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Which is better: Castling Kingside (short) or Queenside (long)?


  • 18 months ago · Quote · #81

    C-nack

    Stampnl wrote:

    IN FRENCH THEY CALL CASTLING QUEENSIDE 'CASTLING CEMETARYSIDE' FUN-FACT!

    Bullshit, they call it small and big castle.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #82

    Oraoradeki

    This is kind of off-topic, but I find players who delay castling very annoying, and this is because it doesn't give away which way their king will go so I can't set up an attack.

    soo going back to the original question:

    Which is better: Castling Kingside (short) or Queenside (long)?

    Neither as long as the King is kept safe!

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #83

    maDawson

    The danger of not castling is simply the vulnerability of the center. If you can maintain a string of calculated attacks that will constantly leave your opponent on the run then not castling probably won't be a major issue until you play more skilled players. However, very often top calibur players will develop their position and peices with a plan of attack, attempt to eliminate possible counter-play(usually getting the king to safety), then taking advatage. It's scary because when your king is at risk many times it will allow your oppoent to not only delay your possible plans at the risk of being mated, but also improve their own position by activating more peices while you are making up lost ground.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #84

    Stampnl

    Cnacnel wrote:
    Stampnl wrote:

    IN FRENCH THEY CALL CASTLING QUEENSIDE 'CASTLING CEMETARYSIDE' FUN-FACT!

    Bullshit, they call it small and big castle.

    "Les Noirs avaient d'autant moins besoin de roquer <<du coté du cimetière>>, que leur PFD est déjà avancé." G. Renaud & V. Kahn, L'art de faire mat, édition Payot, p. 91. Now apologize.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #85

    maDawson

    Oraoradeki wrote:

    This is kind of off-topic, but I find players who delay castling very annoying, and this is because it doesn't give away which way their king will go so I can't set up an attack.

    soo going back to the original question:

    Which is better: Castling Kingside (short) or Queenside (long)?

    Neither as long as the King is kept safe!

    Oraoradeki wrote:

    This is kind of off-topic, but I find players who delay castling very annoying, and this is because it doesn't give away which way their king will go so I can't set up an attack.

    soo going back to the original question:

    Which is better: Castling Kingside (short) or Queenside (long)?

    Neither as long as the King is kept safe!

    If your opponent leaves their king in the center, go FULL FORCE on controlling the center and breaking it any way you can. It seems like a never ending battle but eventually you will have developed your position so much your opponent won't be able to make counterplay. You may not be able to directly snag the king but your opponent will be forced to protect his king. This is good because 1) They won't be able to attack your side of the board without risking a forced mate or pawn promotion on their weaker side. 2) You get to advance pawns and activate dormant peices such as doubling rooks on weak files.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #86

    C-nack

    Stampnl wrote:
    Cnacnel wrote:
    Stampnl wrote:

    IN FRENCH THEY CALL CASTLING QUEENSIDE 'CASTLING CEMETARYSIDE' FUN-FACT!

    Bullshit, they call it small and big castle.

    "Les Noirs avaient d'autant moins besoin de roquer <>, que leur PFD est déjà avancé." G. Renaud & V. Kahn, L'art de faire mat, édition Payot, p. 91. Now apologize.

    That doesn't prove your point. It's not a general name, it's named so in the book probably because in this position going 0-0-0 loses instantly.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #87

    Stampnl

    I never said it's the general name boss, it's just a funny nickname they have for it, which hints at which side it's best to castle.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #88

    C-nack

    Stampnl wrote:

    I never said it's the general name boss, it's just a funny nickname they have for it, which hints at which side it's best to castle.

    "in french they call" means it's general, or at least common.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #89

    Stampnl

    nope.. only if you add "in general" .. but i gather it's hard for you to admit you misunderstood and say you're sorry.. no worries, noone can make you

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #90

    C-nack

    Stampnl wrote:

    nope.. only if you add "in general" .. but i gather it's hard for you to admit you misunderstood and say you're sorry.. no worries, noone can make you

    I always apologize when I make a mistake, this time you made it, probably on account of your language proficiency (or rather lack thereof).

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #91

    Stampnl

    tut tut..

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #92

    bulletheadbilly

    Cnacnel wrote:
    Stampnl wrote:

    nope.. only if you add "in general" .. but i gather it's hard for you to admit you misunderstood and say you're sorry.. no worries, noone can make you

    I always apologize when I make a mistake, this time you made it, probably on account of your language proficiency (or rather lack thereof).

    He could have wrote it in a Language that you don't Understand, instead he tried English, and now your Complaining Expecting him to Appologise. 

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #93

    livluvrok

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 18 months ago · Quote · #94

    livluvrok

    bulletheadbilly wrote:
    Cnacnel wrote:
    Stampnl wrote:

    nope.. only if you add "in general" .. but i gather it's hard for you to admit you misunderstood and say you're sorry.. no worries, noone can make you

    I always apologize when I make a mistake, this time you made it, probably on account of your language proficiency (or rather lack thereof).

    He could have wrote it in a Language that you don't Understand, instead he tried English, and now your Complaining Expecting him to Appologise. 

    I agree. When in doubt, don't give someone a hard time.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #95

    C-nack

    bulletheadbilly wrote:
    Cnacnel wrote:
    Stampnl wrote:

    nope.. only if you add "in general" .. but i gather it's hard for you to admit you misunderstood and say you're sorry.. no worries, noone can make you

    I always apologize when I make a mistake, this time you made it, probably on account of your language proficiency (or rather lack thereof).

    He could have wrote it in a Language that you don't Understand, instead he tried English, and now your Complaining Expecting him to Appologise. 

    What are you talking about?

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #96

    bulletheadbilly

    Cnacnel wrote:
    bulletheadbilly wrote:
    Cnacnel wrote:
    Stampnl wrote:

    nope.. only if you add "in general" .. but i gather it's hard for you to admit you misunderstood and say you're sorry.. no worries, noone can make you

    I always apologize when I make a mistake, this time you made it, probably on account of your language proficiency (or rather lack thereof).

    He could have wrote it in a Language that you don't Understand, instead he tried English, and now your Complaining Expecting him to Appologise. 

    What are you talking about?

     The Grammar Police Need to Start showing there Literacy Badges and Academic Arrest Warrants. I Have the Right Not to remain Silent,  And If I choose to Castle, My Rook will be Held Closely Against Me, In A Chess Judicial Court Of Law.....

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #97

    C-nack

    bulletheadbilly wrote:
    Cnacnel wrote:
    bulletheadbilly wrote:
    Cnacnel wrote:
    Stampnl wrote:

     

     

     

     

     The Grammar Police Need to Start showing there Literacy Badges and Academic Arrest Warrants. I Have the Right Not to remain Silent,  And If I choose to Castle, My Rook will be Held Closely Against Me, In A Chess Judicial Court Of Law.....

    "their" not "there", you are under arrest.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #98

    bulletheadbilly

    Cnacnel wrote:
    bulletheadbilly wrote:
    Cnacnel wrote:
    bulletheadbilly wrote:
    Cnacnel wrote:
    Stampnl wrote:

     

     

     

     

     The Grammar Police Need to Start showing there Literacy Badges and Academic Arrest Warrants. I Have the Right Not to remain Silent,  And If I choose to Castle, My Rook will be Held Closely Against Me, In A Chess Judicial Court Of Law.....

    "their" not "there", you are under arrest.

    Yeah, Cardiac Arrest....

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #99

    bobyyyy

    Only wimps castle their king.

    Just joking. I castle king side on my 4th move.

  • 18 months ago · Quote · #100

    plutonia

    hoynck wrote:

    In 2006, during the Open Dutch Championship in Dieren, I played a nice game (with white!) that illustrates my fear (with black!). It includes a few themes discussed over here: castling long, not castling and the hammering on the Najdorf-roof. We were both app. ELO 2100.

     



     

     

     

    Wanna laugh? I was just quickly skipping through your game and at move 13 I thought "13...Kf8 and you have nothing". I mean, it took me like 3 seconds to see this move and I am around 400 points lower than you and your opponent.

    So then I turn on Fritz, and incredibly I was right. 13...Kf8 and black is almost winning (-1.33). Your sacrifice was not sound and you won because black didn't find the best defence.

    I didn't like the move played in the game, 13...Nb6, and in fact Fritz confirms that this move loses the game (from -1.33 to immediately 2.30 after it).

     

     

    I'm not bragging: I know you'd destroy me as I'm like 1700 OTB.

    But it's just that "I have a feel" for that kind of Najdorf positions. Finding the way to survive in such a mess it's a thing that I enjoy and maybe, that I'm relatively good at.

    It's a matter of taste.

    Your game really made me want to play the Najdorf even more :)


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