Upgrade to Chess.com Premium!

what should be the thinking algorithm while playing game of chess?(stepwise)


  • 24 months ago · Quote · #1

    abdulmajidsayem1

    many ppl play offence defence type of chess which is not recommended.

  • 24 months ago · Quote · #2

    cyberdynsystemsmodel

    1)king safety

    2)evaluating position

    3)looking for tactics

    if 3 is not there then bypass to stratigy

    make move

    stop

  • 24 months ago · Quote · #3

    abdulmajidsayem1

    thanks buddy

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #4

    cyberdynsystemsmodel

    hmmm any views frm higher rated players plz share ur views as it is a gud question

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #5

    KuzmickiMarek

    Capture center. Each move should be helpfull in that or defend opponent's threats.

    After that capture opponent's king.

    Why there is no algoritm in my answer?

    Because chess players created thousends of books on topic and did not get perfect alghoritm. So, you think just few words is enough...

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #6

    Kingpatzer

    There is no perfect algorithm. However, every move, every good chess player aspires to do at least the following in some order:

    1) identify opponent's threats

    2) identify own threats

    3) identify candidate moves that counter 1 and maximize 2

    4) calculate out the candidate moves to a logical stopping point

    5) choose a candidate move based on those calculations

    6) double check the candidate move for safety before making it

     

    There is no perfect order to do these steps in, though there is a general logical flow. Moreover, each step has multiple sub-steps that can be combined in differing ways. For example, some people will identify a threat, see a counter, start calculating, find a couple of good moves, calculate some more, spot a new threat as a result of calculating, identify a new counter calculate a new move, skip back to a previous calcuation without finishing one, skip back after double checking something, etc., etc., etc.,

    To some extent, one can't entirely control the process because you can't make yourself have insight into a position. That just happens when it happens. You can have spent 20 minutes getting to step 6 and just before your hand touches a piece you spot a threat you missed before and you're back at hte beginning. 

    And to some extent, you don't want to be too rigid, creativity is inherently messy, you have to guide your thoughts without presumming to control them.  

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #7

    abdulmajidsayem1

    thanks friends fr some lovely tips

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #8

    abdulmajidsayem1

    Kingpatzer wrote:

    There is no perfect algorithm. However, every move, every good chess player aspires to do at least the following in some order:

    1) identify opponent's threats

    2) identify own threats

    3) identify candidate moves that counter 1 and maximize 2

    4) calculate out the candidate moves to a logical stopping point

    5) choose a candidate move based on those calculations

    6) double check the candidate move for safety before making it

     

    There is no perfect order to do these steps in, though there is a general logical flow. Moreover, each step has multiple sub-steps that can be combined in differing ways. For example, some people will identify a threat, see a counter, start calculating, find a couple of good moves, calculate some more, spot a new threat as a result of calculating, identify a new counter calculate a new move, skip back to a previous calcuation without finishing one, skip back after double checking something, etc., etc., etc.,

    To some extent, one can't entirely control the process because you can't make yourself have insight into a position. That just happens when it happens. You can have spent 20 minutes getting to step 6 and just before your hand touches a piece you spot a threat you missed before and you're back at hte beginning. 

    And to some extent, you don't want to be too rigid, creativity is inherently messy, you have to guide your thoughts without presumming to control them.  


    tnx buddy gud advice

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #9

    bobbyDK

    a step should also be each time to consider as well why did the opponent move as he did, and what squares did he control before and after the move.


Back to Top

Post your reply: