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What should I study?


  • 15 months ago · Quote · #1

    manspider29

    I need to get better, but I don't know what to study!

    What is a good opening repitoire that I should learn?

    What do I need to focus on in the middle game?

    Can you suggest some puzzles to help with the end game?

    Please, it would be a lot of help everyone.

    Thanks!

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #2

    pdve

    manspider29 wrote:

    I need to get better, but I don't know what to study!

    What is a good opening repitoire that I should learn?

    What do I need to focus on in the middle game?

    Can you suggest some puzzles to help with the end game?

    Please, it would be a lot of help everyone.

    Thanks!

    A good opening repertoire .. maybe Giuoco Piano, Ruy Lopex, Open Sicilian, etc.. these are the more common ones but when I started I tried to play the more aggressive lines like king's gambit etc.. or responding to 1.d4 with 1..e5 etc.. because I wanted to learn faster

    What do I need to focus on in the middlegame:

    Piece activity

    Puzzles ..

    something from fred reinfeld is good.

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #3

    BhomasTrown

    take a look at the multiple concurrent close range/distant range, short term/ long term inter-relationships of the 32 pieces on the 64 squares, keeping an eye on the dynamic and static factors of the position, and relative fluctuating piece values with every move. :-) 

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #4

    manspider29

    thanks

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #5

    ronyfitz

    thanks....useful

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #6

    jambyvedar

    manspider29 wrote:

    I need to get better, but I don't know what to study!

    What is a good opening repitoire that I should learn?

    What do I need to focus on in the middle game?

    Can you suggest some puzzles to help with the end game?

    Please, it would be a lot of help everyone.

    Thanks!

    The 3 things you need to study to improve your games are strategy,tactics and endgame. For your level, I suggest you try Winning Chess Strategy by Seirawan, Chess Tactics for Champion by Polgar and Winning Chess Endings by Seirawan.

    Study well these books, and your game will improve. Don't play bullet chess, it will not improve your game. Skip blitz(at the mean time) and play longer games instead(maybe 25 minutes games).

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #7

    manspider29

    Thanks everyone, but could people mention general things rather than books, books can get very expensive! Laughing

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #8

    ivandh

    Theoretical physics

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #9

    manspider29

    ivandh wrote:

    Theoretical physics

    hahaha i mean in chess

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #10

    Estragon

    The first step in improving is figuring out your weaknesses and working on them, starting with the most serious.  If you go to the doctor with a bleeding wound and an itchy rash, he stops the bleeding first and gives you a prescription ointment later.

    I strongly suspect you do NOT lose most of your games due to not keeping up with the latest Grandmaster innovations in the Ruy Lopez.  I bet instead you lose most games because you don't see a simple tactic coming, and overlook the threat.  This causes you to lose a piece, or your Queen, or get checkmated.

    Am I warm?

     

    If so, you need to work on tactics, the simple move combinations that are the basic tools of playing chess.  Playing slower games and reviewing them for your mistakes is one good method.  Just playing helps, even, it takes experience to become a good player anyway.  Also Tactics Trainer here, and puzzles, and playing over games by good players can help, too.

    Until you can get through most games without losing any pieces to simple tactics of one or two moves, the only opening study you need is to play by the basic principles on this page.  For endgames, you should learn to checkmate with King + Queen, K+R, and K+2B, and the basic K+P v K endings.

    It's a pain to lose games, but part of improving is making mistakes - just be sure to try to correct them.  AND have fun while you work on improving, it is a game after all.

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #11

    manspider29

    Estragon wrote:

    The first step in improving is figuring out your weaknesses and working on them, starting with the most serious.  If you go to the doctor with a bleeding wound and an itchy rash, he stops the bleeding first and gives you a prescription ointment later.

    I strongly suspect you do NOT lose most of your games due to not keeping up with the latest Grandmaster innovations in the Ruy Lopez.  I bet instead you lose most games because you don't see a simple tactic coming, and overlook the threat.  This causes you to lose a piece, or your Queen, or get checkmated.

    Am I warm?

     

    If so, you need to work on tactics, the simple move combinations that are the basic tools of playing chess.  Playing slower games and reviewing them for your mistakes is one good method.  Just playing helps, even, it takes experience to become a good player anyway.  Also Tactics Trainer here, and puzzles, and playing over games by good players can help, too.

    Until you can get through most games without losing any pieces to simple tactics of one or two moves, the only opening study you need is to play by the basic principles on this page.  For endgames, you should learn to checkmate with King + Queen, K+R, and K+2B, and the basic K+P v K endings.

    It's a pain to lose games, but part of improving is making mistakes - just be sure to try to correct them.  AND have fun while you work on improving, it is a game after all.

    thanks, and yes, you are correct

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #12

    JM3000

    I recomend you this books:

    Tactics: Learn Chess Tactics (John Nunn),  Chess tactics for champions (Susan Polgar)

    Strategy: The Amateur's Mind (Jeremy Silman), How to Reasses your chess (Jeremy Silman)

    Endgames: Starting Out: Pawns Endgames, Starting Out: Minor pieces Endgames, Starting Out: Rocks Endgames, Complete Endgame Course (Jeremy Silman).

    Openings: Use a database and Replay master games of your favourite openings. Read Starting Out Series or move by move series of your favourite openings.  


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