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Unusual openings


  • 10 months ago · Quote · #1

    Nireida

    When you use the same openings, and rarely deviate from them, you get very familiar with the positions that arise from them... but I have a theory that that leaves you vulnerable to other kinds of positions! I'm guilty of choosing solid openings and sticking with them, and I'd like to find other people who are willing to play some games against me... under the condition that both of us seek to play openings as uncomfortable to us as possible (but not deliberately losing, of course.)

    Any ratings are welcome (I like playing just about anyone!) and while I do prefer Live chess 5 | 0, I'm willing to try Online as well! Unrated or rated is also fine, and we can discuss which openings we want to try. Sound fun?

    You might be wondering why I'm not just doing this idea in Live Blitz automatically... my answer is that I like doing this kind of thing against people who I regularly play with, and not just a randomly selected person out of 14,000 people online!

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #2

    peranto

    Problem with that is you wont get the same variety of openings, moves, theories etc.. But if you dont care about improving your overall game, and just want to practice quite limited and fixed positions then I wish you luck.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #3

    Nireida

    peranto wrote:

    Problem with that is you wont get the same variety of openings, moves, theories etc.. But if you dont care about improving your overall game, and just want to practice quite limited and fixed positions then I wish you luck.

    I actually disagree that I wouldn't get the same variety of openings in this experiment. There's plenty of openings that I'm not familiar with that aren't "limited and fixed."

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #4

    TheGreatOogieBoogie

    1.Nc3 and 1.b3 are great underrated openings.  The mainline 1.Nc3 has a variation where black has space and a pawn wedge, but creates so many weaknesses handing white a development advantage:



  • 10 months ago · Quote · #5

    Nireida

    Indeed! 1. e4 g5 is playable too, I've heard.

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #6

    RomyGer

    For me this is a strange subject in every respect, and I join peranto, post 2, you think you can practise quite limited fixed openings, but after a few moves you are out of your own wish-list, as the opponent does not know your ideas ( and that is good ).

    I copy and confirm your first line : yes, I use the same openings and rarely ( almost never ) deviate from them, and I get very familiar with the positions that arise from them.

    So : improve your overall game ( see post 2 ) and I wish you luck !

    So does my opponent in many cases, because he played half of these moves.

    But : that does NOT leave me vulnerable, to the contrary, it gives me splendid middle games in which I can follow the lines of the opening through the game towards the endgame.

    So why not continue what you are doing : 1) I doubt you find such willing opponents, and 2) you say it yourself : " I agree that I would get the  same variety of openings "

    How can someone play " an uncomfortable  opening " ?  His repertoire has themes that probably deviate from what you should want him to play, and I think the two repertoires will not match as you should wish.

    About "regular" opponents : we had one for years in a chess club, who also wanted to practise certain lines, he would discuss moves and take back as we together found a better one, and guess : all games played with such discussions ended in a draw...

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #7

    peranto

    Well, maybe that is why we differ in rating..

    The reason playing many openings is generally a good thing, is that you will become exposed to a larger variety of strategical and tactical ideas and patterns.. You might think theres still an infinite amount of moves after 1e4 e5 but you are already limiting yourself very much in the type of games you can get. By playing such moves as 1. g3, 1.b3, 1.f4 or 1.c4 you get completely different setups and ideas. 

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #8

    TheGreatOogieBoogie

    Right on!  With 1.f4 (the worst among the standards, but still quite playable, especially the Bird Wing Gambit, though 1...c5 is rare against the Bird) 1...g6 2.h4? grossly weakens the kingside, but 1.Nc3,g6 2.h4!  immediately puts to question black's premature fianchetto.  Position may be equal, perhaps unclear after 2.h4, but it should lead to interesting play.  If black tries getting smart with double fianchettos then:



  • 10 months ago · Quote · #9

    Snowyqueen

    Unusual openings that are based on sound fundamental principles are great.

    What I see a lot of are people who play unusual openings just for the sake of being different. And that's not so great - because whatever advantage you gain from familiarity is often undone by the practical difficulties you set yourself on the board. 

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #10

    LongIslandMark

    Is the use of "unusual" openings more common in Blitz and Bullet? I might see the advantage there if you have practise with the unusual opening where your opponent does not. Perhaps also a bit in longer live games, but little to no advantage in CC games?

  • 10 months ago · Quote · #11

    Nireida

    LongIslandMark wrote:

    Is the use of "unusual" openings more common in Blitz and Bullet? I might see the advantage there if you have practise with the unusual opening where your opponent does not. Perhaps also a bit in longer live games, but little to no advantage in CC games?

    I don't know, man. It seems 95% of the time I'm either facing 1.e4 or 1.d4 in Live Chess... which is partly what led to this forum post.


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