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What is your chess thought process??


  • 4 months ago · Quote · #1

    Shadow_Bishop

    How do u think before each move?

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #3

    manspider29

    how much money will it take to bribe this guy. . .

    hey, I swear you stole that from me @chesskingdreamer

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #4

    Raja_Kentut

    What's for lunch?

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #5

    manspider29

    hahaha thats a good one

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #6

    TheGreatOogieBoogie

    Okay, I do an assessment based on my chess knowledge and understanding then judging from the imbalances and appropriate candidate moves.  I then scan for checks, captures, and threats to see if there's something critical my opponent could do that I need to parry.  I try formulating a plan that drives the calculation.  An example thought process could go:

    "Position has mutual isolated d-pawns and I have the bishop against a knight.  Usually such a structure favors the side with the knight so that is one plus in my favor.  I'd really like to get the king over to c4 and raid the queenside but his defense easily holds.  Is g4-h4 with Rh1 a feasible plan provoking weaknesses on the kingside?  Any potential source of counterplay he has?  Yeah ...Rc2 looks nasty, Nc5 should blunt that, but this gives him time to reconcile a defense.  Have to utilize do not hurry but be careful not a abuse it..."

     

    Or, "I have the two bishops for his rook, so a plus for me as far as pieces go.  The side with the single rook usually doesn't want to trade it off.  Position is unclear, bishops contain pawn chains nicely but then again his three extra pawns tip the overall material balance in his favor even though I have two bishops and a rook against two rooks.  My bishops point to his kingside so if I could activate my rook to h8 and play ...Kg7 ...h5 then ...Rh8 attacking white he'll need to make some concessions.  Overall I'm behind in material so try attacking the king as my bishops already point there and he may need to give up some pawns to ease his defensive burden." 

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #7

    sammynouri

    I have no idea. I just calculate moves that look good. I know thats not a good thing, but its 10 min chess. Maybe if I can get my thinking a bit faster. If there are no tactics that would mean I would try to make my opponents pieces worse, or simply improve my own pieces.

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #8

    Grumly06

    My ideal thought process:

    1/ What is this move my opponent just played ? What is the idea ? Is there a threat ? If yes, how can I annihilate it ? Or do I have an attack stronger than his threat maybe ?

    2/ Knowing this, what are my possibilities ? Is there a tactical shot starting with a capture or a check that wins on the spot ? Else, where would I like to put my pieces ? Is there a tactical sequence to reach that ?

     

    The common mistake is to do 2/ before 1/. It leads to that kind of games "Oh I'm better, I'm winning, I'm winning, I just have to do this to blow him up.............Shit I'am checkmated"

    At least it was long a problem for me (and still is, a little bit)

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #9

    John_Stork

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #10

    Luvrug

    Eggs, Milk, Coffee, Bacon, Magazine, Ciggarettes........

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #11

    TheGreatOogieBoogie

    It's important to incorporate into your thought process stuff you read in books too.  For example in Think Like a Grandmaster someone recommended to ask yourself what you can get away with leaving en prise. 

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #12

    varelse1

    My thought process in a typical game:

    (Sit down at board) Look at this noob! This will be quick!

    (Start game.) Use this opening, I bet the doesn't even know it!

    What kind of a move is that?! Does this guy even know what he's doing???

    Lets see what he does about this little move.....

    Oh, yeah...nevermind.

    (Resign the game , sign the scoresheets.) That guy was good!

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #13

    waffllemaster

    Different types of positions have different thought processes.  The better / more experienced / more studied you are the more you use long term memory.  The more confused you are the more you have to calculate (but no matter how confused you are, you're always doing better than the computer which has to calculate millions of moves ;)

    In almost every position you'll do things like blunder check and look for undefended pieces.  Also in every position you're usually trying to maximize mobility / influence of your pieces in comparison to theirs. 

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #14

    TheGreatOogieBoogie

    waffllemaster wrote:

    Different types of positions have different thought processes.  The better / more experienced / more studied you are the more you use long term memory.  The more confused you are the more you have to calculate (but no matter how confused you are, you're always doing better than the computer which has to calculate millions of moves ;)

    In almost every position you'll do things like blunder check and look for undefended pieces.  Also in every position you're usually trying to maximize mobility / influence of your pieces in comparison to theirs. 

    Agree with this post.  I'll also add that in the endgame you have to have a completely different mind and value set.  For example in the middlegame it's usually better to capture towards the center whereas in the endgame it's usually better capturing away from the center, especially with a + b pawns vs. b + c for an outside passer.  A bishop's power also rises in an endgame especially with pawns on both sides, but even here there are exceptions (mutual isolated d-pawns, closed position, pawn on one side, etc.)


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