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What's the most upset you've seen someone get at a tournament?


  • 11 months ago · Quote · #1

    AdorableMogwai

    I've never been to a tournament, so I wanted to ask the people who have, what's the most upset you've ever seen someone get at one? What happened and what did they do?

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #2

    ShiningLotus

    Haha, one guy threw the (flexible so it didn't hurt) board at me after I beat him when everyone was looking. (It was a huge upset too, I'm proud personally)

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #3

    AdorableMogwai

    It would be a funny prank if someone did that at a simul against a GM. Not throw the board at the GM, but just all of a sudden flip the board over and run out of the room screaming.

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #4

    ShiningLotus

    Hahaha I'd wanna see that XD

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #5

    Lady-Jane

    @Slovenslik

    That's exactly what happened to me too!

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #6

    AdorableMogwai

    DeweyOxberger wrote:

    I saw a child get frustrated and piss his pants.  The worst part was he kept playing, refusing to change his pants, he just sat there in his piss-pants and played out the game.

    Here is proof that chess affects peoples' emotions in a basic and primal way. The negativity of chess is powerful enough to make a child neurotically piss his pants, and then continue to play like that. And there are some people that actually want chess to be mandatory in schools?!

    Chess affects me in a bad way too I must admit, I was playing blitz games all day, and even when I was winning, I found myself insulting my opponents. I knew I shouldn't insult them, but the urge was so strong and it felt so good in the heat of the battle to make hatefull comments to them. I said to one person "Silly buttface, tricks are for kids!" when he was down a piece in an endgame and refusing to resign. And you know what, it actually felt really good to say that to him.

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #7

    QueenTakesKnightOOPS

    I've mentioned this incident before in a thread on bad sportsmanship but its worth reposting here.

    I was playing in a Qualifying Tournament for the State Championship many years ago. I had blundered a strong position & lost a piece but I had a good chance of salvaging a draw by perpetual check. A guy on the board next to me picked up a piece then replaced it & moved another. His opponent challenged the move & the guy threw a fit about it. He stood up & started shouting abuse at his opponent, it was a major scene & was disrupting the whole tournament. The Tournament Referee was called & declared the game forfeit & banned the offender from the rest of the tournament. That was the correct call ..... but I was the real loser. I had 5 moves to play in 2 minutes to reach the 60 minute time control in a very complex position. I made a wrong move & eventually lost the game. Post game analysis showed I did have a draw but I missed the key move due to the scene going on at the next board. I placed 2nd in the Tournament by 1/2 a point.

    So I lodged a complaint which lead to the offender being banned from all future tournament play. I found out he had done this before. My game was analyzed but the result was not changed (I did not dispute that call, I couldn't prove that I could have definitely drawn the game considering the time pressure)

    The was a sequel to all that which involved a confrontation in a car park before another tournament. The banned guy accused me of ruining his chance of becoming Australian Champion. I suggested the Australian Checkers Championship might be a more appropriate choice. I blocked the ensuing punch with a motorcycle helmet & ... well we don't need to go there, but as far as I know he never played Tournament Chess again.

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #8

    ShiningLotus

    QueenTakesKnightOOPS wrote:

    I've mentioned this incident before in a thread on bad sportsmanship but its worth reposting here.

    I was playing in a Qualifying Tournament for the State Championship many years ago. I had blundered a strong position & lost a piece but I had a good chance of salvaging a draw by perpetual check. A guy on the board next to me picked up a piece then replaced it & moved another. His opponent challenged the move & the guy threw a fit about it. He stood up & started shouting abuse at his opponent, it was a major scene & was disrupting the whole tournament. The Tournament Referee was called & declared the game forfeit & banned the offender from the rest of the tournament. That was the correct call ..... but I was the real loser. I had 5 moves to play in 2 minutes to reach the 60 minute time control in a very complex position. I made a wrong move & eventually lost the game. Post game analysis showed I did have a draw but I missed the key move due to the scene going on at the next board. I placed 2nd in the Tournament by 1/2 a point.

    So I lodged a complaint which lead to the offender being banned from all future tournament play. I found out he had done this before. My game was analyzed but the result was not changed (I did not dispute that call, I couldn't prove that I could have definitely drawn the game considering the time pressure)

    The was a sequel to all that which involved a confrontation in a car park before another tournament. The banned guy accused me of ruining his chance of becoming Australian Champion. I suggested the Australian Checkers Championship might be a more appropriate choice. I blocked the ensuing punch with a motorcycle helmet & ... well we don't need to go there, but as far as I know he never played Tournament Chess again.

    ...Dang. Intense.

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #9

    chasm1995

    I saw somebody cry at a U1500 when I was 16 because he lost a game where he missed a very simple mate from his opponent while threatening a forced mate in two.

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #10

    AdorableMogwai

    chasm1995 wrote:

    I saw somebody cry at a U1500 when I was 16 because he lost a game where he missed a very simple mate from his opponent while threatening a forced mate in two.

    Isn't it normal for people to cry? I watched the documentary "Brooklyn Castle" and all the kids cried when they lost. Ah, the joy of chess!

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #11

    chasm1995

    AdorableMogwai wrote:
    chasm1995 wrote:

    I saw somebody cry at a U1500 when I was 16 because he lost a game where he missed a very simple mate from his opponent while threatening a forced mate in two.

    Isn't it normal for people to cry? I watched the documentary "Brooklyn Castle" and all the kids cried when they lost. Ah, the joy of chess!

    It's only acceptable to cry in certain situations, like when my friend passed away in a car accident...  Losing a game is nothing compared to something of that magnitude.

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #12

    AdorableMogwai

    It's only alright to cry when someone dies?

    I can actually understand why they cry, when you put a lot of hard work into something and then you fail at it, that's pretty upsetting.

    Death is inevitable for all of us, but losing any given chess game isn't.

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #13

    chasm1995

    AdorableMogwai wrote:

    It's only alright to cry when someone dies?

    I can actually understand why they cry, when you put a lot of hard work into something and then you fail at it, that's pretty upsetting.

    Death is inevitable for all of us, but losing any given chess game isn't.

    I don't mean only death, but that was the only occurance within the past year where I cried and although death is definite, it can occur in such an unexpected way that it's a tragedy when somebody dies at 19.  This isn't the place to talk about it, though, so if you leave a comment pertaining to this, I won't respond to it.

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #14

    AdorableMogwai

    Better for us all to be dead. This is a world designed so that animals have to kill and eat each other, that's sick. Who wants to live in this  crumby world where animals have to eat each other to survive. I wish none of it ever existed.

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #15

    AdorableMogwai

    Slovensik wrote:

    At least you are honest.  I'm always cursing my opponents.  :D

    I try not to insult people like that, but I always end up doing it anyway. The only thing that sucks is when it happens to me, and my opponent is winning and insults me as he wins, that makes me so angry that I wish we were playing OTB so I could punch them in the face.

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #16

    AdorableMogwai

    Slovensik wrote:

    I remember when i was 16 and thinking like that lol... Now i'm 26 and see that life is beautiful.

    The funny thing is that when you get even older, you'll switch back to thinking that way. Except this time it's not based on teen angst but reality. Peoples early to mid 20s are often the happiest time of their lives, you just wait.

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #17

    Estragon

    I have to omit the names, although a few of them might be familiar to those who knew East Coast chess at the time, mid-'70s.

    Back then, there was little certification of arbiters/tournament directors in the US, an open book test was the main qualification, and directing a few small events without incident qualified you to direct larger events.  This made for many TDs who didn't really understand the rules in detail.

     

    At a major regional event, a aging but still formidable contender was playing a young up and coming player rated nearly 300 points below him, but the kid was winning.  Both were in extreme time pressure and neither had a complete scoresheet.  The older player's flag dropped, and the younger one claimed a win on time and the Director was summoned.  The rule at the time was you had to have an accurate scoresheet showing the position on the board in order to claim a win on time, but if you had no more than three move-pairs noted with check marks from time trouble, you had until your own flag fell to complete your scoresheet and claim the win.

    Well, the kid wasn't even close, and neither player really knew how many moves had been made in the time scramble.  But the TD, not knowing the rules, demanded the older player give his scoresheet to help reconstruct the game.  Now, in Europe and FIDE events, the organizers owned your scoresheet, but this was not the case in the US at the time.  So the older player refused to give up his scoresheet to be used against him.

     

    Then the shouting began, the TD demanding, the player refusing, and every spectator, player, passerby, and waitress from the coffee shop down the hall from the ballroom offering the TD their opinion on the rules - all at once.  Now there are still tournament games going on in the room!  It's almost a riot.  If there had been a buffet tray in the room there would surely have been a food fight.  It was chaos, out of control.

     

    So naturally, since everyone involved was at least a "chess friend" of mine, I tried to advise the TD he was wrong on the rule, at which point my friend the kid's father accosted me loudly and aggressively.  He was a big, tall chap who I'd never seen mad, but he was red in the face and gesticulating wildly as he accused me of interference.  Just then, a prominent Ukrainian emigre master, friend to us both, who was short but stocky and athletic, really "buff" at 50 or so, stepped between us.

    Facing the father, he looked up and said in his thick Russian accent, "Vy don' you peek on somevun your own size?" very calmly, but firmly.  The father walked away!

     

    So the shouting is dying down, but the TD is still demanding the scoresheet and making up some rule out of his head to force the player to turn it over.  Finally the player says, "Well, if I must ..." and crumples the sheet into a paper ball, puts it in his mouth, chews vigorously and wetly, then takes out the soaking disgusting ball of chewed up paper and says, "Here you go!" offering it to the TD - who declined.

    It couldn't have been wilder if a honey badger got loose!

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #18

    Estragon

    Ah, Memory Lane . . .Cool

     

    I think it was 1973 when an organizer decided to take advantage of the outside-the-beltway growth in the DC area, and booked "The 1st Reston [Virginia] International" into a brand new luxury hotel.  But when the date approached for the event, the hotel was still under construction so they had to move it - to a hotel in Silver Spring, Maryland.  That should have been a warning, the "Reston" in Silver Spring?

    It was a big money event, Mark Diesen was there, and Tim Taylor and other strong masters, a big crowd.  It's in a huge ballroom in the hotel, so the morning of the second round, the games are going along, the huge room is silent except for the ticking of a couple hundred analog clocks and the occasional sounds of moves, captures, and clock-slaps - when suddenly an alarm goes off!

    It is LOUD, some built-in hotel alarm, and constant.  Naturally, a couple hundred chessplayers immediately began shouting for them to shut that darn thing off, we are playing freakin' chess here you idiots!  Shortly a fellow dressed as a desk clerk comes into the room and announces there is a fire in the kitchen and we must evacuate.  Everyone stands to leave, the guy leaves the hall, but then the alarm just stops. 

    Of course, all the players just sit back down and resume their games. 

     

    For several minutes we were not interrupted, but you could hear the sound of sirens in the distance, lots of sirens drawing ever closer.  Soon it became impossible to ignore the smoke accumulating near the high ceiling.  The TD announced we would have to leave, we should all stop our clocks and follow him.  About half did.

    The smoke continued to fill the room from the high ballroom ceiling down.  As it got lower, more left.  Then the fireman burst into the room in full regalia, a couple carrying axes, and were shocked to see people still in there playing chess and ordered us all out.  Nearly all of us complied.

     

    But one strong master who was also known for his gentlemanly civility was playing a lower rated player who refused to leave.  When the master stopped his clock, his opponent just started it again!  He tried to take it with him but the guy grabbed it back - it was his clock! Surprised So the master stayed at the board with this guy until the firemen physically forced both of them out.

     

    Oh, and the fire was confined to one large fryer and easily contained, and the round resumed less than two hours later.

  • 11 months ago · Quote · #19

    arkledale

    At the last interclub night I attended, one old guy, who was known to lose frequently by running out of time, lost, by running out of time, against a young girl. Clearly unable to control his emotions, he marched up and down the tournament hall (half of the games were still underway), repeatedly spitting out the eff word and banging his empty water bottle against his thigh, like he had profound Tourette's syndrome, for a good half hour. The girl who beat him was concerned for her safety so a few of us surrounded her for protection until he calmed down.

    arkledale


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