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Why Beginners Quit Playing Chess


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #1

    decenso

    I started playing chess (to get better) in January. Since then I've acquired almost 100 chess books (hard copies and e-books); several chess playing programs (Chessmaster 9000 and 10th, Fritz) for both PC and Palm; and have numerous chess training software programs (Convecta's stuff, etc).

    Chess has ceased being fun for me - it's become an impossible obsession with wanting to get better. I've been playing for three months and I want to beat 1600 players!

    I almost stopped playing until I realized this maxim for beginners: when chess ceases being fun, you'll cease playing it.

    I want to encourage all beginners as I have been encouraged - the number one priority for you in your beginning of chess play is to have fun. Don't let the myriads of studies and books and programs suffocate you to the point of the joy of game being lost amidst the challenge of the game.

    Chess is deep and can be studied for a lifetime. In the beginning, have fun, take your time, and ... oh, have fun.

    Frank


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #2

    Lord-Svenstikov

    Wise words. How did you manage to get through almost 100 books in 3 months?

    Anyway, I maintain that playing the game rather than reading about it is the way to get better, especially when you first start.

     


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #3

    pinkerton

    I'm just wondering if he read all those chess books, reread them, made notes of important points and concepts while stamping the important positions on around his desk. Also wondering if he studied his games and see where he went wrong by consulting his books. At the moment I have only limited my acquisitions to 10 (only) which provide a groundwork for every phase of the game.
  • 7 years ago · Quote · #4

    God2

    Lord-Svenstikov wrote:

    Wise words. How did you manage to get through almost 100 books in 3 months?

    Anyway, I maintain that playing the game rather than reading about it is the way to get better, especially when you first start.

     


    i agree.


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #5

    The_Pitts

    so far I only have 4 books 1 program (sigma chess) but my obsession is still in it's early stages (2 months) I played alot from 3-12yrs then again around 18-19yrs old then about 2 months ago something weird happened and now I'm playing at least an hour a day. I guess my point is that in a way I'm not a beginner and in a way I am.
    I'm 29 now and don't expect to beat 1800's but it's not even about winning or chess even. It is fun... yes. but moreover it's a way I'm connecting to myself as a young person by playing a silly game that I loved when I was a child.

    why I stopped playing before didn't  have to do with fun it was a lack of interest by those around me. Now I have a few people who I play OTB but chess.com has been a huge change from the way I played in the past being able to play so many  people has renewed my Interest with vigor. thank you all. 

      

     

     


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #6

    garrettendi

    ive only really taken chess really seriously since february. i really needed to see your post. ive been playing a lot lately, and while i was still having fun, i needed to see the danger in letting it become study and not a game.

     so im gonna try and keep it fun. study yes - but not lose the fun element which youve highlighted.

     thanks a lot!


  • 7 years ago · Quote · #7

    decenso

    Lord-Svenstikov wrote:

    Wise words. How did you manage to get through almost 100 books in 3 months?

    Anyway, I maintain that playing the game rather than reading about it is the way to get better, especially when you first start.

     


    LOL!

    I acquired them; I have only read a couple. The sheer volume of stuff I bought in my new found addiction overwhelmed me.



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