is, of course, fine and usual. On this site pencil and paper are unnecessary... there's a place to type notes on the game page.


    Actually there's a note on the board in my club which says that USCF allows you to write down your intended move before you play it if you are recording the game with pen and paper. However, if you're recording the game on one of those newfangled electronic things (Monroi ?) you may may not.


    I know nothing of USCF, the rules I was referring to are FIDE.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #32

    Estragon

    NickYoung5 wrote:
    PrawnEatsPrawn wrote:

    If you are talking about over-the-board play, then note-taking is expressly forbidden, to the extent that one may not even write down one's intended next move, before-hand. The score-sheet records the moves that have been played, not thoughts, analysis and intentions.

    Note-taking in correspondence chess is, of course, fine and usual. On this site pencil and paper are unnecessary... there's a place to type notes on the game page.


    Actually there's a note on the board in my club which says that USCF allows you to write down your intended move before you play it if you are recording the game with pen and paper. However, if you're recording the game on one of those newfangled electronic things (Monroi ?) you may may not.


     

    No, this has been changed after FIDE changed the Laws of Chess to prohibit it, although USCF still allows it as a special rule for events (which must be announced in advance).  There was never any real reason to allow it - other than the fact one World Champion (Petrosian) was in the habit of doing it.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #33

    Estragon

    RookedOnChess wrote:

    It's funny, ColdCoffee---I mentioned this to Mark today, thinking he wasn't aware of it, but he was and told me they sold them on wholesalechess.com. I bet these are the same ones! :)

    And the electronic one would make sense if you actually do tournaments. That must've been exciting, Estragon :)


     

    Tournament play is a blast, and there are sections for all levels in many or most events, so you should try it.  If you are in the NYC area, that is the most active region in the USA.  There are big tournaments with large prize funds, weekend and one-day events, and even club-sponsored rapid tournaments which are played in a single evening.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #34

    LegoPirateSenior

    Estragon wrote:
    NickYoung5 wrote:

    Actually there's a note on the board in my club which says that USCF allows you to write down your intended move before you play it if you are recording the game with pen and paper. However, if you're recording the game on one of those newfangled electronic things (Monroi ?) you may may not.


    No, this has been changed after FIDE changed the Laws of Chess to prohibit it, although USCF still allows it as a special rule for events (which must be announced in advance).  There was never any real reason to allow it - other than the fact one World Champion (Petrosian) was in the habit of doing it.


    A minor nitpick: the link you posted disagrees with the text I highlighted in red:

    "15A. (Variation I) Paper scoresheet variation.

    The player using a paper scoresheet may first make the move, and then write it on the scoresheet, or vice versa. This variation does not need to be advertised in advance."

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #35

    Estragon

    LegoPirateSenior wrote:
    Estragon wrote:
    NickYoung5 wrote:

    Actually there's a note on the board in my club which says that USCF allows you to write down your intended move before you play it if you are recording the game with pen and paper. However, if you're recording the game on one of those newfangled electronic things (Monroi ?) you may may not.


    No, this has been changed after FIDE changed the Laws of Chess to prohibit it, although USCF still allows it as a special rule for events (which must be announced in advance).  There was never any real reason to allow it - other than the fact one World Champion (Petrosian) was in the habit of doing it.


    A minor nitpick: the link you posted disagrees with the text I highlighted in red:

    "15A. (Variation I) Paper scoresheet variation.

    The player using a paper scoresheet may first make the move, and then write it on the scoresheet, or vice versa. This variation does not need to be advertised in advance."


    It doesn't need to be advertised, just announced, which can be at the site before play commences in the first round:

    Method of keeping score (15A). In order to comply with FIDE laws and with the advent of electronic scoring devices, 15A was modified to require that the move be made prior to recording as the standard. If an event allows recording prior to the actual move on the board warnings are given regarding the use of that recording as note taking or as a memory aid (20B and C). (Aug 2006, modified Aug 2007)

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #36

    RookedOnChess

    Estragon wrote:
    RookedOnChess wrote:

    It's funny, ColdCoffee---I mentioned this to Mark today, thinking he wasn't aware of it, but he was and told me they sold them on wholesalechess.com. I bet these are the same ones! :)

    And the electronic one would make sense if you actually do tournaments. That must've been exciting, Estragon :)


     

    Tournament play is a blast, and there are sections for all levels in many or most events, so you should try it.  If you are in the NYC area, that is the most active region in the USA.  There are big tournaments with large prize funds, weekend and one-day events, and even club-sponsored rapid tournaments which are played in a single evening.


     Estragon, I would have absolutely no interest in participating in that kind of competition lol Trust me, I'm not capable of truly challenging play---only rarely can I play somewhat "OK". Of course, my boyfriend would probably enjoy it if he could ever get himself to do that!

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #37

    ChessMarkstheSpot

    Well, if I ever do bother joining the USCF, maybe one day I'll get the courage to do something like that LOL.  I used to write all my moves down for the CM games until I figured out how to save paper LOL

       -Mark

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #38

    jhb701

    there is an exception to writing moves down before making the move when you're claiming a draw or an adjournment.

    8.1

    . . . .

    It is forbidden to write the moves in advance, unless the player is claiming a draw according to Article 9.2, or 9.3 or adjourning a game according to the Guidelines of Adjourned Games point 1.a.

  • 4 years ago · Quote · #39

    karinokarino

    i think it wastes time on the clock. if i were you, i wouldnt dawdle like that.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #40

    BobeeFissure

    Rooked, there is an analyse board availabe while you play on chess.com.  Look at the lower right corner of your display.  You can move your pieces around just like in the game. Then write them down and play them in the real game.


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